Apple refuses to help FBI Crack terrorist's iPhone citing right to privacy

Discussion in 'iPhone 5C' started by bballrob, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. Mrallank59

    Mrallank59 Contributor
    Bronze

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Likes Received:
    26
    I wasn't aware of the political rule. I'll be more mindful.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  2. Sponsored Advertisement

  3. Napoleon PhoneApart

    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    4,381
    Good advice for all of us. :)
     
  4. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,226
    Whatever the FBI and their friends did to unlock Syed’s iPhone only works on the iPhone 5c and older models. Additionally, it doesn’t work on the iPhone 5s (which was introduced at the same time as the 5c).

    Phew! :D
     
  5. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,226
  6. Europa

    Europa Moderator
    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    5,429
    And unsurprisingly, they found nothing of use on it. He had two phones, a work phone and a personal phone. He smashed the personal phone with a hammer before committing the act and left the work phone intact. Since he was smart enough to destroy one of them, there was a high probability that the one he left intact had no useful information on it. But obviously, a good investigation would involve checking it no matter how bad the odds are of anything substantial being found. The problem was how they tried to use it to set a precedent for future abuse.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • List
  7. liberated

    liberated Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    463
    I agree, that was really the goal. Civil liberties slowly lost the same way !
     
  8. elipeordan112

    elipeordan112 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2017
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cyber security is a huge public safety concern. On the one hand, the FBI is confronted with its current dilemma of gathering evidence in a terrorism case. On the other hand, Apple is considering the strategic implications of a world in which strong encryption is ubiquitous but only available to bad actors and not consumers of American products.
     

Share This Page