I think I ruined my battery...

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tfg

New Member
Jun 20, 2007
213
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0
#1
Well I've been fairly happy with the battery life on the iPhone, but think that I ruined the battery the other day. I normally get 2-3 days of standby time and up to anywhere between 6 and 8 hours usage time. I typically only need to charge every 3 days or so.

Well on Sunday the phone completely drained and read "please plug into power source". It was partly my fault because I got the 20% remaining message and ignored it. The next thing I knew, the phone was dead.

So now, I'm getting half the usage time and I'm noticing that the battery is showing 1/8 used and that's only with 30 minutes of usage! I haven't even used internet or made a call, i've only sent a few text messages.

So this is a message to everyone, (which I'm sure that everyone is aware of, but nevertheless is worth repeating), do not let your battery drain that low. When you get the 20% battery remaining, you should plug it in. Don't risk it or you'll be left with less capacity like mine.
 

fright88

New Member
Bronze
Sep 17, 2007
34
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0
#7
Is the batter in the iPhone different from most other rechargable batteries? I have always been told to use the battery until it is dead and completely recharge for best battery life.
 

g33k1

New Member
Bronze
Sep 6, 2007
61
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San Antonio Tx
#8
Is the batter in the iPhone different from most other rechargable batteries? I have always been told to use the battery until it is dead and completely recharge for best battery life.
Yeah I have always heard that its good to drain the battery all the way every once in a while
 

tfg

New Member
Jun 20, 2007
213
0
0
#10
I was under that same impression as well, but something definitely happened when it completely drained the other day. It's way too coincedental that the faster battery drain is related to just normal usage or battery wear with it having started the day after that complete drain.

I'm down 1/4 battery with only 1 hour of usage. That's ridiculous. Is there any kind of warranty? I've actually never read the Apple warranty.
 

adseguy

New Member
Bronze
Jul 1, 2007
401
0
0
#11
A program may be stuck....this happens. Is the phone a little hot? either way do a restart and continue from there.
 

Prelector

Member
Bronze
Sep 6, 2007
151
1
18
#12
No its not different you are correct in draining it to almost zero once in a while every time
Actually, this is NOT correct.

Nickel Cadmium batteries needed to be fully discharged to minimum battery "learning" and reduction of total charge capacity.

Lithium Ion batteries (the kind in the iPhone and most new electronics) are just the opposite. You should charge them whenever it's convenient, and NEVER fully discharge them.

Now, this is a bit of a misnomer however. Technically, it should be impossible to "Fully" discharge a consumer Li-ion battery, as there is a smart circuit implanted to prevent this exact thing from happening. It's possible however that this smart circuit has failed in some way. When a Li-ion battery is "Fully" discharged, it will irrepairably damage the battery, and cause it to fall into a "Deep Discharge" state. At this point, the battery is done.

So, while it should be fine to run the battery to empty (since the internal circuit actually cuts off the power before it's completely discharged and damaged), it's best not to tempt fate. At 20%, I'd start looking for a charging solution if possible... at 10%, I'd immediately try and find a charging solution. If nothing is available, shut the device down to be safe.
 

adseguy

New Member
Bronze
Jul 1, 2007
401
0
0
#13
Not to sound arrogant, but I know about all that. So the straight answer is still correct. You need to tell the iPhone where the battery stands at it's "near" zero percent so it can fully charge. If the fail safe failed, then it was doomed to begin with.:(
 

AngelJO008

New Member
Bronze
Jun 20, 2007
140
0
0
#14
Well I've been fairly happy with the battery life on the iPhone, but think that I ruined the battery the other day. I normally get 2-3 days of standby time and up to anywhere between 6 and 8 hours usage time. I typically only need to charge every 3 days or so.

Well on Sunday the phone completely drained and read "please plug into power source". It was partly my fault because I got the 20% remaining message and ignored it. The next thing I knew, the phone was dead.

So now, I'm getting half the usage time and I'm noticing that the battery is showing 1/8 used and that's only with 30 minutes of usage! I haven't even used internet or made a call, i've only sent a few text messages.

So this is a message to everyone, (which I'm sure that everyone is aware of, but nevertheless is worth repeating), do not let your battery drain that low. When you get the 20% battery remaining, you should plug it in. Don't risk it or you'll be left with less capacity like mine.
restore the software--Mine did the same thing and I tried everything...did a restore and it's back to normal--back it up first so that all of your info will be put back on it after the restore (this is of course assuming you have not modded your phone :) ) It happened right after one of the upgrades and I guess the phone was stuck in a cycle of thinking it was doing something when in fact it wasn't. Did the restore like I said and it is better than ever.
 

Prelector

Member
Bronze
Sep 6, 2007
151
1
18
#15
Not to sound arrogant, but I know about all that. So the straight answer is still correct. You need to tell the iPhone where the battery stands at it's "near" zero percent so it can fully charge. If the fail safe failed, then it was doomed to begin with.:(
No, it's not correct.

You don't need to fully discharge the battery to "tell the iPhone" anything. The iPhone display is reading the smart circuit imbedded in the battery itself. This circuit monitors the voltage level of the actual battery, and uses this voltage level to calculate how much "juice" is in it. This is all set at time of manufacture.

The iPhone itself provides current to the battery for charging when it's receiving current from an outside source. The smart circuit itself either blocks or allows the current to flow to the battery material, adding to the charge.

As to the battery being "doomed to begin with", this isn't entirely accurate either. Technically, if you never discharged the battery below a safe point, let's call this 20% remaining, then the smart circuit wouldn't have come into play anyways. The "Deep Discharge" state only occurs when the battery voltage drops below it's sustainable minimum point (usually 2.5v-3v). Due to the nature of the materials used, below this point the battery is actually burning voltage faster than it can be added, leading to battery "death". The smart circuit is designed to cut off the battery before it drops this low. If the circuit fails, but you never drop this low on your own, then you've achieved the same result... happy battery.

Is the iPhone battery the same as "other batteries"? It's the same as any other Li-ion battery, yes. However, the original rechargeable batteries were ni-cad, and operated in a completely different way. Most people think that all rechargeables are the same, and don't realize (or aren't told) that modern li-ion batteries don't follow the same rules.

Basically, when you're not using it, slap it in the charger if it's convenient. If it's not convenient, no big deal... but try not to "push" things to 0% if you don't have to. You should be fine if you do, but no sense in pushing that envelope if you don't have to.
 

adseguy

New Member
Bronze
Jul 1, 2007
401
0
0
#16
Oh ok, Thanks! I thought the iPhone had the controller on it not the battery. Thanks for clearing that up. i just seems strange because one time I noticed my phoen was a little hot when I took it off the dock every morning for a couple days. I decided to drain the battery. The morning after I did that the phone was cool again....that's how I assumed. Any rhyme or reason to that?
 

AngelJO008

New Member
Bronze
Jun 20, 2007
140
0
0
#17
A program may be stuck....this happens. Is the phone a little hot? either way do a restart and continue from there.
A restart doesn't always take care of it (at least in my case it didn't) Always good to start there first. However, if that doesn't do it, do a restore.
 

Prelector

Member
Bronze
Sep 6, 2007
151
1
18
#18
Oh ok, Thanks! I thought the iPhone had the controller on it not the battery. Thanks for clearing that up. i just seems strange because one time I noticed my phoen was a little hot when I took it off the dock every morning for a couple days. I decided to drain the battery. The morning after I did that the phone was cool again....that's how I assumed. Any rhyme or reason to that?
I noticed my iPhone was HOT also, after the first 1 or 2 charges after buying it (this was on the NEW phone only, didn't happen on my replacement unit). If I let it go though, after that it's been fine, never had a problem...

If I had to guess, I'd say you're feeling a buildup of heat from an initial charge. I'd guess you could also feel this if you left the iPhone sit on a shelf for a month or so, and then tried to use it...

Other than the iPhone, I'd never heard of the battery charging heat problem before (at least not with any consistancy), so not sure if it's something unique to the iPhone battery (doubt that) or more likely, the casing is just so thin, that we're better able to feel it.
 

tfg

New Member
Jun 20, 2007
213
0
0
#19
I just did a reset (holding the home button and the sleep button for 8 seconds), not a restore, and it looks like it may have worked. The meter hasn't gone down much in the last 24 hours since I did it. The true test will be when I give it a full charge again. I'll try that tonight.