Class action against Apple over "exaggerated" storage capacities

Rafagon

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#1
A class action has been levied against Apple and filed in a U.S. District Court in Northern California by two turdloaves residing in Miami, Florida, namely, Paul Orshan and Christopher Endara.

They take issue with the amount of storage space left over for customer use with iOS 8 installed versus the amount of storage space advertised for a given iDevice.

They can't say that Apple wasn't crystal clear about it, though. As has been humorously noted by the plaintiffs' attorneys, Apple made no secret that iOS 8 was “The biggest iOS release ever.”

More:

Forbes: Running Out of Storage On Your iPhone? There's A Lawsuit For That

International Business Times: Apple iOS 8 Lawsuit: iPhone, iPad Storage Capacity Greatly Exaggerated, Class Action Claims

Apple_iOS_8_The_biggest_iOS_release_ever_coming_soon.jpg
 
Dec 15, 2008
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#2
As always, people will do a lot for money, in this case sue for a stupid reason.
 

MrMike6by9

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#3
I saw this on Reddit earlier today and commented that no one should forget the thing about formatted versus unformatted capacities of storage devices. On the other hand, I agree with others who've previously said that Apple should have made the 32GB iPhone the new entry level model instead of eliminating 32GB as an available option.
YMMV
 

acosmichippo

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#4
they do have a decent point here:

“...[a]t present, Apple does not enable users who have upgraded to iOS 8 to revert back to iOS 7 or another operating system.”

if people are legitimately upset that they will lose a few hundred MB's after updating to ios8 (or any other reason, really), they should be able to downgrade. too bad it will get overlooked amongst all the other BS.
 

Rafagon

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#5
As well as what acosmichippo just said, I would like to add something that many have long hated—"perma-apps". One of the apps that people have long complained about is the Newsstand app—not simply its presence, but also the fact that it couldn't be placed in a folder. In retrospect, having one inviolable app to deal with was not really that bad; now, we have plenty. With each subsequent release of iOS, Apple has added more and more of these perma-apps.

Instead of the ill-founded class action these dimwits and their lawyers have started, a class action against Apple that I would actually enjoy seeing is one against perma-apps. We should have the ability to delete any app that is not essential to the proper functioning of iOS if we should so desire. And we should also have the ability to re-instal them on a whim.

On OS X, if I decide I want to delete something as essential as Safari, I can—so why not on iOS?
 

Rafagon

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#7
commented that no one should forget the thing about formatted versus unformatted capacities of storage devices.
[emphasis mine]

Just to clarify, storage capacity used up by iOS (and therefore not available for customer use) has nothing to do with formatted vs. unformatted capacities.

It starts out with the capacity of the actual chips in the phone, which is the amount advertised (16 GB, for example).

Then, formatting, which happens before the phone ever reaches the user, reduces that space by a given amount.

After formatting, installing the operating system (iOS 8), which also happens before the phone reaches the user, further decreases the amount of space available to the user.

If a user updates the version of iOS on his or her phone, from, say, iOS 8.0 to iOS 9.0, the capacity available to him or her can be decreased yet again, assuming the new version of the operating system takes up more space than the previous one (and this is almost always, if not always, the case).

Apple's current disclaimer ("1GB = 1 billion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.") addresses the issue of formatting and the associated reduction in available space, but makes no mention of storage space required for use by iOS.
 

Ledsteplin

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#8
[emphasis mine]

Just to clarify, storage capacity used up by iOS (and therefore not available for customer use) has nothing to do with formatted vs. unformatted capacities.

It starts out with the capacity of the actual chips in the phone, which is the amount advertised (16 GB, for example).

Then, formatting, which happens before the phone ever reaches the user, reduces that space by a given amount.

After formatting, installing the operating system (iOS 8), which also happens before the phone reaches the user, further decreases the amount of space available to the user.

If a user updates the version of iOS on his or her phone, from, say, iOS 8.0 to iOS 9.0, the capacity available to him or her can be decreased yet again, assuming the new version of the operating system takes up more space than the previous one (and this is almost always, if not always, the case).

Apple's current disclaimer ("1GB = 1 billion bytes; actual formatted capacity less.") addresses the issue of formatting and the associated reduction in available space, but makes no mention of storage space required for use by iOS.
Have you calculated the number of updates before users have 0 gb of available space on the 16 gb devices? And are 256 gb devices just over the horizon?
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1420602385.317475.jpg



Sent from CrapaTalk on my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
 
Dec 15, 2008
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#9
Have you calculated the number of updates before users have 0 gb of available space on the 16 gb devices? And are 256 gb devices just over the horizon?
Sent from CrapaTalk on my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
My friend texted my today very upset with Apple. She has the 16 GB iPhone 6+ with only 90 MB left. I still have 6 GB left and she is wondering how.
 

Europa

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#10
they do have a decent point here:

“...[a]t present, Apple does not enable users who have upgraded to iOS 8 to revert back to iOS 7 or another operating system.”

if people are legitimately upset that they will lose a few hundred MB's after updating to ios8 (or any other reason, really), they should be able to downgrade. too bad it will get overlooked amongst all the other BS.
I can think of two reasons we can't downgrade. Because of these, I seriously doubt we will see an approved option for downgrading anytime soon. I think it more likely that a jailbreak developer would find another way to enable unauthorized downgrading. However, from what I hear, that would be extremely difficult and unlikely. We had a loophole in the past (SHSH blobs), but Apple eventually blocked that.

1. Jailbreaking. If we can downgrade, we can jailbreak when a jailbreak for the current firmware is unavailable. Apple is strongly opposed to jailbreaking because they lose money through app piracy and it can decrease the stability and battery life of their devices.

2. Apple uses the number of devices that are running current firmware as a selling point. There is huge difference in the percentage of devices that are running the latest OS when you compare iOS to Android. At every Keynote, Apple lists these percentages (and pokes a bit of fun at the competition). iOS is usually in the 80s and Android around the 40s, if I remember correctly. Many of the Android models are never eligible for a big upgrade, whereas Apple continues to support their older models for several years. Of course, you get to a point that lag is inevitable, but at least they have access to many of the latest features, unlike the competition. If Apple allowed downgrading, they couldn't say definitively that each device that was upgraded was still running current firmware and that percentage that means so much to them would drop.

Because of the lag and storage space problems, I agree with you that it is unfair that users cannot downgrade. I also think a 16 GB should no longer be offered. The base model should be 32 GB. It's just too difficult to manage 16 GB (it's actually only about 12 GB) on the current models. It was a lot easier before we had a camera that takes fairly large photos and HD video recording capabilities. And if they are anywhere near capacity, they won't even be able to update OTA.
 

Rafagon

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#11
My friend texted my today very upset with Apple. She has the 16 GB iPhone 6+ with only 90 MB left. I still have 6 GB left and she is wondering how.
Did you tell her how to look up what's using how much space by going to Settings, etc..? There's always a rational explanation. :)
 
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#12
Did you tell her how to look up what's using how much space by going to Settings, etc..? There's always a rational explanation. :)
Yes, but part of it could be her iCloud usage. She doesn't have many songs or apps.
 

Europa

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#13
My friend texted my today very upset with Apple. She has the 16 GB iPhone 6+ with only 90 MB left. I still have 6 GB left and she is wondering how.
Yes, but part of it could be her iCloud usage. She doesn't have many songs or apps.
What does iCloud usage have to do with it? iCloud storage is completely different from iPhone storage space. iCloud storage isn't going to eat into storage on the device. I would have done as Rafagon suggested and showed her how to determine what's using so much space on the device. It's likely her camera roll and the text messaging app. If it is, explain to her how to sync photos and videos to her computer so she can delete them and to how to clear her messaging app.
 
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#14
What does iCloud usage have to do with it? iCloud storage is completely different from iPhone storage space. iCloud storage isn't going to eat into storage on the device. I would have done as Rafagon suggested and showed her how to determine what's using so much space on the device. It's likely her camera roll and the text messaging app. If it is, explain to her how to sync photos and videos to her computer so she can delete them and to how to clear her messaging app.
Yes, I suggested to her to use Dropbox, which I use. She said she'll try that out.

She is sound asleep now. :)
 

liberated

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#15
I had a friend with the same problem, turns out as Europa stated, he had thousands of pictures in the messages app and tons of video he took while on vacation. He refused to get anything larger than 16GB because he did not "save songs" to his device.
 

MrMike6by9

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#16
[emphasis mine]

Just to clarify, storage capacity used up by iOS (and therefore not available for customer use) has nothing to do with formatted vs. unformatted capacities.
...
Just to clarify, MY use of formatted vs. unformatted capacities of hard drives was to be illustrative of what Apple could have done in "full disclosure" to the prospective buyer. Apple never says something akin to "the amount of space available to the user excludes [formatting]" or the OS in this case, like hard drive markers all seem obligated to do. My point was that Apple could/should have made such a disclaimer rather than merely offering a size so clearly unsuitable for most First World buyers.
 

Ledsteplin

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#17
A 16 gb phone is manageable for most people as long as they don't want a zillion songs on it. I've been doing it for 17 months. I have 141 downloaded apps, 266 photos currently on my phone ( I keep most photos and all videos on Box,Dropbox and OneDrive), but only 32 songs in my music library. I do use the music app radio stations, TuneIn radio, Radio Paradise and Spotify. I have 4.2 gb available. I keep my messages and emails deleted.


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#18
A 16 gb phone is manageable for most people as long as they don't want a zillion songs on it. I've been doing it for 17 months. I have 141 downloaded apps, 266 photos currently on my phone ( I keep most photos and all videos on Box,Dropbox and OneDrive), but only 32 songs in my music library. I do use the music app radio stations, TuneIn radio, Radio Paradise and Spotify. I have 4.2 gb available. I keep my messages and emails deleted.


Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.
I have like 550 songs, photos in dropbox, 55 apps (I assume that includes stock apps, yeah...), I keep text messages from people I text daily. No photos on the actual iPhone. I have 6 GB left from 16 GB.
 

Rafagon

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#19
I want to play, too :)

I have 665 songs, 14 videos, 264 photos, 59 apps, and that hast left me with 37.8 GB on my 64 GB 6 Plus (usable capacity: 55.7 GB).

about1.jpg (click/enlarge)


Also, I'm wondering why a word game that itself oocupies 66.6 MB of space… needs to keep 142 MB of Documents & Data???

I'm going to try uninstalling/re-installing. The app is obviously not toilet-trained. It's taking dumps all over the place and NOT cleaning up after itself:

wwfdocdata.jpg (click/enlarge)
 

Ledsteplin

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#20
I have like 550 songs, photos in dropbox, 55 apps (I assume that includes stock apps, yeah...), I keep text messages from people I text daily. No photos on the actual iPhone. I have 6 GB left from 16 GB.
Why do you keep text messages? I mean like all of them? I get saving some that are important or sentimental. But all of them? Even those that say, "K"?


Sent from my ancient but trustworthy iPhone 5.