Don't set the date on your iPhone (or other 64-bit iDevice) to January 1st, 1970

Discussion in 'iPhone 6S' started by Rafagon, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    #1 Rafagon, Feb 11, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 11, 2016
  2. Napoleon PhoneApart

    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    4,442
    I was waiting for this post.

    Do not, I repeat, do not be a numbskull and try this.

    Jailbroken folks, add this repo: http://repo.ziph0n.com/ and install the BrickingDate tweak. This should prevent anyone from maliciously changing your date manually.

    I'm also editing out mentions of fraud.
     
  3. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    The article calls this "an interesting bug"; I'm calling it a feature.

    This is a security measure put in place by Apple in case someone maliciously sends your iPhone back in time (specifically to January 1st, 1970). When the phone arrives at that date, people there will be unable to access your bricked device, thus preventing access to information from the future which could have deadly results if used improperly.
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • List
  4. Napoleon PhoneApart

    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    4,442
    You and a hundred other people have thought of this.
     
  5. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    If Napoleon and I were not clear and explicit enough, here is the take-away from this thread, according to OSXDaily, in clear and and simple English. I couldn't have worded this better myself.

    "Do not try this yourself, you will ruin the iPhone. That can’t be made more clear, if you try this, you will ruin the iPhone. In other words, do not try this yourself with any iPhone that you care about, unless you don’t mind sending it back to Apple for repair. Doing this will destroy the iPhone and make it inoperable. That means you won’t be able to use the iPhone at all, it will be broken. So we repeat, again, do not try this yourself. Do not try this at home. Do not try this with your iPhone. Do not try this with your friends or anyone elses iPhone. And most importantly, don’t be fooled into trying this by someone else, as there are several ridiculous pranks in the form of various claims circulating on the internet as to what happens if you set the iPhone date far into the past – don’t do it, it breaks the iPhone. This is often referred to as a bricked phone, because the iPhone becomes as useful as brick."
     
  6. Kadelic

    Kadelic Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2010
    Likes Received:
    1,643
    I'm sitting here reading this and thinking "yeah, right, there's no possible way this is legit. I'm going to prove it by setting my 6s to 1/1/1970 to show everyone this is a hoax." And then...something stops me from actually trying it. I don't want to be a numbskull after all. :D
     
  7. Napoleon PhoneApart

    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    4,442
    You don't want to wind up on my numbskull list. I have a few already. :D
     
  8. iPutz

    iPutz Zealot
    Silver

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Likes Received:
    183
    What possible reason would anyone have to reset their date that far back? The article in iClarified did say however that disconnecting and reconnecting the battery would "Un-Brick" the device. True or not I'm not going to try and prove or disprove any of it.
     
  9. Napoleon PhoneApart

    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Likes Received:
    4,442
    Some nerds play with their phones all day hoping to find stuff like this. I guess it gives them something to do until mom delivers their meals to the basement.
     
  10. iPutz

    iPutz Zealot
    Silver

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Likes Received:
    183
    And some nerds are really very long on brains and totally lacking in common sense. Butchya still gotta love 'em if for nothing else than the entertainment value.
     
  11. Europa

    Europa Moderator
    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    5,468
    I heard about this early this morning shortly after it was verified that a DFU restore would not fix it. It's not technically ruined or bricked because it can be fixed by Apple or by opening the device and disconnecting and reconnecting the battery. I imagine it will be a problem with demo units at Apple Stores this weekend. I bet we'll see an iOS update next week.
     
  12. RBNetEngr

    RBNetEngr Contributor
    Bronze

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Likes Received:
    27
    It's interesting that you say this. Does Apple ever force updates out to iPhones? The reason I ask is that when I woke up on Saturday morning (2/13/16) and checked for the time on my iPhone, the screen to enter a pass or was displayed, indicating that I couldn't use TouchID to unlock it because it had been rebooted.

    I thought there was something in Settings that indicates how long the device has been running since the last reboot, but I couldn't find it. And I don't make it a habit of memorizing version numbers, so I don't know if 9.2.1(13D15) is newer than the version running prior to Friday night. But looking in the Diagnostics and Usage files indicates that 9.2.1(13D15) has been the version reported for several items dated over the past few weeks, so that looks like it didn't change.

    There are no Diagnostics and Usage events that are time stamped during the timeframe of 2300 hrs on 2/12/16 and 1000 hrs on 2/13/16.

    Any ideas?
     
  13. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    I've had that happen to me. Please check out this thread: http://forums.everythingicafe.com/threads/touch-id-requires-your-password-after-48-hours%E2%80%A6-bug-makes-it-happen-sooner.108998/
     
  14. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    Never. You have to authorize every iOS software update manually.

    FYI, you do have the option to schedule a pending update to occur automatically during the wee hours of the morning, when you're theoretically sleeping. But even if you select this option for a given update, the next update will not be pushed out to you automatically. You would have to again schedule it for nighttime.

    This free app will show your device's uptime: https://appsto.re/us/S7Cty.i
     
    #14 Rafagon, Feb 14, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
  15. Europa

    Europa Moderator
    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    5,468
    There hasn't been a firmware update yet. Mine does that quite often (requires a passcode even though it hasn't rebooted), but I'm still on 9.0.2.
     
  16. Ledsteplin

    Ledsteplin Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2013
    Likes Received:
    959
    If I check my lock screen and fool with my phone in the dark a bit, there's times touch ID won't work. But it's because of my actions. The phone thinks a thief is messing with it. So then I have to enter the passcode.
     
  17. Europa

    Europa Moderator
    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    5,468
    Touch ID works perfectly fine in the dark.
     
  18. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1,247
    Getting back on topic, MacRumors tells us that "Apple has officially acknowledged the '1970' date bug affecting 64-bit iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices."

    Apple's official statement on the subject is a rather terse one: "Manually changing the date to May 1970 or earlier can prevent your iOS device from turning on after a restart. An upcoming software update will prevent this issue from affecting iOS devices. If you have this issue, contact Apple Support."

    Of course, "upcoming" is a rather vague term, but at least they've said something.

    Hopefully, all of you who read this thread heeded Napoleon's and my warnings in the first few posts and your iDevice is still functioning swimmingly.
     
  19. Ledsteplin

    Ledsteplin Genius
    Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2013
    Likes Received:
    959
    The dark had nothing to do with it. When I first wake in the morning, Touch ID does not work. I get a message to Enter the passcode instead. It's only been happening for the past 4 or 5 mornings. I had thought it was because I was checking my lock screen for the time and notifications a while earlier. But then I saw others saying the same. It's like the 48 hour thing but a different message. I'll skip the screen check in the morning and go straight to Touch ID and see what happens.
     
  20. Europa

    Europa Moderator
    Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Likes Received:
    5,468
    I was referring to your comment about it not working in the dark, not the bug that causes it to randomly require a passcode (when it hasn't been rebooted or 48 hours without usage). You said it sometimes doesn't work in the dark because of your actions.
     

Share This Page