Completely discharging battery then re-charge

cfarag

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Jul 1, 2007
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#1
Is this a good idea? Apple's website says that its good to run a full cycle charge once a month to the keep the electrons moving. Its my understanding a full cycle charge is using the battery down to 0% and then charging it back up again to 100%.

Others say you should never completely drain a Lithium battery as it may reduce its capacity. I'm confused; should I drain it completely once a month to properly maintain it?
 

JnC

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Jun 17, 2007
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#2
I'm confused; should I drain it completely once a month to properly maintain it?
Yes, this is fine. But don't make that the norm (ie, drain it every time prior to a charge) like you would a NiCd battery.

If you do discharge it completely to where the iPhone shuts off, immediately put it on a charger afterwards. Don't allow the battery to sit around for a protracted amount of time with no charge.

I don't think it's so much for battery conditioning as the Li-Ion shouldn't require it, more like recalibration of the battery monitoring algorithm. At least, that's how it works on the Apple notebooks.
 

iPhobos

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Jul 25, 2007
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#3
I have been wondering the same thing. I bought one of the original iPods back in 2001 when they first came out and was instructed to run the battery down until you received the warning message or as close as you could get to that point and then plug it back in. Sence that iPod is still in working condition and everyone else i know that is a different generation and needed a new battery already i figured i would continue the same strategy with my iPhone.

Run till 5% remains and plug it in for a full cycle.
 

SmartAlx

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Jun 7, 2007
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#5
It IS a good idea to do this but I'm not so sure about the electrons thing. What this does is recalibrate the battery meter to make sure you get a genuine full charge.
 

havoc234

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Jul 27, 2007
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#8
you know...

just do the cycle thing once every couple months you really don't need to do that on such a set schedule as once a month. I own a launch macbook pro and a nano which they all use the same kind of battery material and never have had any issue with charge degrading a lot over normal use or weird battery problems. on the macbook pro i know for sure because the maximum charge at full in the display meter hasn't really went down at all since I bought it.

then again I suppose yeah once a month is optimum condition for battery....which is good to know but it's probably gonna be the same anyway.
 

AngelJO008

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Jun 20, 2007
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#9
Yes, this is fine. But don't make that the norm (ie, drain it every time prior to a charge) like you would a NiCd battery.

If you do discharge it completely to where the iPhone shuts off, immediately put it on a charger afterwards. Don't allow the battery to sit around for a protracted amount of time with no charge.

I don't think it's so much for battery conditioning as the Li-Ion shouldn't require it, more like recalibration of the battery monitoring algorithm. At least, that's how it works on the Apple notebooks.
actually, if you drain a Li-Ion battery completely, a chemical reaction occurs damaging the battery. Simply recharging it will not save it. If it has been completely drained, you may never get it recharged and if you do, it won't be near the same charge as it once had. My point, Li-Ion should be topped off daily, never drained completely.
 

Tinman

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Jul 16, 2007
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#10
In electrical flow, electrons are the only things that move.
The discussion is about a battery, and in that light the above comment is not true. Lithium ions are moving inside the iPhone's battery (between the anode and cathode).

Electrons don't exist till the chemical reaction that creates them begins. So to say it's to "keep the electrons moving" is pretty childlike, IMO. Funny though...


--
Mike
 

SmartAlx

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#11
Electrons don't exist till the chemical reaction that creates them begins.
Sorry to call you out on that, but can you clarify what you meant? If it has an atom (if it's matter), it has electrons.
 

SmartAlx

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#12
actually, if you drain a Li-Ion battery completely, a chemical reaction occurs damaging the battery. Simply recharging it will not save it. If it has been completely drained, you may never get it recharged and if you do, it won't be near the same charge as it once had. My point, Li-Ion should be topped off daily, never drained completely.
http://batteryuniversity.com/parttwo-38.htm
To calibrate a battery, a full charge and discharge is necessary.
 

Paulshaqz

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Jul 14, 2007
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#13
so basicily charge when its almost or completly drained i no this might a lil diffrent subject but i was curious will this increase the battery to do that full charge flash cuzz mine charges all the way but dosent seem to finish the last full charge wear its supost to flash?
 

Tinman

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#15
Sorry to call you out on that, but can you clarify what you meant? If it has an atom (if it's matter), it has electrons.
I wrote that in the context of battery operation. I'm guessing you don't need that clarified, but if so go here:

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/battery.htm

"Batteries are all over the place -- in our cars, our PCs, laptops, portable MP3 players and cell phones. A battery is essentially a can full of chemicals that produce electrons..."


--
Mike
 

SmartAlx

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#16
I wrote that in the context of battery operation. I'm guessing you don't need that clarified, but if so go here:

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/battery.htm

"Batteries are all over the place -- in our cars, our PCs, laptops, portable MP3 players and cell phones. A battery is essentially a can full of chemicals that produce electrons..."


--
Mike
To be more accurate, it should say that a battery creates the FLOW of electrons. Nothing is created.
 

theraker007

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Jun 15, 2007
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#17
The discussion is about a battery, and in that light the above comment is not true. Lithium ions are moving inside the iPhone's battery (between the anode and cathode).

Electrons don't exist till the chemical reaction that creates them begins. So to say it's to "keep the electrons moving" is pretty childlike, IMO. Funny though...


--
Mike

Im sorry, I have a degree in chemistry and you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. What do you think ions are? lol

seriously, until the reaction that 'creates' them? you cant create electrons in a reaction, thats a ridiculous statement. Do a little research before you call someone out on stuff over your head
 

Tinman

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#18
Im sorry, I have a degree in chemistry and you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. What do you think ions are? lol

seriously, until the reaction that 'creates' them? you cant create electrons in a reaction, thats a ridiculous statement. Do a little research before you call someone out on stuff over your head
"Call someone out?" I didn't call anyone out.

Please, read it in context before you start your insults. I didn't mean the electrons were created out of thin air. I know what matter consists of and how batteries operate. It ain't rocket surgery. That said I admit the choice of the word "create" was poor.



--
Mike
 

theraker007

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#20
"Call someone out?" I didn't call anyone out.

Please, read it in context before you start your insults. I didn't mean the electrons were created out of thin air. I know what matter consists of and how batteries operate. It ain't rocket surgery. That said I admit the choice of the word "create" was poor.



--
Mike

you called the article childlike, exerting your superior knowledge, im simply pointing out that your word choice is even worse than his