Has Apple Pulled a fast one on the OrangeMan?

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

dblaron

New Member
Bronze
Feb 17, 2007
58
0
0
#1
Lets see what everyone thinks about this one. That is for everyone who does not have cingular already. This is a direct quote which also gives sec. numbers from this site.

http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1170410587623.

So What this means is that because the phone is being sold in two locations. They can not stop you from unlocking the phones network. Cingular knows this and that is why they are trying to get everyone to sign a two year contract. It is the only way to keep people from going to a new carrier. So unless Apple is going to have you sign the contract in the Apple store you can also get this phone out right with no contract. But if you do not have a GSM network I do not think you should try this. Because this is a GSM phone. So remember do not sign any contract that you do not think you can get out of. Tell Me what you think? Good find or not?

THE CELLULAR PHONE INDUSTRY
Prior to this ruling, mobile service providers were using software locks to block user access to operating software and firmware embedded inside mobile phones. These locks prevented cellular users from switching existing phones from their current mobile carrier to a competitor's network. This was particularly problematic for users who traveled, because most mobile carriers only provide cellular service in certain geographical areas. Consequently, if a cell phone user wanted to switch from one carrier to another, the user oftentimes had to either (1) voilate the DMCA by circumventing the locking software to access the computer program that allows the phone to operate (mobile firmware) or (2) buy a new phone from the new carrier.
In at least one instance, a mobile service provider has enforced its rights under Section §1201(a)(1) of the DMCA by filing suit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. See TracFone Wireless, Inc. v. Sol Wireless Group, Inc., No. 05-23279-CIV (S.D. Fla., Feb. 28, 2006). In that suit, TracFone, a prepaid wireless company, alleged, among other things, that the defendants "avoided, bypassed, removed, disabled, deactivated, or impaired a technological measure for effectively controlling access to the proprietary software within the TracFone Prepaid Software without TracFone's authority." The case ultimately resulted in a permanent injunction in TracFone's favor.
Oddly enough, however, TracFone and most other major mobile service providers failed to provide their timely comments in response to the Librarian's public Notice of Inquiry. Only one opponent of the proposed exemption submitted timely comments. Meanwhile, numerous proponents of the exemption submitted timely comments which were entered into the record. The lack of attention on the part of the mobile service providers, however, should not be interpreted to mean that the exemption is of no consequence to the mobile phone industry. To the contrary, the results of the cell phone exemption on the industry and consumers will be significant.

RESULT OF CELL PHONE EXEMPTION
The result of this exemption is good news for cellular users. No longer will users be faced with an unpleasant choice of either (1) voilating the DMCA or (2) having to buy a new phone.
Now, users can legally unlock their cellular phones. Unlocking a cell phone allows a consumer to keep their current phone while changing service providers. Because cellular users can now easily switch from one carrier to another, there will be increased competition amongst service providers. Increased competition should cause prices for cellular service to stabilize or drop and also encourage providers to provide better service.

Timothy C. Meece is a partner and senior shareholder of Banner & Witcoff, and Aseet Patel is an associate at the firm. They are located at the firm's Chicago office and may be reached at tmeece@bannerwitcoff.com and apatel@bannerwitcoff.com. i>
Law.com's ongoing LEGAL MINDS article series highlights opinion and analysis from our site's contributors and writers across the ALM network of publications.
 

dino_russ

New Member
May 16, 2007
25
0
0
#3
It would be nice if true -- maybe I can use with Verizon earlier ? I may not understand the nuances of using with Verizon but it sure would be nice.

Russ
 
May 6, 2007
995
0
0
United States
#4
In theory, it could work if this does happen. However, there could certainly be the glitches and the possibility of bricking your new iPhone when "legally" unlocking it. We will have to wait and see, but I don't care much as I am already a Cingular customer.
 

iPhoneObsessed

New Member
Bronze
May 9, 2007
77
0
0
Hattiesburg, MS
www.myspace.com
#5
Lets see what everyone thinks about this one. That is for everyone who does not have cingular already. This is a direct quote which also gives sec. numbers from this site.

http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1170410587623.

So What this means is that because the phone is being sold in two locations. They can not stop you from unlocking the phones network. Cingular knows this and that is why they are trying to get everyone to sign a two year contract. It is the only way to keep people from going to a new carrier. So unless Apple is going to have you sign the contract in the Apple store you can also get this phone out right with no contract. But if you do not have a GSM network I do not think you should try this. Because this is a GSM phone. So remember do not sign any contract that you do not think you can get out of. Tell Me what you think? Good find or not?

I don't know much about the legal stuff, but I do know that you don't have to sign a contract to get the iPhone. You can just pay the retail price instead of a discounted price.
 

dino_russ

New Member
May 16, 2007
25
0
0
#7
It won't work on Verizon (or Sprint or Alltel...) as they are a CDMA network, not GSM.

Yep I found out from Chris on another thread after I had posted this. Well until ATT/Cingular has the coverage I need in distant rual areas that I find with Verizon I will just have to watch/listen to what you all find with with the iPhone and service. I have a year and half on my Verizon Treo 700 p contract so I know I am not going to be an early adopter anyway, but I hope to when there are other carriers 2 years from now (hopefully) if the iPhone does as well as I expect it to!

Russ
 

iPhoneObsessed

New Member
Bronze
May 9, 2007
77
0
0
Hattiesburg, MS
www.myspace.com
#10
Is the $499/$599 the retail prices or the discounted prices?

I wish I could remember the thread on here where I found that answer, or rumored answer. The thread has a picture of a 'future' cingular advertising poster, where I think it shows the price as being $399/$499 (someone correct me if I'm wrong) with a 2 year contract... So b/c of that, it's rumored that the $499/$599 is the retail price. Which I'm so happy about b/c I'm not out of contract yet and I have to pay the retail price. :)

Hopefully someone will reply with a link to that picture.. [hint,hint]
lol. :laugh2:
 

wot_fan

New Member
Silver
Mar 7, 2007
586
0
0
48
Chicagoland
web.mac.com
#11
If I remember correctly the source of that rumor was an online survey. Its purpose was to find out how many more people would purchase the iPhone if the price was less than the announced $499/$599. IMHO, there is no reason to believe that the decreased prices were anything more than a part of a hypothetical question.
 

netshadow

Member
Bronze
Apr 21, 2007
40
0
6
Upstate NY
#12
so sorry

It would be nice if true -- maybe I can use with Verizon earlier ? I may not understand the nuances of using with Verizon but it sure would be nice.

Russ
Unfortunately, Verizon's network is CDMA not GSM which the iPhone is! This means that the current configuration of the the iPhone network, locked or unlocked, will NOT WORK ON VERIZON in any way. I used to be with Verizon, but since I traveled overseas where CDMA is not workable, I changed to Cingular in order to have a GSM phone. As long as iPhone only is GSM and you are with Verizon, sorry-it will never work.