AMEX Refund Letter

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

mjeagent

New Member
Bronze
Jun 28, 2007
418
0
0
Northern Virginia
#1
Filed a claim with AMEX for the $200 overcharge for the 8 GB iPhone I purchased. Received a letter in the mail today asking for various pieces of information to be submitted my me within 60 days. Crazy stuff like original receipt (even though it is on my AMEX statement), AMEX statements, Homeowner's Insurance policy (cover page and policy specifics copied), etc.

If I go through all this I better as hell get my $200 back.
 

mjeagent

New Member
Bronze
Jun 28, 2007
418
0
0
Northern Virginia
#3
Got me. They want my policy number, agent name, number, deductible, etc.

I guess they want to make sure you are not double-dipping (filing a homeowner's claim while filing a claim with AMEX).
 

joerj11

New Member
Bronze
Jul 13, 2007
40
0
0
#4
I got the same letter. I actually posted about it in this forum b/c I wanted to see if anyone else had got one. Anyway, I ended up calling back and inquired about it. They told me they only sent it just in case the person reviewing my claim wanted me to submit any other documentation but at this point I didn't have to do anything with it besides hold onto it. They are just trying to be nice, speed up the process if the in fact do need further documentation.
 

Platinum

New Member
Bronze
Jun 27, 2007
198
0
0
#5
Filed a claim with AMEX for the $200 overcharge for the 8 GB iPhone I purchased. Received a letter in the mail today asking for various pieces of information to be submitted my me within 60 days. Crazy stuff like original receipt (even though it is on my AMEX statement), AMEX statements, Homeowner's Insurance policy (cover page and policy specifics copied), etc.

If I go through all this I better as hell get my $200 back.
$200 overcharge? If I am not mistaken your're an adult - whom is supposed to be responsible for what you buy. Did you sign a receipt at the Apple store with the "$200 overcharge" displayed? If you agree to pay a price for something then I don't see where the overcharge is coming from, it was your choice to buy it.

You bought a piece of technology, its not breaking news that the price will drop, it happens with everything in our world.
 
Jul 7, 2007
12
0
0
#6
$200 overcharge? If I am not mistaken your're an adult - whom is supposed to be responsible for what you buy. Did you sign a receipt at the Apple store with the "$200 overcharge" displayed? If you agree to pay a price for something then I don't see where the overcharge is coming from, it was your choice to buy it.

You bought a piece of technology, its not breaking news that the price will drop, it happens with everything in our world.
Oh c'mon! When will the apple-istas just except the egregious nature of this move by Apple and move on? Jobs' capitulation on this should end the argument. Even the all-powerful Jobs gave in and admitted that the timing and precipitous amount of the cut was a slap in the face to the people who went ga ga over an untested and unseen product and took a leap of faith. If Amex wants to please its customers by refunding the $200, good for them, and good for the people who can take advantage of it. Hell, Amex doesn't even offer price-protection as a feature on its cards anymore and they understand the special nature of this case enough to make an exception.

I love, love, love my iPhone, but if someone was willing to give me my full $200 back I'd take it in a second, and I fully support anyone who can get theirs.
 

minivini

Member
Bronze
Jul 6, 2007
418
0
16
#8
$200 overcharge? If I am not mistaken your're an adult - whom is supposed to be responsible for what you buy. Did you sign a receipt at the Apple store with the "$200 overcharge" displayed? If you agree to pay a price for something then I don't see where the overcharge is coming from, it was your choice to buy it.

You bought a piece of technology, its not breaking news that the price will drop, it happens with everything in our world.
It's a price protection offered by some credit card companies. Tell me, what's wrong with using it? What's the difference in this and, say, buying a plasma tv at Best Buy and then they reduce the price 30% the next weekend. Happens all the time, and it makes consumers angry. Since this wasn't a small price reduction, consumers are due some protection - if they signed up for it. Find something else to get your panties in a wad about. By the way, I agree. The iPhone is a piece of technology. Price drops are par for the course. Just don't get pissy when some people are offered protection against this sort of thing.
 

coop1701

Zealot
Silver
Jun 30, 2007
893
112
43
#10
My question is..., Are you guys going to get the 200 dollars from AMEX and the 100 dollar credit from Apple. I guess you guys are coming out great if you're getting both.

I guess the honorable thing to do would be for you guys to send the Apple credit back or give it to another iPhone user who's not as lucky.
 

Wiggo

Member
Bronze
Jul 7, 2007
103
0
16
Memphis
#11
It's a price protection offered by some credit card companies. Tell me, what's wrong with using it? What's the difference in this and, say, buying a plasma tv at Best Buy and then they reduce the price 30% the next weekend. Happens all the time, and it makes consumers angry. Since this wasn't a small price reduction, consumers are due some protection - if they signed up for it. Find something else to get your panties in a wad about. By the way, I agree. The iPhone is a piece of technology. Price drops are par for the course. Just don't get pissy when some people are offered protection against this sort of thing.
Best Buy is a bad example, as they themselves offer price protection for 30 days (I've even had them automatically credit my Best Buy card with no action on my part).
 

mm1250

New Member
Bronze
Jun 23, 2007
81
0
0
#13
STill haven't got my credit. Called Amex and they said 2weeks still! It seems lots have already got their credits. .
 

z28black98

Member
Bronze
Sep 10, 2007
239
0
16
Tulsa, OK
#14
It's a price protection offered by some credit card companies. Tell me, what's wrong with using it? What's the difference in this and, say, buying a plasma tv at Best Buy and then they reduce the price 30% the next weekend. Happens all the time, and it makes consumers angry. Since this wasn't a small price reduction, consumers are due some protection - if they signed up for it. Find something else to get your panties in a wad about. By the way, I agree. The iPhone is a piece of technology. Price drops are par for the course. Just don't get pissy when some people are offered protection against this sort of thing.

there is a big difference between your examples. CC, BB, Ultimate electronics all have price gaurantees, Apple and ATT do not. No one in the cell phone industry has one to my knowledge. Whats stupid is that people like the OP claim it was an "overcharge", when in fact it wasn't an overcharge, its a price he agreed to pay the day he bought the phone. I hope they don't honor it, because he agreed to the said amount.

An overcharge is going out to eat for dinner with your family and they charge your credit card twice. You are able to recoup the amount they charged you twice for. People are using the excuse that its an overcharge, and in reality it isn't. People need to stop crying, man up and admit thats the price you pay for technology the day it comes out on the market.
 

coop1701

Zealot
Silver
Jun 30, 2007
893
112
43
#15
Which brings me back to my question....

How honest are you guys going to be if you get your 200 dollar refund....?

Are you going to take the 200 from AMEX and the 100 from Apple?

I'll bet all of you do. So you're really getting 300 dollars for buying a phone.
 

joerj11

New Member
Bronze
Jul 13, 2007
40
0
0
#16
Which brings me back to my question....

How honest are you guys going to be if you get your 200 dollar refund....?

Are you going to take the 200 from AMEX and the 100 from Apple?

I'll bet all of you do. So you're really getting 300 dollars for buying a phone.
Honest? When has anyone lied about anything? I told Amex the truth, if they grant me the $200 per phone refund that is their prerogative. And let me tell you they will be rewarded. I’ll make sure I put everything I can on my Amex card.

No one has been dishonest. Not Apple and certainly not their customers.

Besides, I doubt we will be seeing any money from Amex. Some of the early claimers may have gotten lucky, but I don’t think they are going to award the bulk of us the refund.
 

minivini

Member
Bronze
Jul 6, 2007
418
0
16
#17
there is a big difference between your examples. CC, BB, Ultimate electronics all have price gaurantees, Apple and ATT do not. No one in the cell phone industry has one to my knowledge. Whats stupid is that people like the OP claim it was an "overcharge", when in fact it wasn't an overcharge, its a price he agreed to pay the day he bought the phone. I hope they don't honor it, because he agreed to the said amount.

An overcharge is going out to eat for dinner with your family and they charge your credit card twice. You are able to recoup the amount they charged you twice for. People are using the excuse that its an overcharge, and in reality it isn't. People need to stop crying, man up and admit thats the price you pay for technology the day it comes out on the market.
Ok, I'm not going to argue semantics. It's simply a price protection service offered by some card companies. If you find the item you purchased within "x" timeframe, they credit the difference. This is what happened, and some people are able to take advantage of the service they are offered. Its not dishonest or unethical. It's a SERVICE offered.

Apparently BB was a bad example specifically, but it still holds in general for most places if a card is used that offers the protection service.

Really, it boils down to use the service if have it and want to. Faulting people for using a service offered by their creditor seems a little ridiculous.
 

joerj11

New Member
Bronze
Jul 13, 2007
40
0
0
#18
Ok, I'm not going to argue semantics. It's simply a price protection service offered by some card companies. If you find the item you purchased within "x" timeframe, they credit the difference. This is what happened, and some people are able to take advantage of the service they are offered. Its not dishonest or unethical. It's a SERVICE offered.

Apparently BB was a bad example specifically, but it still holds in general for most places if a card is used that offers the protection service.

Really, it boils down to use the service if have it and want to. Faulting people for using a service offered by their creditor seems a little ridiculous.
Hear hear.
 

Waveguy

New Member
Bronze
Aug 18, 2007
73
0
0
#19
there is a big difference between your examples. CC, BB, Ultimate electronics all have price gaurantees, Apple and ATT do not. No one in the cell phone industry has one to my knowledge. Whats stupid is that people like the OP claim it was an "overcharge", when in fact it wasn't an overcharge, its a price he agreed to pay the day he bought the phone. I hope they don't honor it, because he agreed to the said amount.

An overcharge is going out to eat for dinner with your family and they charge your credit card twice. You are able to recoup the amount they charged you twice for. People are using the excuse that its an overcharge, and in reality it isn't. People need to stop crying, man up and admit thats the price you pay for technology the day it comes out on the market.
By your logic, anyone who purchased an iPhone at the original price shouldn't take advantage of Apple's $100 credit offer, either. Apple may not provide price protection beyond 10 days, but Steve Jobs basically admitted that the price increase was too high and too rapid, and Apple has done the right thing.

As for Amex, it's their decision whether to rebate $200 plus tax to cardmembers, and taking advantage of it is simply good sense. It has nothing to do with recognizing that early adoption comes at a price.