Apple refuses to help FBI Crack terrorist's iPhone citing right to privacy

Discussion in 'iPhone 5C' started by bballrob, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
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    Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, and Yahoo have done the same, albeit "very quietly," according to the linked article. No public letters of support backing Tim Cook, and no skywriters have been hired to write messages in the sky.

    A cursory search on Google turned up no word from Blackberry on the current situation, but they've previously stated they don't agree with Apple's stance on privacy.

    Update: Actually, Twitter hasn't been that quiet about its support of Apple:

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    #21 Rafagon, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  2. iPutz

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    I couldn't agree more with Tim Cook's position on this issue. Apple offered to get the requested information off the device and turn it over to the FBI but the FBI seems to want carte blanche to look at any device they choose. Like most others, I have nothing to hide but I'm also not willing to allow my personal data to just be out there for anyone to go through as they wish either.
     
  3. Ledsteplin

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    The Department of Justice has filed a motion to compel Apple to help the FBI unlock the phone.

    This may call for more than one bag of popcorn.
     
  4. Europa

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    I predict they won't be compelled.
     
  5. Rafagon

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  6. Rafagon

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    Seven days' worth of bags of popcorn, to be exact. Apple has until February 26th to respond to the court order.

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    Maybe the court needs to ask Taylor Swift to write a letter to Apple.
     
  7. Kadelic

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    What if they are and they refuse? Will they be found in contempt? If Apple really digs their heels in, what can the FBI and the DOJ do? Fine them? Find them in contempt? Just curious if they have any real authority here.

    Edit: All rhetorical questions :)
     
    #27 Kadelic, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  8. Kadelic

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    Hmmm, apparently the 5c in question "had its passcode changed within 24 hours of it coming into government possession."

    Article here.
     
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  9. Rafagon

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    "Apple is saying that the iPhone in question, used by shooter Syed Rizwan Farook, had its passcode changed within 24 hours of it coming into government possession. If that hadn't happened, then Apple thinks it might have been possible to access the phone without creating custom software to bypass the phone's passcode requirement. This could've been done through a tactic that would've connected the phone to a known Wi-Fi network and caused the device to automatically back up its data to Apple servers…"​

    And what would've happened if the device would've backed up its data to Apple servers? Apple and/or the FBI could've had access to the data there?

    …So I'm interpreting this to mean that our data is only 100% secure as long as we don't back up to Apple servers?
     
  10. Ledsteplin

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    We don't use or have that "tactic". I doubt it's the same as backing up to iCloud or iTunes as we know it. Your stuff is safe, Raf!
     
    #30 Ledsteplin, Feb 19, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2016
  11. Ledsteplin

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    FBI director James Comey and Tim Cook have been invited to testify on this issue before the House Commerce Committee. Just gets deeper and deeper!
     
  12. Kadelic

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  13. Zanthe

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    The ultimate Catch 22. :(
     
  14. MrMike6by9

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    I don't, as a rule, do more than read Twitter. For this issue, I had to "heart" the original AND retweet it.
     
  15. Europa

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    Yes, had the password not been changed by the FBI, the device could have been backed up if it was brought within range of a known WiFi location. The FBI gained access to the last backup when they changed the password, but it was more than a month old and didn't have any relevant information they were looking for. The terrorist destroyed all other devices he had and likely stopped these backups intentionally to avoid leaving traces. There might not be anything there, but they needed to check. They can't change it back to the old password because Apple doesn't allow using an old password for a year. Had it not been changed, Apple could have created a new backup on a known WiFi location, decrypted the backup and given it to them...without creating a backdoor, which is what Apple is fighting against. They aren't opposed to handing over information of known terrorists; they just don't want to create this backdoor because of the precedent it sets. The government could then extend the breach of privacy and demand that Apple build surveillance software to intercept users' personal data, including financial and health records, track their locations and activate iPhone mics and cameras.

    No. It's currently secure unless you commit a terrorist act or something of that sort. But the government is pushing for more and Apple is resisting. We'll have to wait and see how it plays out.
     
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  16. up10ad

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    I'm supporting Apple's position because of the privacy and backdoor issues, but mostly because of the precedent this would set to allow the government to force individuals and corporations to perform; to create software, to build products, etc.. If they can do this, what prevents them form requiring Google, MS or Apple to write surveillance software? Will AT&T be required to capture all phone data and turn it over? This could lead to a situation where the government actually forces individuals to do things like purchase health insurance simply because they are alive (oh, that's already happened). .
     
  17. Rafagon

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    Tim Cook goes to jail until he chooses to comply?

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  18. Ledsteplin

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    I have a few requests for Tim as well. Maybe the FBI could throw those in for good measure. :D
     
  19. Kadelic

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    I would hope it wouldn't come to that.
     
  20. Europa

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