Apple faces mounting complaints on iPhone battery

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TrippalHealicks

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Mar 2, 2007
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#3
This is so weird. Class action suit?! You don't like the rates, don't buy the damn thing! Only in America!

Maybe we should sue BMW for the high price of their brake rotors. wow.

I agree with you, for the most part.

Unfortunately, your "average" consumer won't know that the battery isn't swappable, and won't know about the charges associated with replacing it, either. Good thing is, most people that are interested in this phone, are gonna upgrade to something else way before the battery is dead, anyway.
 

nyc_rock

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Jul 6, 2007
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#4
I have been a critic of the iPhone but this is ridiculous. If you don't like the phone, don't buy it.
 

aggieman

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Jul 6, 2007
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Dallas, TX
#5
i agree. that's what i've been telling people all along. we know the iPhone's batteries just like the iPod are non removeable. we know it's a touch screen keyboard. we know there's no 3G. If you don't like it do not buy it. If you didn't do your research and didn't know any of these things, well you have 14 days to get your money back.
 

nyc_rock

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Jul 6, 2007
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#6
i agree. that's what i've been telling people all along. we know the iPhone's batteries just like the iPod are non removeable. we know it's a touch screen keyboard. we know there's no 3G. If you don't like it do not buy it. If you didn't do your research and didn't know any of these things, well you have 14 days to get your money back.

The litigious nature of this country is getting ridiculous. Until the losers of these lawsuits are made responsible for the victors expenses this will continue to get worse.

Just to add another point, I knew the non removable battery would be a problem for the iPhone. It is apparent that, as opposed to design coniderations, Apple saw the replancement battery businesss as an additonal revenue stream.
 
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nyc_rock

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#7
I agree with you, for the most part.

Unfortunately, your "average" consumer won't know that the battery isn't swappable, and won't know about the charges associated with replacing it, either. Good thing is, most people that are interested in this phone, are gonna upgrade to something else way before the battery is dead, anyway.

I don't know if thats the case. From the posts I have read, people who bought this device are not planning on upgrading and have expectations that it will last several years.
 

Martlet

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Jul 11, 2007
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#8
The litigious nature of this country is getting ridiculous. Until the losers of these lawsuits are made responsible for the victors expenses this will continue to get worse.

Just to add another point, I knew the non removable battery would be a problem for the iPhone. It is apparent that, as opposed to design coniderations, Apple saw the replancement battery businesss as an additonal revenue stream.
Or they saw the past few years problems with exploding batteries, particularly ones from less reliable 3rd party replacement battery vendors, as a concern.

The non-replaceable battery can be viewed as a safety feature to prevent the stupidity of buying a cheap knock-off battery and having it burn your face off.

By keeping control of the battery, they retain control of the quality of the iPhone.

I view this as a good thing.
 
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nyc_rock

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#9
Or they saw the past few years problems with exploding batteries, particularly ones from less reliable 3rd party replacement battery vendors, as a concern.

The non-replaceable battery can be viewed as a safety feature to prevent the stupidity of buying a cheap knock-off battery and having it burn your face off.

By keeping control of the battery, they retain control of the quality of the iPhone.

I view this as a good thing.
Oh please. Only a fan boy could come up with such a rationalization. 10 billion cell phones in the world and Im not sure I have heard of one blowing up.
 

Tinman

Evangelist
Gold
Jul 16, 2007
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#10
I agree with you, for the most part.

Unfortunately, your "average" consumer won't know that the battery isn't swappable, and won't know about the charges associated with replacing it, either.
Then the average consumer should read what's right on the iPhone's box:
"Battery has limited recharge cycles and may eventually need to be replaced by Apple service provider. Battery life and charge cycles vary by use and settings. See www.apple.com/batteries."


--
Mike
 

Silverado

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Jul 6, 2007
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#12
The first couple of Treo families (180/270/300 line and the 600) came out without replaceable batteries. People were very unhappy with that at the time as well. I don't think this has anything to do with creating another revenue stream.

IMHO, companies do this to fit as big a battery as possible in their new, power-hungry device. Believe it or not, you can put a larger battery in the thing if you don't have to add a door, make the battery regularly-shaped and place it in a compartment near the outside of the phone so it's accessible without exposing the insides of the unit. Think of wanting to stuff as much putty as possible in something like the iPhone. You will get a lot less in if you have to make it replaceable.

As time goes by and they create a few iterations, they get better at saving power and battery technology improves, so they no longer need to cut all corners to get reasonable battery life.
 

OJsakila

New Member
Jul 15, 2007
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#13
Well I know some people are having problems with their battery but mine is the best most powerful battery I've ever had in any device I've ever owned. I've owned a ton of devices, too. This is by far the best. And just for the record, has anyone ever really needed to replace a battery in a phone before? I have not. I have bought a larger capacity battery before but never to replace one and I've owned cell phones since 1992 and the infamous Startac. But maybe I'm just lucky because I just don't have this problem in any way withy battery. I well...
 

erroneous

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Jun 23, 2007
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#14
Being a person that was at the very front of the line back on
June 29, I do remember these facts before I decided to start a line,
and make my purchase:

*I remember that the activation fee was published.
*I knew the price of the phone.

*I understood the contract. (It was my first cell phone, so
I didn't have to part my ways from another carrier.)

*The rate plans were published, and made available before "iDay"
on the AT&T web site.

*I did indeed realize the battery was housed within the device
in such a way that made it non-replaceable by an average consumer.

The only aspect I don't recall ever seeing published
or written about before 6 PM June 29 were the charges, fees,
and rental costs that later came to light after the phone was
made physically available.

Unless someone can post an authenticated URL pointing to actual
documentation of what the charges for replacing the battery were going to be,
(before the product was physically released)
there is a fair "beef" here.

The complaint of costs required to be paid to replace the battery.

I realize the battery replacement information was to be found at
the Apple site after I had bought the phone, "but" I don't remember
ever having any access to it before 6 PM on that June 29th day.

Duh, that's right, I was standing in line.

The launch of the product does have its sneaky attributes about it.

I do have a sense of confidence that as everyone mounts up
their 400 plus charges the manufacturer claims the battery has
before it's down graded to having only 80 percent of it's original
life, that Apple will have come up with a way of keeping customers
happy.

(I don't know of any car dealership I've ever did businesss with
that charges their customers for a loaner car on a product they are maintaining.)
To borrow an analogy if I may.

I absolutely enjoy the device.

Guess I'll see how I feel about it... when the battery eventually
does starts degrading.

John
 

ssnake937

New Member
Jul 23, 2007
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#15
What is the problem about that battery? After 400 cycles, which is over a year, it is still at 80% battery life. Which from all the reviews I've read the battery lives pretty good. Plus there's a service where they'd do it for $30 bucks.
 

kdarling

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Jun 20, 2007
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#16
What is the problem about that battery? After 400 cycles, which is over a year, it is still at 80% battery life.
Common misconception. Read Apple's specs again. They don't guarantee it will have a full 80%.

Apple says that the battery will have UP to 80% charging capability. If your battery gets warm a lot (perhaps you have it in a case), it could easily be less than 60% after a year.