Apple refuses to help FBI Crack terrorist's iPhone citing right to privacy

Europa

Moderator
Senior Moderator
Dec 12, 2008
28,365
5,506
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Utah
#65
And unsurprisingly, they found nothing of use on it. He had two phones, a work phone and a personal phone. He smashed the personal phone with a hammer before committing the act and left the work phone intact. Since he was smart enough to destroy one of them, there was a high probability that the one he left intact had no useful information on it. But obviously, a good investigation would involve checking it no matter how bad the odds are of anything substantial being found. The problem was how they tried to use it to set a precedent for future abuse.
 

liberated

Genius
Gold
Jul 19, 2007
3,237
487
83
#66
And unsurprisingly, they found nothing of use on it. He had two phones, a work phone and a personal phone. He smashed the personal phone with a hammer before committing the act and left the work phone intact. Since he was smart enough to destroy one of them, there was a high probability that the one he left intact had no useful information on it. But obviously, a good investigation would involve checking it no matter how bad the odds are of anything substantial being found. The problem was how they tried to use it to set a precedent for future abuse.
I agree, that was really the goal. Civil liberties slowly lost the same way !
 
Jan 2, 2017
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#67
Cyber security is a huge public safety concern. On the one hand, the FBI is confronted with its current dilemma of gathering evidence in a terrorism case. On the other hand, Apple is considering the strategic implications of a world in which strong encryption is ubiquitous but only available to bad actors and not consumers of American products.