Are iPhone and iPad transfer speeds being purposely throttled?

Rafagon

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#1
The author of this article presents some compelling evidence which appears to indicate that AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint--perhaps in cahoots with apple--are throttling data transfer speeds on iPhones and iPads in order to "even out the network," because these devices, due to their "complex OS," eat more data than their Android counterparts, even when idle.
 
Dec 10, 2009
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#2
The way I understand it, these built in throttles are coded and submitted by the carriers, and Apple installs them on the respective models. I don't think there is any reason Apple would want to limit the speeds of the flagship device....
It does make sense from a provider standpoint, as they know any new iPhone model will attract new users to any given network, and that they would seek to minimize the negative impact on overall network data speeds.
Lends credence to the reports, for example, of non iPhone Sprint users claiming they had faster 3G data speeds on the network....
 

iP5

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#3
Didn't know the iPhone consumes more data for the same usage. It's actually surprising given that browsing in iOS often defaults to sites that are optimized for mobile whereas I quickly toggle and often between Android and Desktop mode, where the latter should be a larger data hit.

Sent from my Nexus 4
 

Rafagon

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#5
Didn't know the iPhone consumes more data for the same usage. It's actually surprising given that browsing in iOS often defaults to sites that are optimized for mobile whereas I quickly toggle and often between Android and Desktop mode, where the latter should be a larger data hit.

Sent from my Nexus 4
It's not really about what you see, i.e. whether a site is mobile-optimized or not. There's a lot of maintenance stuff going on behind the scenes; some of it we can opt out of, and some of it we cannot. Just one example: under Settings > About > Diagnostics & Usage, I always keep it on "Don't Send," as I have no idea just how much diagnostic data Apple would send to itself if I had it set to "Send."
 

Rafagon

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#6
:eek: They shut him down! I bet you anything, the Big Three hired a hitman to kill the gentleman who posted that article and then took down his article! That link was working perfectly last night. In fact, I went into my own browser history from last night and tried to visit it from there, and it is no longer accessible.

It was on Macrumors where I saw a brief synopsis of the article and a link to the article. The story is gone from Macrumors as well. I wish I had saved a copy of the webpage.

Update: It is still up at Macrumors. Here is the link.

dead link.jpg
 

Europa

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#7
:eek: They shut him down! I bet you anything, the Big Three hired a hitman to kill the gentleman who posted that article and then took down his article! That link was working perfectly last night. In fact, I went into my own browser history from last night and tried to visit it from there, and it is no longer accessible.

It was on Macrumors where I saw a brief synopsis of the article and a link to the article. The story is gone from Macrumors as well. I wish I had saved a copy of the webpage.

View attachment 29692
You can alway load a cached version (yesterday's version before it was pulled, in this case) of the website by adding cache: to the beginning of the URL. Here's a link to the cached webpage:
The Ugly Truth: Your iPhone and iPad May Be LIMITED (T-Mobile the possible Exception)
 
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Rafagon

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#8
You can alway load a cached version (yesterday's version before it was pulled, in this case) of the website by adding cache: to the beginning of the URL. Here's a link to the cached webpage:
The Ugly Truth: Your iPhone and iPad May Be LIMITED (T-Mobile the possible Exception)

I didn't know that! Thanks for the tip!

Here is Macrumors' report on the story... It's an excellent summary and it gets the point across. I had erroneously reported that it was gone from Macrumors as well. It's a good summary so if anyone's still interested in the story, click that link... (I have no idea how long that story will stay up on Macrumors; they may remove it since their link to the original article is obviously broken.)

I e-mailed the website asking why such an excellent article had been removed, and the author wrote me back and explained that a large group of negative commentators kept harassing him and posting hateful, if not inappropriate, things about him, and that the jailbreaking community warned him that Apple and/or the Big Three could go after him with legal action, so he took it down to avoid that potentially ugly encounter.

It's unfortunate that someone who tried to enlighten others by exposing carriers' alleged inappropriate actions cannot speak freely without harassment.

Update: Your cache trick is indeed excellent. I thought it would only work for me, using the cache on my hard drive, but it's actually stored at Google, so anyone can see it! That's wonderful!
 
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Dec 10, 2009
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#10
iClarified article: Apple Does Not Throttle iPhone Data Speeds via Carrier Bundles

Key points:

AnandTech notes that it's actually only the iPhone 4S that is limited to HSDPA Category 10 since it uses a Qualcomm MDM6600 chip which is only capable of up to Category 10 on the downlink. The settings for the iPhone 5 is actually in the file 'overrides_N41_N42.plist' which may have been overlooked by the original poster. In that file the correct HSDPA Category 24 (64QAM dual carrier - 42 mbps) setting is found.

In regards to the throttling settings, they aren't for data speeds rather they are throttles that prevent the phone from continually trying to reattach to an LTE network in case of error. They basically prevent your device from wasting battery life endlessly when there is a network issue. Additionally, it prevents an overload that could be caused when too many devices are retrying to connect too fast.