I know it's been discussed before...

wesexcellence

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#1
But is it normal for the 3g to take the signal so far down?

Is there a technical reason why?

As soon as i turn my 3g off I go from barely 1 bar to full bars.

Just curious...
 

Saverino

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#2
Its because you don't have as much 3G coverage as you do EDGE...
 

AppleHead

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#3
3G is really touchy and depending on your location, you might not have a lot of coverage. But right now I have found the 3G network to not be that reliable. I would give it some time and it should be pretty good
 

aenti

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#6
Check ATT's coverage map, located on their website.
 

Panache010

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#8
AT&T knows 3G is spotty. Thats why the $10 increase over the next 2 yrs will pay for beefier towers on the network. Thats my 2 cents. :)
 

sonicwind

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#10
I've heard it said the 3G signal does not permeate common solid objects as easily as the Edge signal. This is just a function of the radio band that is being used (and the practice of having an internal antenna, rather than then having it stick out the top.) One thing I and others have noticed is that if you move your had away from the bottom back of the iPhone (like pinch it from the back corner at the top of the phone) you can often get better 3G reception (you will see the signal bars rise in a few seconds, and you will get faster internet access.)
 

AppleHead

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#11
Interesting, I have talked to an AT&T tower guy who says he lives right next to a 3G tower and still has bad reception. I just think 3G is buggy, I hope a new update will solve this issue
 

stevetim

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#12
3G is based on more than one tower connecting to your phone.

From what I read, the reason why we can get such high data rates is because we are downloading on more than one tower at a time.

Here is an excerpt I copied from mobilmastinfo.com. Credit them.

What is 3G?

The telecommunications world is continuing to change, and 3G technology represents the next stage in mobile communications. 3G is an evolution in terms of services and data speeds from second generation (2G) mobile networks.
There are now around 70 million mobile phones in use in the UK. Today's mobile customers have already demonstrated a demand for"non-voice" and other new services. On average, 99 million text messages are sent every day across the UK* . Proof of customer demand has also been indicated by the use of increased data services, such as instant e-mail and picture messaging, on 2G systems with GPRS (General Packet Radio Services).
3G broadband mobile communications makes access to sophisticated workplace technology inside your phone (3G handset compatibility required) even faster, making working life more flexible and developing still further the "virtual office" complete with emails, video conferencing and high speed access to services without the daily commute.
How does 3G work?

3G-enabled devices – including phones and laptops – work by sending and receiving radio signals to and from base stations (sometimes known as ‘masts’). Base stations link individual phones into the rest of the mobile and landline networks.
Base stations are low power radio transmitters and need to be located in the areas they are intended to serve. They provide coverage to a geographical area known as a cell. These cells need to overlap to enable seamless coverage and to ensure a user does not lose connection to the network when on the move.
Radio waves used in mobile telecommunications form part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Radio waves used to deliver 3G services are transmitted at a slightly higher frequency than for 2G and travel a shorter distance. As a result the coverage area or cell size for a 3G base station is smaller than for a 2G site. Furthermore, as user demand increases in a particular cell, the size of that cell shrinks making overlap even more essential.
Due to the advanced technology, the location of cell sites is even more critical with 3G networks to avoid interference between adjacent cells.
 

aenti

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#13
Interesting, I have talked to an AT&T tower guy who says he lives right next to a 3G tower and still has bad reception. I just think 3G is buggy, I hope a new update will solve this issue
An update wouldn't fix 3g. 3g is the ATT's network, not something that can be fixed by a firmware update. ATT did say they will be boosting their 3g signals across America, so the signal will get better.
 

AppleHead

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#14
An update wouldn't fix 3g. 3g is the ATT's network, not something that can be fixed by a firmware update. ATT did say they will be boosting their 3g signals across America, so the signal will get better.
I did not mean the phone, I meant AT&T updating their towers and possible network updates to the phone itself without literally plugging your iPhone into iTunes and updating