Beta testers leaving bad reviews on apps that are not iOS 7 compatible

IllusionEntity

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#1

Marianne

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#2
Yeah, this is pretty sad. It must be so disappointing to the developers of the apps getting negative reviews that there are idiots out there who don't think beyond their own experience to realize that developers can't issue updates for beta versions immediately.
 

Europa

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#3
It bothers me how frequently I hear people make negative remarks after they get an app update and the app still crashes, etc. These apps weren't updated for a beta; they were updated for the current 6.x firmware. People who choose to run the beta need to anticipate incompatibilities and they shouldn't be complaining when they don't work. Developers aren't responsible to update them until the GM and many aren't going to waste time with it when the next beta version could break them again.
 

Napoleon PhoneApart

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#4
Totally agree. Most of us technically shouldn't even be running the beta. It's not the app developers' fault their apps don't run on the beta. They're not worried about updating their apps for iOS 7 until it's publicly available or at least at Golden Master.
 

chris

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#5
Apple's beta releases are unlike any other, in that it's basically a come one, come all – provided you've got $99 per year. That's not even a requirement, with many getting UDID slots for the price of a cup coffee (or free coffee). Throw in pretty much ever two-bit tech blogger who pays for the opportunity to abuse the NDA at every turn, but man I'm sure they love all those juicy pageviews.

The low cost of entry helps increase those who are considering development, but it has consequences. I'm not sure how those can be avoided. Thus, we have the end result. People who shouldn't be running iOS. Not because it's beta, but because they don't understand the definition of beta. Unfinished software, which can result in a less than stable device.
 

IllusionEntity

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#6
Apple's beta releases are unlike any other, in that it's basically a come one, come all – provided you've got $99 per year. That's not even a requirement, with many getting UDID slots for the price of a cup coffee (or free coffee). Throw in pretty much ever two-bit tech blogger who pays for the opportunity to abuse the NDA at every turn, but man I'm sure they love all those juicy pageviews.

The low cost of entry helps increase those who are considering development, but it has consequences. I'm not sure how those can be avoided. Thus, we have the end result. People who shouldn't be running iOS. Not because it's beta, but because they don't understand the definition of beta. Unfinished software, which can result in a less than stable device.
Could Apple not disable posting app reviews from an iOS 7 device? It would stop most of the
Noobies?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
 

richardya

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#8
The same way there is no way to stop developers from getting their friends to post positive reviews, sadly, there is no way to stop clowns from posting negative reviews. Hopefully, in the end it balances out. Hopefully, the sane will outweigh the insane.
 

chris

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#9
What about allowing developers to respond to reviews? If a customer wrote a bad review, they could respond directly regarding an issue. In most cases, they could respond with: " iOS 7 is in beta and is intended for developers only. When iOS 7 is available to the public, an update will be released that is 100% compatible with iOS 7."

I guess that solves the bad reviews to some extent, but the damage to ratings would still be irreversible.
 

liberated

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#10
This is a non issue for the savvy consumer who would immediately disregard such bad reviews as white noise. This does affect the star rating system negatively. Annoying all the way around.
 
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iPutz

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#11
Anyone with half a brain reads through the reviews thoroughly and they will realize a sudden group of bad postings in a short space of time is usually related to an iOS update and discounts them as unreliable.


Sent using my iPhone 5
 

IllusionEntity

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#12
What about allowing developers to respond to reviews? If a customer wrote a bad review, they could respond directly regarding an issue. In most cases, they could respond with: " iOS 7 is in beta and is intended for developers only. When iOS 7 is available to the public, an update will be released that is 100% compatible with iOS 7."

I guess that solves the bad reviews to some extent, but the damage to ratings would still be irreversible.
I think this would be a problem solved.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
 

fearofnormalcy

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#13
When I showed my friend my 4S running the first beta, he DEMANDED that I have my (actual) developer friend register his iPhone 5's UDID.

I said it's buggy. Terribly so, actually. He didn't care.
I told him it's generally not a good idea to put a beta on your "daily driver" phone. He didn't care. He HAD to have it.

I warned him that a lot of apps wouldn't be compatible. Still NEEDED it on his phone.

I said okay, and got him registered and upgraded.

He's called me about four times complaining about dropped wifi issues, Vine not working (really?), and random resprings and crashes.

I hang up the phone on him in silence every time.
 

Europa

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#14
When I showed my friend my 4S running the first beta, he DEMANDED that I have my (actual) developer friend register his iPhone 5's UDID.

I said it's buggy. Terribly so, actually. He didn't care.
I told him it's generally not a good idea to put a beta on your "daily driver" phone. He didn't care. He HAD to have it.

I warned him that a lot of apps wouldn't be compatible. Still NEEDED it on his phone.

I said okay, and got him registered and upgraded.

He's called me about four times complaining about dropped wifi issues, Vine not working (really?), and random resprings and crashes.

I hang up the phone on him in silence every time.
Does he know that he can restore to 6.1.4?
 

richardya

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#17
What about allowing developers to respond to reviews?
This actually would create more problems. You're assuming the developer is rational and reasonable and that the reviewer is sane. In reality, devs would be sensitive and respond to too many reviews and reviewers would not be happy with devs getting the last word. People would change their reviews and you would end up with YouTube level comment wars. Chaos.Trusting the dev to decide when a reviewer is "wrong or unfair" is a lot of power for a person, who is pretty partial, to have.

Go with the percentages that the sane outweigh the insane. I am sure this is asked of Apple every WWDC and they don't entertain the thought.
 

Europa

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#18
This actually would create more problems. You're assuming the developer is rational and reasonable and that the reviewer is sane. In reality, devs would be sensitive and respond to too many reviews and reviewers would not be happy with devs getting the last word. People would change their reviews and you would end up with YouTube level comment wars. Chaos.Trusting the dev to decide when a reviewer is "wrong or unfair" is a lot of power for a person, who is pretty partial, to have.

Go with the percentages that the sane outweigh the insane. I am sure this is asked of Apple every WWDC and they don't entertain the thought.
Allowing developer responses doesn't necessarily have to cause chaos. Their feedback is usually much different from anonymous YouTube comments. I think most developers would respond fairly and professionally since their behavior and responses could influence app sales and future reviews.

Can you edit old App Store reviews? I didn't think you could. If the developer acknowledges the problems and says a fix is on the way, explains how their app doesn't work properly on betas or outdated hardware or offers suggestions, I don't think most people would get angry. If they do, I don't think their responses would impact downloads or lead to comment wars. Most developers would probably just ignore that.
 

acosmichippo

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#19
yes, you only get one review per app. If you go to review the same app twice, your old review will show up for you to update.
 
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acosmichippo

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#20
I don't think I've ever read an Appstore review. Ever.
I don't think the problem is so much the written reviews as the star ratings. Granted, I do take them with a grain of salt, but generally if I find a couple similar apps, I'll try the higher-rated one first.

This is why allowing developer responses will be a waste of time, in my opinion. Writing out a response is all well and good, but if it doesn't cause the user to change their star rating, it doesn't matter. Furthermore, it's quite a tedious task to make devs read through all their bad reviews and reply to them. I just don't see it actually being done on a scale that would change anything.

The real issue is that the betas are way too easy for laypeople to install, although I'm not sure what the solution to that is...