I need some general advice for MATH

How hard is Pre-Calculus

  • Extremely Hard!

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Pretty Challenging

    Votes: 3 27.3%
  • Ive always been good at math soo. . .

    Votes: 6 54.5%
  • I never took it

    Votes: 1 9.1%

  • Total voters
    11
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#1
I used to absolutely hate math! I mean I hated it so much that when ever I walked into a math class I would get this weird feeling in my something
-like whenever your driving and go over a random hill or slope:p

I will have officially started by Junior year of High School next tuesday and my starting math class this semester is Geometry. . .Now In the recent year or so I figured out what career I wanted and what I needed to get their... even spent most of last summer researching it and how to get their, and doing all the research the biggest most important thing you need is a good head for math and ever since then that has been my motivation to do well in school more particularly math:laugh2:
-I mean you should have seen my grades from my freshman year compared to my sophomore year Lol! You would have never thought I'd be taking school serious haha!

Well to make sure that I will always succeed in math Im gonna need some help and advice:sick: Although I passed Algebra I pt I and Algebra I pt II with 92's/94's I want to make sure that I get an A in math for the rest of my educational career if you understand what I mean. Cause eventhough I am motivating myself to be good at Math...motivation cant be enough soo. . .

Anyone have any advice they'd like to share relating to math:laugh2:
-I want to make math my favorite subject instead of elementary like little kid saying P.E was his favorite class Lol! To show how much this means to me heres my transcript/schedule for this year. . .Or atleast how it should look

1st semester
Geometry
Accounting
Economics
U.S History/ or I may take Law and Justice?

2nd semester
Algebra II
Physics
Economics
English III


My biggest hope or dream of HighSchool is to my senior year is to take the pre-calculus course and "pass", notice how I didn't give a specific letter grade:p
 
#2
PDS, I think you may find that different aspects of math present different challenges for you. Just as Geometry is totally different than Algebra, Calculus is totally different as well. My advice is to pay close attention in the very beginning with Calculus, and make sure you grasp the basics. Seek extra help if needed. Armed with a good basic foundation you should be able to handle it fine.
 

aenti

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Jul 8, 2008
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Maryland
#3
I was in a similar situation.
Last year I entered my Junior year with Pre-Calc GT as one of my courses.
I had not taken Alg II GT, so I was not prepared with the trig functions I needed to know.
A lot of Pre-Calc has to do with Trig. If you feel like you can handle the Unit Circle and more advanced sine, cosine, and tangent functions, by all means go for it PDS. I was more concerned about my GPA so I dropped down to Trig. My teacher for PC was extremely difficult. I went to her the first day and asked for trig material so that I can be ready to approach it when the time comes. She ignored me and proceeded to give us trig pop quizes EVERy day.

Now, keep in mind that Pre-Calc is rigorous. I had many friends who, although qualified, couldn't handle the course. You have your mind set, I see, so I think you will do fine. Good luck man! :)
 

Alexander

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Jun 28, 2007
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Atlanta
#4
PDS, does your school offer Advanced Trig? Because I recommend you take some trig before you tackle pre cal, or calculus for that matter. My friend living with me is a mathematics major, I'll talk to him for you when he gets home.
 

aenti

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Jul 8, 2008
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36
Maryland
#5
PDS, does your school offer Advanced Trig? Because I recommend you take some trig before you tackle pre cal, or calculus for that matter. My friend living with me is a mathematics major, I'll talk to him for you when he gets home.
Exactly. Trig=very important. You might be able to pull yourself along towards the end, but in the beginning you will struggle.
 
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#6
Sadly my school doesn't offer any trigonometry classes :( wait. . .
-I do remember that their is a class called "advanced math topics" that might cover alittle trigonometry but what most people do is skip this class- cause its an elective- and go straight to pre-calculus. . .

Of course Im not like "other" people so Im gonna take the class the first semester of my senior year, then go to pre-calc the second semester, then start the real calculus in college;)

When I go to college I plan to double major in Finance/ and Accounting OR Finance/ and Economics cause I'm still not sure whats would be more useful in New York:eek:
 

aenti

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Jul 8, 2008
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Maryland
#7
Dude, best of luck to you!
It's going to be hard, but I have no doubt you can pull it off. You seem very determined to get where you want to go, and that's the most important thing.
 
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#8
Thanks guys Im gonna need all the luck, motivation, and many many hours spent after school either with the teacher or at one of Sylvan learning centers:sick:
 
Aug 2, 2007
1,743
51
48
Long Island N.Y.
#9
Something you might really like pds, is Kevin Traudau's memory system, it's actually called mega memory, and mega memory advanced. You can get the tapes free at the public library. There fun, and after a few days of practice you will be able to remember hundreds of random objects, and in order, your friends will think you have a photographic memory. When you think about it, most of math is in recalling formulas, the tapes teach you to remember those formulas based on a memory peg system. Might be worth a look if ya have some spare time.
 
Aug 2, 2007
1,743
51
48
Long Island N.Y.
#11
Maybe a site like limewire or something similar might have a download of this, but if you have a library card, you can take em out and make copies of them. (shh, don't tell the FCC) lol
 

Youngbinks

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Jun 4, 2007
7,617
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Atlanta, Georgia
#13
Just be persistent with your studies and if you make yourself determined to learn the material and force yourself to maintain a healthy study habit with the class then you should be fine. Make sure that you ask questions ANYTIME you don't understand something. So many people never ask questions because they are afraid be being embarrassed and end up doing poorly in the class.

As far as difficulty of the class, that varies from person to person (obviously) but most people that are good at algebra are bad at geometry. Pre-Calc is entirely different however. (I know that didn't help at all)
 
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#14
Haha I understand what you mean;)
-Are you serious about some people that were good at algebra sucked at geometry:sick: Cause I know a girl( now a senior) who aced algebra struggled somewhat through geometry and passed pre-calculus with an B:eek:
 

acosmichippo

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Sep 10, 2007
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#15
I'm a computer science/mathematics major... but i do know where you're coming from. I feel the same way about english classes.


there's always somethin...
 
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#16
Yeah man I just don't want all my hard-work to have been a waste ya kno, cause my motivation is coming from future career of wanting to be an Investment Banker for Goldman Sachs or Merrill Lynch and If I don't get accepted by neither then I'd feel my whole life and hours of studying and work had been a waste :(
 

acosmichippo

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Sep 10, 2007
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DC
#17
out of curiosity, what attracts you to those professions?

If math really freaks you out, you'll get burnt-out before you make it out of college. I had to switch majors a couple times for similar reasons. Pick something you enjoy doing and plays to your strengths.
 

Youngbinks

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Jun 4, 2007
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Atlanta, Georgia
#18
As far as the geometry and algebra thing, everyone seems to believe this. I love math so I never had a problem but I had a lot of friends that did.

Also, going on what Hippo was saying, if you really hate math and force yourself to do it as a profession, you will likely burn out quickly. You will want to develop at least a liking for math prior to college that way you can at least enjoy what you're studying. What other subjects truly interest you?
 
Mar 30, 2008
5,126
0
0
Elizabethtown, Kentucky
#19
I don't hate math I just wanna be great at it, cause a year or two ago I realized from reading and common knowledge that without math your never gonna be much of or have much of anything in life of course this is my opinion but Ive done lots of research when I started thinking about college and the future, basically just planning ahead

My only back up plan is to take the "mcat" and hope to get accepted into med school. . .
 

kisstine

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Jul 12, 2007
1,332
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Northern California
#20
I don't hate math I just wanna be great at it, cause a year or two ago I realized from reading and common knowledge that without math your never gonna be much of or have much of anything in life of course this is my opinion but Ive done lots of research when I started thinking about college and the future, basically just planning ahead

My only back up plan is to take the "mcat" and hope to get accepted into med school. . .
Okay, um, first of all, what you "have in life" will not be a direct function of your ability to be successful in math (or any academic subject for that matter). The most valuable things you will bring to your family and to society at large will be far deeper and more meaningful than any class can teach or grade can measure. And as "haves" go, the material things will be far less important than the rest.

I teach at a k-12 school and my own two kids are both in high school, so I totally understand the pressure that is currently present in the structure of education in the US.

I am consistently impressed with what I see here, on EIC, with respect to young people with high goals and plans to achieve them. I applaud you for the mindful way you are approaching life. At the same time, I would encourage you to not feel bound by goals you set as a child. (I don't mean for that to sound offensive or demeaning in any way.) We change a lot as we experience new things and meet new people. Allow youself space for those changes because, more than likely, you'll have different ideas at 30 than you do at 18.

Unrelated to this bigger picture, financial math is quite different from the scientific math that is the focus of our teaching at the high school level. And while the general problem-solving skills will support you in the future, you're not going to use calculus in a career in finance.