Could this be the answer to the next leap in Medicine?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by liberated, May 10, 2015.

  1. liberated

    liberated Genius
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  2. Europa

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    I wonder how that works without electrodes on the limbs and the chest. There's a big difference between a pulse monitor and a 12 lead EKG. I can see how it could detect A-fib, but I don't see how it could detect ST changes associated with an MI.
     
  3. Napoleon PhoneApart

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    God, you're incredibly sexy when you talk 12-lead EKGs, A-fib, and dialysis filtration.
     
  4. liberated

    liberated Genius
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    I agree, certainly ST-changes are impossible to detect using the watch, I was thinking more along the lines of heart variability http://m.circ.ahajournals.org/content/94/11/2850.short which also uses cardiac monitor but does not look at ST-Segment but rather rhythm which could be monitored using the watch' heart rate monitoring feature. The watch also has the added advantage in that data for millions vs a few thousand on a typical study could yield insights and trends on a large number of patients that until now we're impossible to obtain. No telling what interesting trends could emerge by just looking at large numbers :) good pickup Europa.
     
  5. Michael Baturin

    Michael Baturin Evangelist
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    I was giving some thought to this over the last few days since seeing and reading that article. Agreed that a simple wrist heart-rate monitor alone wont be able to detect a large percentage of potential heart issues, but how about things such as atrial fibrillation, as discussed in the article? It does not seem far fetched that the Apple Watch, and devices like it, could save lives in the not too distant future.
     
    #5 Michael Baturin, May 11, 2015
    Last edited: May 11, 2015
  6. Europa

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    Because A-fib isn't immediately life threatening and it doesn't typically precede a heart attack. A lot of people live in A-fib, they just have to take anticoagulants. The life threatening heart rhythm changes that precede a fatal heart attack would either be detected by a pulse monitor as a rapid heart rate, an arrhythmia or wouldn't be picked up at all. The watch wouldn't detect a pulse (with a fatal arrythmia), which can happen if it's not making good contact with the skin, wet, etc. Arrhythmias aren't necessarily life threatening. You need electrodes on the chest and limbs to see changes in the electrical heart rhythm that are associated with heart attacks. There's a high probability for false alarms or missing the early changes if you don't have that. I don't think the technology for a watch (with no medical accessories) to predict heart attacks is there yet.
     
  7. Michael Baturin

    Michael Baturin Evangelist
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    Dreams - killed. ;) Joking of course. I'm not a doctor or medical professional of any kind - so I really don't know what's possible. But much higher quantities of data sets seem more likely to yield better insights of some kind.
     
    #7 Michael Baturin, May 11, 2015
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  8. Europa

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    No. I was just saying we aren't there yet, but advancements are being made in this area. Maybe in the future they will implement wireless electrodes (small stickers that aren't cumbersome or very noticeable) that transmit to the watch and monitor the heart rhythm. We can measure cardiac output and other hemodynamics non-invasively with four sensors on the chest now. Initially, that could only be done invasively.
     
  9. liberated

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    Of course as a medical professional and fellow RN I agree. You know? My point is that with the possibility of gathering biometric data on Millions may yield trends that up until now were impossible to obtain and those trends may reveal other ways to predict a major cardiac event. Are we there now? No, but what an encouraging start!
     

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