Does Apple make it easy for government to access our private data?

Mrallank59

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#1
Didn't Apple just patch something that allowed the government to go in and get users info?
My concern is, with the release of the iPhone 6, Apple will have made it so the US government can have easy access to all of our private info.
 

chris

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#2
I think it's actually the opposite. Apple, along with a number of major companies, have all come out in favor of protecting information of their respective customers. Nothing with a new iPhone will change that.
 

Ledsteplin

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#3
I agree with Chris. Why would a new iPhone change anything? Besides, I don't have anything to hide.
 

Rafagon

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#5
I think it's actually the opposite. Apple, along with a number of major companies, have all come out in favor of protecting information of their respective customers. Nothing with a new iPhone will change that.
I think I may want to respectfully disagree with that statement... it is 2014 and technology reigns supreme. Apple could potentially design and install on the new iPhone a near-microscopic chip the function of which even the smartest man or woman at iFixit wouldn't be able to figure out. They could easily store half a megabyte of code on that chip designed to help protect users' private information. They might not even need a dedicated microchip—they could dedicate a tiny portion of an existing chip to do it—like the "secure enclave" that holds our fingerprint data. (Has anyone been able to "crack" the data stored on that secure enclave?)

... Apple will have made it so the US government can have easy access to all of our private info.
If the govenrment wants users' info bad enough, I'm sure they'll find a way to get it. I know this lady who works at the FBI and she can find out anything, even the last time you used the restroom...

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Europa

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#6
I think I may want to respectfully disagree with that statement... it is 2014 and technology reigns supreme. Apple could potentially design and install on the new iPhone a near-microscopic chip the function of which even the smartest man or woman at iFixit wouldn't be able to figure out. They could easily store half a megabyte of code on that chip designed to help protect users' private information. They might not even need a dedicated microchip—they could dedicate a tiny portion of an existing chip to do it—like the "secure enclave" that holds our fingerprint data. (Has anyone been able to "crack" the data stored on that secure enclave?)



If the govenrment wants users' info bad enough, I'm sure they'll find a way to get it. I know this lady who works at the FBI and she can find out anything, even the last time you used the restroom...

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Ozzie5374

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#7
Loved that movie!
Govt. Hackers. Department stores. The guy out there going through your trash. Cookies. Satellite surveillance. GPS devices in cars. Govt, large companies, Facebook whoever. Welcome to the 21st century. If they want to track my every bowel movement they're most welcome.
 

Europa

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#8
Loved that movie!
Govt. Hackers. Department stores. The guy out there going through your trash. Cookies. Satellite surveillance. GPS devices in cars. Govt, large companies, Facebook whoever. Welcome to the 21st century. If they want to track my every bowel movement they're most welcome.
Many people assume the government will track their every move because they can. The truth is most people are far too boring to warrant being watched.
 

Ozzie5374

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#9
Agreed.
But how do they know if we are too boring?
Anyone who has something to sell, be it a product or a service, has an interest in the market - us. The biggest industry at the moment, I suspect, is the information industry. Information on people, their habits, their likes/dislikes, their lifestyles, their political persuasion etc is worth more than gold to some. And there are a lot of boring people out there who buy lots of things.
 

Ledsteplin

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#11
Agreed.
But how do they know if we are too boring?
Anyone who has something to sell, be it a product or a service, has an interest in the market - us. The biggest industry at the moment, I suspect, is the information industry. Information on people, their habits, their likes/dislikes, their lifestyles, their political persuasion etc is worth more than gold to some. And there are a lot of boring people out there who buy lots of things.
Now you're talking about advertisers. And you're right. They're collecting all kinds of info about all of us so they can better serve us by offering us what we desire in their spam that reaches our inboxes. But Uncle Sam could pretty much care less about most of us, unless we owe them money.
 

flatbacks21

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#12
It's easy to track people now b/c of cell phones.. I wouldn't put anything past government as to who they look at.. You have a phone, easy to tap into your life..
 

Ozzie5374

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#13
Now you're talking about advertisers. And you're right. They're collecting all kinds of info about all of us so they can better serve us by offering us what we desire in their spam that reaches our inboxes. But Uncle Sam could pretty much care less about most of us, unless we owe them money.
Uncle Sam/Governments (I'm in Australia) have their fingers in a lot of pies. Enough said.