I activated my own 3G. Why'd I get charged the activation fee?

stevetim

New Member
Silver
Jul 20, 2007
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#1
LOL.

I remember on launch day when iTunes' servers went down. I tried to get my phone activated in the store, to no avail.

So, I had to take the phone home and connect to iTunes and activate it myself. It took a few tries, but after the hassle, it worked.

So my question is. Why on earth did they decide it was still OK to charge me an activation fee when I am the one that actually, well, activated it. I know the standard, it has to do with "network activation" and not actual physical process performed by someone in the store.

But still, you think they could at least waive the fee since I technically did their work for them?

This post is mostly in fun, it's only $18. But still, I think it's kind of a valid point.

Chime in.
 

dturner

Zealot
Gold
Dec 15, 2007
5,725
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Louisville, Ky.
#4
Isn't the $18 bucks an upgrade fee, as opposed to activation?
Yes, it is an upgrade fee not an activation fee.
This from the ATT website:
Is there an upgrade fee?
Yes. There is an $18 upgrade fee which will be billed to your account.

There is a $36 activation fee,but I believe it is usually just charged to new customers.
 

juzcallmeg0d

New Member
Bronze
Jun 13, 2008
189
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0
#5
LOL.

I remember on launch day when iTunes' servers went down. I tried to get my phone activated in the store, to no avail.

So, I had to take the phone home and connect to iTunes and activate it myself. It took a few tries, but after the hassle, it worked.

So my question is. Why on earth did they decide it was still OK to charge me an activation fee when I am the one that actually, well, activated it. I know the standard, it has to do with "network activation" and not actual physical process performed by someone in the store.

But still, you think they could at least waive the fee since I technically did their work for them?

This post is mostly in fun, it's only $18. But still, I think it's kind of a valid point.

Chime in.
you said it yourself, it has nothing to do with the physical activation of the phone. just like 3rd party dealers that activate AT&T and t-mobile and sprint phones...its not like the guy at the counter is charging you $36 to activate your phone, but you still have to pay it.
 

dcom

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Gold
Aug 7, 2007
1,421
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Suwanee, GA
#6
So my question is. Why on earth did they decide it was still OK to charge me an activation fee when I am the one that actually, well, activated it. I know the standard, it has to do with "network activation" and not actual physical process performed by someone in the store.

Chime in.
Because they can and they know you can't do anything about it.
 

gadgetgal

Member
Bronze
Jun 17, 2007
249
3
18
#8
Of course, with the V1, we all did the activation at home and still had to pay for it.
I would have preferred that option as well this time. Going home and syncing it to iTunes to set it up is the same amount of work anyway, not too different from activation. Most of us would have PREFERRED to be able to activate at home-no waiting around in stores!
But your point is raised that iTunes activation shouldn't have gone down on opening day; if this is how they've set up activation, then it should be fully up & running, especially on the launch day!
 

sonicwind

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May 12, 2008
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#9
I think this may be an actually good argument to get that fee waved. Combine that with the long wait lines due to all the activation problems and you've got an argument that a customer service rep can't really respond to. I'm not sure it's worth my time, but I'd say there's at least a 50/50 chance you can get a credit for the 36$ activation fee by arguing this on the phone to a CS.