Future iPhone needs to be business oriented too

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aloshka

New Member
May 17, 2007
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#1
I think Apple will realize there is a huge profit potential in the businesss area (Aka blackberries etc). IF they create software that allows the iPhone to sync either via blackberry server, OR activesync, they would make it INCREDIBLY big! Just my two cents, but working in a businesss environment.
 

archer6

New Member
Bronze
May 15, 2007
129
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0
#2
I think Apple will realize there is a huge profit potential in the businesss area (Aka blackberries etc). IF they create software that allows the iPhone to sync either via blackberry server, OR activesync, they would make it INCREDIBLY big! Just my two cents, but working in a businesss environment.
I agree with you.

However Apple's record regarding playing nice with businessses is abysmal.

That in my opinion is why they have such a very slim market share with Apple computers. So slim, that without the iPod to save them they would have been a shadow of their former selves today. In fact I remember the pre-iPod days when it appeared that Apple was in really big trouble. I read somewhere that one of the pundits predicted that Apple would morph into an entertainment company or it would die.

Well, as we all know that is exactly how it turned out. Finalized by the recent name change removing "computer" from the companies name. If it were not for the last gasp attempt with the iPod and bringing Steve Jobs back into the fold, it would have all vaporized.

Thanks to the massive profits brought in by the iPod and iTunes sales, Apple is flush with cash today. This is the only reason they can continue with R&D on the Computer side. We have iPods to thank for the resurrection of Apple laptops, as without the cash to fund further development the PowerBook, now MacBook side would have also died.

I personally am very glad they survived and are growing again, as in businesss you either grow or you die.
 

joe

New Member
Gold
May 5, 2007
1,113
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0
#3
I don't disagree that the iPod in late '01 was huge. It wasn't huge at first but definitely caught on. But before the iPod things had already turned the corner and Apple was no longer in the hole. In fact it was Gil who turned things around and Steve took over a ship that was already back towards the right course. Apple had over $1B in cash in '97 and then released the iMac ('98) which was hugely successful, then OS X in early '01. In fact, if it weren't for the momentum and cash that Apple had at the time, the iPod probably would not have been produced.
 

jpmihalk

Member
Bronze
May 16, 2007
253
3
18
USA
#5
RIM/Blackberry has a good market share for businesss users of email, but their devices as phones have been historically way off the mark. RIM is just now starting to address those shortcomings with devices like the Pearl. The iPhone should blow any Blackberry away as a cell phone.
 

JHMirage

New Member
May 12, 2007
22
0
1
45
Minneapolis, MN
#6
RIM/Blackberry has a good market share for businesss users of email, but their devices as phones have been historically way off the mark. RIM is just now starting to address those shortcomings with devices like the Pearl. The iPhone should blow any Blackberry away as a cell phone.
Exactly. And the Pearl really doesn't go nearly far enough. To make it a better phone, with a better form-factor, they've alienated the people who were die hard fans of the full qwerty keyboard. They're discovering that (surprise!) it's very hard to do it all well.

To be fair, the iPhone won't do it all well, either. The sacrifice Apple decided to make was to get rid of any hard buttons at all and embrace a fully-adaptable UI. In my opinion it was a genius move, and even though I will totally agree that people sending emails on a Blackberry will type much faster and more easily than I will with my iPhone, I can slip mine easily into my jeans pocket when I'm done, or do any number of other things that even users of the Pearl couldn't dream of.

At any rate, I expect that if Apple even made a token effort at supporting real push-email (not Yahoo... I'm talking businesss support like via exchange server, etc.) they'd pull a good portion of Rim's market share.

We'll see... they'd be crazy to not already have that in the works for iPhone 2... whether it sees the light of day is another question.
 

archer6

New Member
Bronze
May 15, 2007
129
0
0
#8
I don't disagree that the iPod in late '01 was huge. It wasn't huge at first but definitely caught on. But before the iPod things had already turned the corner and Apple was no longer in the hole. In fact it was Gil who turned things around and Steve took over a ship that was already back towards the right course. Apple had over $1B in cash in '97 and then released the iMac ('98) which was hugely successful, then OS X in early '01. In fact, if it weren't for the momentum and cash that Apple had at the time, the iPod probably would not have been produced.
You bring up some very good and accurate points here. I stand corrected on the Apple history summary I gave in my post, as obviously your memory of that is more accurate....:)

Reading your post brought it back to me with great clarity, and again I want to establish the fact that I am indeed a big Apple supporter.

Thanks for the great post!
Cheers...
 

archer6

New Member
Bronze
May 15, 2007
129
0
0
#9
RIM/Blackberry has a good market share for businesss users of email, but their devices as phones have been historically way off the mark. RIM is just now starting to address those shortcomings with devices like the Pearl. The iPhone should blow any Blackberry away as a cell phone.
I agree with you completely on the issue of BlackBerry phones being very poor during the initial integration of a phone into a device that was only designed for email communications.

However that is no longer the case as of 2005.

With the introduction of the BlackBerry 8700 model in 2005 the phone became an integrated part of the device and functions quite well. This was a quantum leap in the evolution of a communications device. Supporting EDGE which at the time was the fastest connectivity available it was a market leader.

All the while the target market has remained the corp sector and it's need for reliability and security, two areas that RIM is the expert at. At no time during this period of RIM history did they shift their focus to the public sector. They were so successful and determined to further the technological advancements to meet the changing needs of the businesss sector.

Once demand from the public reached critical mass, RIM then designed the 8100 Pearl. A device specifically targeting the public. One that incorporates a camera and a media player. Requirements that are absent from the businesss sector. Due to the forward thinking of the designers, the Pearl has been huge hit with the public, many of whom buy the phone and use it as a phone and text messaging device only. As they are buying the style and the "cool factor" of the Pearls contemporary design.

As a hard core mobile phone enthusiast that is not "married" to any brand or model, I speak from experience. I have all the latest BlackBerry models, since June of 2006. The 7130c, 8100 Pearl, 8300 Curve (new), 8700c and 8800. These are unlocked and will work on any system that supports GSM. I find them exceptional devices that provide the best functionality, stability and reliability. Far better than the Symbian or Windows Mobile devices I have such as the Moto Q, the Treo, and the Blackjack.

So getting back to the iPhone, as a huge Apple advocate, I'm sure this will be a great device. But to say that the phone component will blow away all the rest including BlackBerry's, is a bit premature and not as likely as portrayed by your post.

Cheers...:)
 

joe

New Member
Gold
May 5, 2007
1,113
0
0
#10
Thanks for the nice comment! And I really appreciate your knowledge of things Blackberry and other smartphones because I think that is very relevant to the issues Apple will face in competing with other products. While I don't think there is competition (iPhone wins!) most others out there will not agree.
 

archer6

New Member
Bronze
May 15, 2007
129
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0
#11
I like the concept of iPhone wins.

However if this was any other brand new unreleased, untested, unproven device I doubt it would get getting such a strong endorsement.

Usually in our society (the very one that created the term "Vaporware") most people take an "I'll believe it when I see it stance."

I certainly like the positive enthusiasm around the iPhone but let's not loose sight of the fact that this device was not even approved by the FCC until yesterday!

Other than the pre-production prototypes, no one has even seen, much less used an iPhone.

So to proclaim it a "winner" at this early juncture is indeed a baseless claim.

I ask myself this question, what compromises are being made to meet the release deadline? What issues are being left unresolved just to get this out the door?

Again, this is not Apple bashing or sour grapes. Quite the contrary it's just common sense thinking combined with observations of past product launches of unknown unproven products.

If all goes well, the above questions will be irrelevant. That would be the optimum situation as I see it, again, I want Apple to be very successful and have this launch go smoothly.

Time will tell.

Cheers...:)
 

joe

New Member
Gold
May 5, 2007
1,113
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#12
So to proclaim it a "winner" at this early juncture is indeed a baseless claim.

...

Quite the contrary it's just common sense thinking combined with observations of past product launches of unknown unproven products.
Well, it is just my opinion, not based in fact, of course, since I haven't even touched one, unless you count the cool paper cut-out pdf I walk around with hoping to fool someone. Aside from the signal, it's still better than my current phone. :p

However, I don't think it is "baseless" or lacking "common sense" to go a step further and recognize the following:

1. While this is a new product, this is Steve Jobs' pride and joy, years in the making. He won't let an unfinished product go out the door.

2. While this is a new product, Apple has quite a bit of experience and can pull this off (see iPod). This is not a start-up company.

3. Most existing products fall short. Based on pure feature set and the demo, this product will surpass most of them in most areas.
 

archer6

New Member
Bronze
May 15, 2007
129
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#13
Well, it is just my opinion, not based in fact, of course, since I haven't even touched one, unless you count the cool paper cut-out pdf I walk around with hoping to fool someone. Aside from the signal, it's still better than my current phone. :p

However, I don't think it is "baseless" or lacking "common sense" to go a step further and recognize the following:

1. While this is a new product, this is Steve Jobs' pride and joy, years in the making. He won't let an unfinished product go out the door.

2. While this is a new product, Apple has quite a bit of experience and can pull this off (see iPod). This is not a start-up company.

3. Most existing products fall short. Based on pure feature set and the demo, this product will surpass most of them in most areas.


I certainly do NOT disagree with you. You have some very valid points here. And I respect your opinion.

In addition, I’m not taking myself or anything is this forum that seriously. It’s all in fun.

The viewpoints I present are real, and just for the fun of sharing ideas, as well as my actual experiences with (the huge number of) Apple products I own.

Sometimes the words used are strong just to make a point or for a "frame of reference".

I reiterate I love Apple Products Period (the good ones). I also should be noted that I have been an Apple customer for a long time. I have used their laptops for a long time, as well as various iPods, desktops, etc.

That said, I'm just looking at this iPhone project from both sides. Like an other pro & con list.

Plus I'm taking into consideration the unique segment of the general population that has "locked onto anything Apple" (much like the "DeadHeads" the follow the long deceased Jerry Garcia) with a blind eye. Turning over their common sense and reason, and turning into lemmings that will follow Apple wherever it goes proclaiming the superiority of anything Apple puts in front of them.

This ends up being quite entertaining and rather laughable in many cases. Again just an observation not a criticism or judgment.

I stand alone, not "married" or loyal beyond reason to any manufacturer, product, brand, or concept.

Here is an excerpt from an article I just came across, along with the source link.

“Apples Cabbage Patch Doll”

Beyond the raw specs, nobody really has a true sense of how the product will work. Apple doesn't usually announce products six months in advance of their official launch. But the company is so practiced in manipulating the message to fire up anticipation

Source: http://news.com.com/Apples+Cabbage+Patch+doll/2010-1041_3-6185054.html?tag=nefd.pulse
 
May 16, 2007
12
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0
#14
teens or suits?

It looks to me that Apple is slanting the iPhone towards teens and twenty-somethings, with its emphasis on music and vidcasts. That may support the view that Blackberry will retain the businesss sector. At the very least, Apple sees the younger generation as an essential part of the iPhone market; perhaps it thinks it can have it all, in a way no other phone mfr. has.

Apple did that with the iPod, of course. What other single electronic product is owned and regularly used by kids, senior citizens, taxi drivers, hedge-fund managers, the president, and the pope?