iPhone and cold weather limits

PapaST

Member
Bronze
Sep 10, 2007
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#1
I plan to go hiking in some cold weather. I know that some electronics like cameras and batteries have issues with colder weather. Is anyone aware of cold weather limits for the iPhone?
 

jclake

New Member
Dec 4, 2008
9
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#2
Cold weather

I have noticed that the touch screen doesn't work very well if it is less then 20 degrees. I think it is happens when your fingers are very cold. You must tap many, many times.
 

PapaST

Member
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Sep 10, 2007
458
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#3
I never thought about that. I was figuring the battery life would be terrible or something else. Good info... thanks.
 

josmi

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Jan 6, 2009
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#4
yeah, the touch screen is heat sensitive.
so cold fingers = touch screen no workie.
 

meems

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Dec 3, 2008
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#5
on the iPhone spec page it says this

Environmental requirements


  • Operating temperature: 32° to 95° F
    (0° to 35° C)
  • Nonoperating temperature: -4° to 113° F
    (-20° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
  • Maximum operating altitude: 10,000 feet (3000 m)
 

iconone

Zealot
Gold
Apr 8, 2008
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Clear Lake Texas
#7
on the iPhone spec page it says this

Environmental requirements



  • Operating temperature: 32° to 95° F
    (0° to 35° C)
  • Nonoperating temperature: -4° to 113° F
    (-20° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
  • Maximum operating altitude: 10,000 feet (3000 m)
I live in houston texas and in the summer it gets 100+ with 100% humidity is that bad for my phone?
 

Elbacanazo920

New Member
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Dec 23, 2007
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Bronx, NY
#8
I live in houston texas and in the summer it gets 100+ with 100% humidity is that bad for my phone?
According to the Chart it shouldn't. But hey if it still works, That's great. I'm living through this Horrible NYC weather so this phone could really take some frigid temperature. Now we need someone in Alaska to confirm This. ( Is there a Palin in the Crowd?)
 

geordisjd

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Jul 1, 2007
2,442
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#9
[*]Maximum operating altitude: 10,000 feet (3000 m)

I know for a fact that my iPhone 3G works at 13,000 feet. I was hiking in the Colorado mountains (going uphill in this case), when after a "no service" zone, my Phone suddenly came to life and I started getting emails and phone calls (line of sight, I guess).


I guess the environmental requirements are not absolute, probably just optimal.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

iPhoneMonster

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Jan 18, 2009
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#10
I was ok a flight and we were at around 38,000 feet (HK - SFO, btw for all you americans out there, America is awsome! The west coast atleast I haven't been to the east yet. It's different to Australia) and my iPhone was working fine with airplane mode on.
 

geordisjd

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Jul 1, 2007
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#11
I was ok a flight and we were at around 38,000 feet (HK - SFO, btw for all you americans out there, America is awsome! The west coast atleast I haven't been to the east yet. It's different to Australia) and my iPhone was working fine with airplane mode on.
That's because your iPhone didn't know it was at 38,000 feet! Commercial aircrafts are pressurized at 5,000 feet, lower than Denver, Co.
 

acosmichippo

Genius
Platinum
Sep 10, 2007
15,385
1,089
113
DC
#13
Apple releases those normal operating conditions so that if someone is in an environment the iPhone was not designed to handle and they have problems with the iPhone, Apple support has the ability to say "sorry, it was not designed for this use, so we can't help you".

in other words, they're not trying to tell us it won't work outside of those conditions, but they can't guarantee it will.
 

piyf420

New Member
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Jun 19, 2008
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#15
I was ok a flight and we were at around 38,000 feet (HK - SFO, btw for all you americans out there, America is awsome! The west coast atleast I haven't been to the east yet. It's different to Australia) and my iPhone was working fine with airplane mode on.

Thanks for the laugh.
 

icecreamman2

New Member
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Jul 23, 2008
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san francisco/vancouver
#17
i was up skiing on whistler mountain in canada and with wind chill it got to i -37 degrees celsius and my phone was in a regular pocket and it worked well and the battery lasted just as long as it usually does.
 
Jul 15, 2008
16
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0
#18
the touch screen is not heat sensitive. it is static sensitive, using what little electrons in your body to signal the iPhone. very smart if you ask me. So theoretically it should work better in the cold. I live in Canada my self and winter temperatures here go below -20c. about -5 Fahrenheit and my iPhone 3g works fine.

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/iPhone1.htm

 

jdinner

New Member
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Dec 14, 2008
47
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#19
I was snowboarding last week with the phone in a hard case at -20C > -35C with the windchill.
It worked fine, listened to music and answered calls while snowboarding.
It did fog up on the exterior only when I went indoors.
 
Jul 19, 2008
3,585
40
48
London or Miami
#20
Yup the Screen, is Electron responsive. As long as your body's static, or electrons can make contact with the surface or pass through a barrier you can still use the phone. Example, Take a square of tissue/kleenex/toilet tissue...its so thin you can still use the phone. Some fabrics do the same...however once the barrier becomes to thick, the electrons cant pass or the static cant reach the screen then u cant operate it.

Not heat sensitive, its not touch sensitive....its just simple electron conductivity...which is why a regular stylus dosent work.

As for operating tempurates....well i put mine in a watertight box, and swam to the bottom of the swimming pool (9ft). I managed to open the phone icon before i ran outa breath.