Charge your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus faster by using iPad power adapter

|3are

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#2
I've been using the extension (wall plug) from an old MacBook with the iPad power adapter for a long time now to charge my iPads and my iPhone 5. It is much faster than the standard iPhone charger plugged into the wall or a computer.

I charged up my 6+ this way Sunday night and went from 4% up to 100% in two hours or so. Yesterday, I used the iPhone charger plugged into an outlet to go from 75% to 100% and it took an hour or longer.

That's been my experience. I'm convinced the iPad charger is faster.
 

Rafagon

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#3
I've been using the extension (wall plug) from an old MacBook with the iPad power adapter for a long time now to charge my iPads and my iPhone 5. It is much faster than the standard iPhone charger plugged into the wall or a computer.

I charged up my 6+ this way Sunday night and went from 4% up to 100% in two hours or so. Yesterday, I used the iPhone charger plugged into an outlet to go from 75% to 100% and it took an hour or longer.

That's been my experience. I'm convinced the iPad charger is faster.
You've done this with your iPhone 5? Has this been deleterious to your battery's health in any way? Just FYI, I read in the Business Insider article that I linked to in my original post that:

"As far as we can tell, it's been possible to use an iPad charger to charge the iPhone before now, but doing so may have risked the longevity of your battery."
I've never an owned an iPad, so I myself have never tried this method.
 

|3are

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#4
I couldn't tell you if it was harmful or not, really. I think my battery was holding up just fine. If I never bothered to plug it in during the day, I could still get home in the evening with 40% or so left. However, I work at an office in front of a computer all day, so I always have the ability to plug in my phone and would usually top off the battery while at work. I've had the 5 since it launched.
 

Zzz

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#5
I have always tried to use the iPad charger to charge my iPhone's. I agree that it charges the iPhone much faster. I notice the iPhone gets a little warmer then when charging with the regular iPhone charger, but not too bad.


Sent from my iPhone 6 using iCafe App.
 

Sassytallsista

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#6
I have always tried to use the iPad charger to charge my iPhone's. I agree that it charges the iPhone much faster. I notice the iPhone gets a little warmer then when charging with the regular iPhone charger, but not too bad.


Sent from my iPhone 6 using iCafe App.

DITTO


Sent using iCafe app
 

fury

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#7
Can confirm; one of my external batteries has a 2.4 amp out port, and my iPhone 6 charged up from 28% to 90% in the span of a 50 minute class.

You could always use the 2.1 and 2.4 amp chargers to charge the iPhone, but until the 6, it only ever drew 1 amp (the same as its own charger). Now that the batteries are bigger, they can more safely draw more current.
 

Europa

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#8
Can confirm; one of my external batteries has a 2.4 amp out port, and my iPhone 6 charged up from 28% to 90% in the span of a 50 minute class.

You could always use the 2.1 and 2.4 amp chargers to charge the iPhone, but until the 6, it only ever drew 1 amp (the same as its own charger). Now that the batteries are bigger, they can more safely draw more current.
So it is completely safe for the long-term health of the battery in the iPhone 6 and an iPhone 6 Plus to frequently use a 10 watt charger?
 

Sharunda

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#9
So it is completely safe for the long-term health of the battery in the iPhone 6 and an iPhone 6 Plus to frequently use a 10 watt charger?
Yes, I was wondering this also, so I called Apple and told the rep I was using the 10W charger on my iPhone 6+ and it charged it so fast and I wanted to make sure this was not going to damage my iPhone. She told me that it is perfectly fine to charge the 6 and the 6+ with the 10W charger. Of course the benefit is a faster charge and there is no damage to the iPhone 6/6+'s battery by using this charger.

She further instructed me to not let the battery die down and then charge it back up from zero on a regular basis. It's fine to charge it throughout the day to keep it at 100% or as high as you can get it. Cycling the battery about once a month is preferable but not several times throughout the month.
 
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WallyG

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Yes, I was wondering this also, so I called Apple and told the rep I was using the 10W charger on my iPhone 6+ and it charged it so fast and I wanted to make sure this was not going to damage my iPhone. She told me that it is perfectly fine to charge the 6 and the 6+ with the 10W charger. Of course the benefit is a faster charge and there is no damage to the iPhone 6/6+'s battery by using this charger.

She further instructed me to not let the battery die down and then charge it back up from zero on a regular basis. It's fine to charge it throughout the day to keep it at 100% or as high as you can get it. Cycling the battery about once a month is preferable but not several times throughout the month.
The iPhone, iPad, and most electronics of this nature have built in chargers that have a charging profile that matches the type of battery contained in the device. The 10W unit you are using is not a "charger". It is a power supply that supplies 5V with a maximum output of 2A. (Power =Voltage X Current). You could use a 1000W charger and it would not damage the iPhone's battery since the charging profile of the internal charger controls the charging rate and maximum battery voltage at end of charge.

If you use an external power supply that doesn't supply enough current to the devices (i.e. a 1W charger). it will take much longer to charge the battery. This is why you are seeing a faster charge with the 10W since it is supplying enough current to meet the internal charger's current profile.

Walt
 

Sharunda

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#11
The iPhone, iPad, and most electronics of this nature have built in chargers that have a charging profile that matches the type of battery contained in the device. The 10W unit you are using is not a "charger". It is a power supply that supplies 5V with a maximum output of 2A. (Power =Voltage X Current). You could use a 1000W charger and it would not damage the iPhone's battery since the charging profile of the internal charger controls the charging rate and maximum battery voltage at end of charge.

If you use an external power supply that doesn't supply enough current to the devices (i.e. a 1W charger). it will take much longer to charge the battery. This is why you are seeing a faster charge with the 10W since it is supplying enough current to meet the internal charger's current profile.

Walt
Hey Walt, Welcome to the eiC Forum! Great first post! Thank you for explaining the How and Why of the charging with the 10W charger vs the 5W and how it's not dangerous at all. Now I know I can only expect that a 12W charger would be faster yet.

I do appreciate your contribution. I wouldn't have gotten that info from the Apple Rep on the phone.

Thanks again!!
 

WallyG

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Hey Walt, Welcome to the eiC Forum! Great first post! Thank you for explaining the How and Why of the charging with the 10W charger vs the 5W and how it's not dangerous at all. Now I know I can only expect that a 12W charger would be faster yet.

I do appreciate your contribution. I wouldn't have gotten that info from the Apple Rep on the phone.

Thanks again!!
Thanks Sharunda!

I'm an Electronics Engineer that designs Silicon Chips and have designed among other things battery charger circuits. I've actually been on the iCafe site many times and learned a lot, so I thought I would sign on and start paying back with anything I can help with.

Walt
 

Sharunda

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#13
Thanks Sharunda!

I'm an Electronics Engineer that designs Silicon Chips and have designed among other things battery charger circuits. I've actually been on the iCafe site many times and learned a lot, so I thought I would sign on and start paying back with anything I can help with.

Walt
{{{{{WALT!!}}}} Well, Well, Well, a professional Electronics Engineer in the HOUSE!!!! Honored to have you here Sir. Thank you for not cracking up at our, or my ignorance. You may have gotten a great chuckle off of that post and decided you had to explain it so I appreciate you sharing your expertise!

Oh, and Did you get the iPhone 6 or 6+? Are you a Bigger than Bigger convert?

Also, glad you decided to join and post. Hope to see you posting around a lot more soon.
 

WallyG

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{{{{{WALT!!}}}} Well, Well, Well, a professional Electronics Engineer in the HOUSE!!!! Honored to have you here Sir.
Sir and Honored not required! I had to do something for a living...;)

Thank you for not cracking up at our, or my ignorance. You may have gotten a great chuckle off of that post and decided you had to explain it so I appreciate you sharing your expertise!
Your not the first person to think that the 5/10/12W block is the charger. It's a natural assumption. The USB ports on your computer are also power supplies that provide a regulated 5V at some rated current level, plus data transfer.


Oh, and Did you get the iPhone 6 or 6+? Are you a Bigger than Bigger convert?.
I have an "the new" iPad that I use mostly for displaying sheet music and right now an iPhone 5. My wife has the mini and the iPhone 5. I ordered a iPhone 6+ last Thursday from Verizon (should have ordered directly from Apple?), but will keep using the iPad. My wife will be ordering an iPhone 6+ in Dec when her contract expires. She doesn't see any reason for keeping the mini once she gets the 6+and will probably ebay it.

For my birthday last Aug, she bought me an Apple Watch, whenever it comes out and if I want it. BTW, I shouldn't say this since I might get thrown off the forum, but I'm a PC guy, (4 Windoz computers for my home consulting company and music support), but hopefully I will be forgiven since I have a lot of iStuff. (My wife has an 27" iMac.. but I still love her :rolleyes:

Walt
 

Cjvdh

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#15
Sir and Honored not required! I had to do something for a living...;)



Your not the first person to think that the 5/10/12W block is the charger. It's a natural assumption. The USB ports on your computer are also power supplies that provide a regulated 5V at some rated current level, plus data transfer.




I have an "the new" iPad that I use mostly for displaying sheet music and right now an iPhone 5. My wife has the mini and the iPhone 5. I ordered a iPhone 6+ last Thursday from Verizon (should have ordered directly from Apple?), but will keep using the iPad. My wife will be ordering an iPhone 6+ in Dec when her contract expires. She doesn't see any reason for keeping the mini once she gets the 6+and will probably ebay it.

For my birthday last Aug, she bought me an Apple Watch, whenever it comes out and if I want it. BTW, I shouldn't say this since I might get thrown off the forum, but I'm a PC guy, (4 Windoz computers for my home consulting company and music support), but hopefully I will be forgiven since I have a lot of iStuff. (My wife has an 27" iMac.. but I still love her :rolleyes:

Walt
I always try and order directly through apple as they have proven to be the most realible. Welcon to EiC
 

fury

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#16
So it is completely safe for the long-term health of the battery in the iPhone 6 and an iPhone 6 Plus to frequently use a 10 watt charger?
Yes, I was wondering this also, so I called Apple and told the rep I was using the 10W charger on my iPhone 6+ and it charged it so fast and I wanted to make sure this was not going to damage my iPhone. She told me that it is perfectly fine to charge the 6 and the 6+ with the 10W charger. Of course the benefit is a faster charge and there is no damage to the iPhone 6/6+'s battery by using this charger.

She further instructed me to not let the battery die down and then charge it back up from zero on a regular basis. It's fine to charge it throughout the day to keep it at 100% or as high as you can get it. Cycling the battery about once a month is preferable but not several times throughout the month.
This is the same answer as I got when I spoke with Apple about it. Looks like they're well-prepared for the question and have had it in their scripts from day one.

I wish I knew more about the science behind it, but from what I understand it's almost like filling an ice cube tray. Your battery generally doesn't charge up evenly, it quickly fills up an individual "cube" (or group of cubes) until it's roughly full, and then fills up the next, and so on and so forth. Then it goes through and tops each one up to the fill line during the "slow" charge part of the process. The iPhone 5S had a certain size "tray", and the 6 and 6 plus have bigger "trays" and take longer to fill up with the same flow, so they designed it to take a higher amount of current (another faucet, or a bigger faucet, or something like that). Best as I can gather, it's to fill more cells at the same time. This is akin to why the iPad 3 and 4 had to be designed to draw up to 12w due to their much larger batteries taking too long to charge at 10w. Now that there's more cells into which to put the juice, they can safely handle the higher current.

I've read from a few sources that there is a negative effect on the longevity of the battery if you go higher than a charging rate of 1C (which, unless I'm mistaken, means that you are supplying enough current to it to fully charge in 1 hour). The iPhone charging circuitry is still comfortably below a 1C charge rate since it still takes 1.5-2 hours to recharge even with a 12w source.

Everything I've read agrees that it is best to do short charges (e.g. 60-80% ten times is less harsh on it than 0-100% twice), and I would surmise that this means more for your battery longevity over the course of a year or two than anything else you can do. Also, don't charge it while hot--which the iPhone prevents you from doing anyway.

The iPhone, iPad, and most electronics of this nature have built in chargers that have a charging profile that matches the type of battery contained in the device. The 10W unit you are using is not a "charger". It is a power supply that supplies 5V with a maximum output of 2A. (Power =Voltage X Current). You could use a 1000W charger and it would not damage the iPhone's battery since the charging profile of the internal charger controls the charging rate and maximum battery voltage at end of charge.

If you use an external power supply that doesn't supply enough current to the devices (i.e. a 1W charger). it will take much longer to charge the battery. This is why you are seeing a faster charge with the 10W since it is supplying enough current to meet the internal charger's current profile.
Thanks for adding your expertise into the mix! I've always wanted to hear it from someone who works on this kinda stuff for a living.

BTW, I shouldn't say this since I might get thrown off the forum, but I'm a PC guy, (4 Windoz computers for my home consulting company and music support), but hopefully I will be forgiven since I have a lot of iStuff. (My wife has an 27" iMac.. but I still love her :rolleyes:
Nothing wrong with being a PC guy. Use what you like/what serves you best. I have 3 or 4 PCs, more phones & tablets than good pairs of pants, and a Mac. I don't even know what guy I am.
 

Njshoremom4gurlz

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#17
I have it haven't used it yet... Good to know! I use it for the mini and iPad
 
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Just read this article on MacRumors, and decided to try it. I walked away for 12-13 minutes while I fed my dog and got myself food. It was at 66 percent. I came back, it's at 86%. Insane!
 

radtechy

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#19
Does the phone stop charging why it's full? Cause if I charge when I go to bed it will be plugged in for a long time.

If that's a problem I could always charge it before I go to sleep if it's gonna be that fast. But I'm really curious if it makes a difference either way
 

AndersJ

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#20
I do this. They actually recommended it to me at apple store today. Works great.