Good Article

Griffinaz

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Oct 5, 2007
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#2
That would explain Apples attempts to lock the phone against "unauthorized" software installations. They plan on selling the same types of software and if they can find a method to block us from installing freeware they can turn a profit by selling similar software packages. I think that Apple should still provide software for sale for the iPhones but allow us to install what we want also. Then it is up to the software developers and the demand for their individual products on whether or not they want to provide their program for free or work out an agreement with Apple to sell it through iTunes.
I wouldn't have a problem with that.
 

tharmsen

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Jul 5, 2007
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#3
That would explain Apples attempts to lock the phone against "unauthorized" software installations. They plan on selling the same types of software and if they can find a method to block us from installing freeware they can turn a profit by selling similar software packages. I think that Apple should still provide software for sale for the iPhones but allow us to install what we want also. Then it is up to the software developers and the demand for their individual products on whether or not they want to provide their program for free or work out an agreement with Apple to sell it through iTunes.
I wouldn't have a problem with that.
Dude, did you read the article completely? What the author said was it's not about money for Apple, it's about controlling support costs (which Apple is doing itself and not through a partner like most other companies). As he stated, if you write some crappy code and put it on your phone (and post it on the internet) and it bricks your phone, you'll race down to your local Apple store and demand a free replacement. We know this will happen, we've seen countless examples of that right here on this forum... including people who have dropped their phones in the toilet and scam Apple for a free replacement.

I think the idea of having sanctioned 3rd party developers is a good one. As long as the applications don't cost $50 a pop, I'll be happy with the proposed model. Perhaps we'll finally get functions we desire like cut-n-paste, ability to save downloads, etc. from developers since Apple doesn't appear to be too concerned with it.
 

Griffinaz

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Oct 5, 2007
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#4
I think the idea of having sanctioned 3rd party developers is a good one. As long as the applications don't cost $50 a pop, I'll be happy with the proposed model. Perhaps we'll finally get functions we desire like cut-n-paste, ability to save downloads, etc. from developers since Apple doesn't appear to be too concerned with it.
Sorry, No I didn't. I only read up to where they said it was a mistake. After work finally let up I was able to read the rest. I agree with you that sanctioned 3rd party software would be good. My only real concern with this now is who gets to decide what software they will approve for our use? With my PDA there are numerous sites where I can go download a trial version of a program and purchase it if I keep it. Most of the sites I go to have different types of software available that others may not. If Apple limits it to their store only are we stuck with them only approving software that Apple feels is "worthy" of their hardware or will they permit the developers to have free reigns on what type of software products they develop as long as the structure of the software is safe for the OS and functionality of the phones?
 

tharmsen

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Jul 5, 2007
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#5
I guess that's yet to be seen. What I've read indicates that Apple will give the SDK's to a group of trusted developers. I assume other developers will be able to approach Apple for approval as well. The developers will be able to come up with the applications they want to develop and then submit them to Apple for testing and final approval. I don't believe Apple will be telling them what to develop but they will do their own testing to verify the software doesn't do anything to damage the iPhone.
 

iPhone8801

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Sep 22, 2007
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#6
"the company is doing this because it simply doesn't understand smartphone users." - Hardy


So let me get this straight.

They (Apple) made a mistake because they do not understand "smart phone users." However, they consciously limited / restricted third party apps from the iPhone? Please. Don't try to make any publicly traded company look innocent.

Apple knew exactly what they were doing from the get-go.

Steve jobs owns you. Stop crying and mod the iPhone if you want the apps.

I find no human error in Apple's decision.
 

diverdown

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Sep 12, 2007
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#7
"the company is doing this because it simply doesn't understand smartphone users." - Hardy


So let me get this straight.

They (Apple) made a mistake because they do not understand "smart phone users." However, they consciously limited / restricted third party apps from the iPhone? Please. Don't try to make any publicly traded company look innocent.

Apple knew exactly what they were doing from the get-go.

Steve jobs owns you. Stop crying and mod the iPhone if you want the apps.

I find no human error in Apple's decision.
I do not think anybody is crying in this post. I have referred to Brighthand.com over the years and have found their reviews to be very fair and not biased to any one platform. As they are a site that deals specifically with palm and windows based smartphones, I thought it was a fresh perspective on the issue.

I do not think that the article is trying to make Apple appear innocent and I do not think that the writer is trying to say that Apple did not know what they were doing. My take on the article was that the writer felt that Apple has misjudged the targeted user base by not really understanding the exact market that the iPhone is competing in.....

As this is Apple's first foray into this market, mistakes are bound to be made. I have had pretty much every model Palm that was made and while I agree that there are virtually an endless amount of apps, there were not that many must have apps....

Palm, RIM and Microsoft (Win mobile) have experienced their growing pains in this market and now it is Apple's turn. We shall see how they handle it....the solution proposed in the article is a pretty good compromise and for those that feel that it's just another way to make money (by charging for apps), well indeed it is.....I can remember paying for plenty of apps for my Palms and Blackberry's (and I can remember there not being that many apps for the BB)........

~S
 
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tharmsen

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Jul 5, 2007
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#8
"the company is doing this because it simply doesn't understand smartphone users." - Hardy


So let me get this straight.

They (Apple) made a mistake because they do not understand "smart phone users." However, they consciously limited / restricted third party apps from the iPhone? Please. Don't try to make any publicly traded company look innocent.

Apple knew exactly what they were doing from the get-go.

Steve jobs owns you. Stop crying and mod the iPhone if you want the apps.

I find no human error in Apple's decision.
Another person that didn't read the article complete or didn't take it all in.

What's with the hostility anyway? No one is whining in here, we're merely discussing an article.
 

tharmsen

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Jul 5, 2007
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#9
Palm, RIM and Microsoft (Win mobile) have experienced their growing pains in this market and now it is Apple's turn. We shall see how they handle it....the solution proposed in the article is a pretty good compromise and for those that feel that it's just another way to make money (by charging for apps), well indeed it is.....I can remember paying for plenty of apps for my Palms and Blackberry's (and I can remember there not being that many apps for the BB)........

~S
I've heard very few people complain about having to pay for applications, but I've heard plenty of griping about paying Apple for applications. It seems, for some odd reason, that people hate Apple. I guess it goes with the territory though. Microsoft suffers the same love/hate relationship with their customers.
 

scandalex

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Sep 16, 2007
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#10
I do not think anybody is crying in this post. I have referred to Brighthand.com over the years and have found their reviews to be very fair and not biased to any one platform. As they are a site that deals specifically with palm and windows based smartphones, I thought it was a fresh perspective on the issue.

I do not think that the article is trying to make Apple appear innocent and I do not think that the writer is trying to say that Apple did not know what they were doing. My take on the article was that the writer felt that Apple has misjudged the targeted user base by not really understanding the exact market that the iPhone is competing in.....

As this is Apple's first foray into this market, mistakes are bound to be made. I have had pretty much every model Palm that was made and while I agree that there are virtually an endless amount of apps, there were not that many must have apps....

Palm, RIM and Microsoft (Win mobile) have experienced their growing pains in this market and now it is Apple's turn. We shall see how they handle it....the solution proposed in the article is a pretty good compromise and for those that feel that it's just another way to make money (by charging for apps), well indeed it is.....I can remember paying for plenty of apps for my Palms and Blackberry's (and I can remember there not being that many apps for the BB)........

~S
See, this is a large part of the problem or maybe its the mindset. Charging for apps is not unheard of; if anything, its expected. But there seems to be so many people that think FREE means everything- including any and all apps for the iPhone.

I am not going to be a hypocrite here; for my Treo(s) and 6700/6800, I have used *free* :p apps, yet there are quite a few I have paid for as well.

I would also imagine that since there is no SDK floating around for the iPhone, who better than Apple knows what will or wont brick your phone. If they keep the development of apps close and guarded, and you put on your iPhone an app that has Apples seal of approval and something happens to your iPhone....then by all means, you have earned the right to %^&* and moan; while also expecting something to be done about it.

If your 3rd party apps are coming from who knows where, many of you know you'd be the first to cry foul if an app damaged your iPhone and you WOULD be looking to Apple to replace it.
 
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Ezekiel2517

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Sep 20, 2007
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#11
I am glad that they are working on something like this and hopefully they will provide really usefull apps. I will definitely look into it if and when they come out with this. maybe these could even make jailbreaking your phone obsolete. who knows? :cool:
 

iPhone8801

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Sep 22, 2007
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#12
I do not think anybody is crying in this post. I have referred to Brighthand.com over the years and have found their reviews to be very fair and not biased to any one platform. As they are a site that deals specifically with palm and windows based smartphones, I thought it was a fresh perspective on the issue.

I do not think that the article is trying to make Apple appear innocent and I do not think that the writer is trying to say that Apple did not know what they were doing. My take on the article was that the writer felt that Apple has misjudged the targeted user base by not really understanding the exact market that the iPhone is competing in.....

As this is Apple's first foray into this market, mistakes are bound to be made. I have had pretty much every model Palm that was made and while I agree that there are virtually an endless amount of apps, there were not that many must have apps....

Palm, RIM and Microsoft (Win mobile) have experienced their growing pains in this market and now it is Apple's turn. We shall see how they handle it....the solution proposed in the article is a pretty good compromise and for those that feel that it's just another way to make money (by charging for apps), well indeed it is.....I can remember paying for plenty of apps for my Palms and Blackberry's (and I can remember there not being that many apps for the BB)........

~S
Sorry, I still don't believe Apple could misjudge their users. Who did Apple think the user base consisted of? Middle school kids? Seriously.


It was worth every pretty penny the company spent on engineering it (excluding the cheap glass they [Apple] used to cover the face). Also, is so obvious what the iPhone can and CANNOT do. But hopefully the new apps would be more useful as with anything I would like to see quality over quantity.

And I apologize for the rant earlier (toward the author). I did a quick run through of the article and like others said I did not take it in. However, upon reading your "take" on the article I still stand on the fact that he (the author) has no basis to claim that Apple made a mistake in judging the capability of the their phone.
 
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akophone

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Aug 1, 2007
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#13
I think it's a step closer to a compromise. We've come a long ways since June 29! Bring on the SDK, free or not. This will further enhance iPhone's functionality and popularity...
 

Waveguy

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Aug 18, 2007
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#14
Not a bad article.

But I disagree that Apple doesn't understand smartphone users. The point is, Apple doesn't think that the iPhone is a smartphone, at least not in the Blackberry-Treo sense of the word. Apple also doesn't think that the lack of native third-party apps is affecting iPhone sales to any great extent, and they may be right, for now. People on forums like this are hardly a random sample of iPhone users - we tend to be more demanding.

At some point, though, the tide will shift, especially as iPhone competitors that do offer apps appear. And I hope the author is right about Apple selling (or even giving away) "sanctioned" apps through iTunes.
 

tharmsen

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Jul 5, 2007
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#15
And I apologize for the rant earlier (toward the author). I did a quick run through of the article and like others said I did not take it in. However, upon reading your "take" on the article I still stand on the fact that he (the author) has no basis to claim that Apple made a mistake in judging the capability of the their phone.
You mean like that fact that Apple made no previsions for 3rd party apps, then at the 11th hour announced Web 2.0 support?

Yeah, there's no evidence of their misunderstanding the market place. LOL.