iPhone Dev Community to Steve Jobs: We need to talk.

Jul 8, 2007
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#1
We may be able to get past 1.1.1, we may be able to get past 1.2.1, but if we don't get Apple on our side, we will never get past being the minority, If we don't act now, we will not have a chance later. If we can start some kind of a movement to show them that it's in their best interest to not shut us out, we can get them on our side.

http://hackint0sh.org/forum/showthread.php?t=7933
 

geordisjd

Zealot
Bronze
Jul 1, 2007
2,442
12
38
#2
We may be able to get past 1.1.1, we may be able to get past 1.2.1, but if we don't get Apple on our side, we will never get past being the minority, If we don't act now, we will not have a chance later. If we can start some kind of a movement to show them that it's in their best interest to not shut us out, we can get them on our side.

http://hackint0sh.org/forum/showthread.php?t=7933
I think it's bull. Apple has the motivation to improve. It always had it in the past and will continue to do so. The iPhone is a first of a kind and came out less than 3 months ago. Apple has been working on it for years and it's too early to expect major changes. The changes will come, but not because a few teenagers or 20-somethings who love hacking scare it with empty threats. And it might not be the changes that you want, but then, you can invest your time and money somewhere else. You can't push it to evolve any faster just because you want to.
 

x999x

New Member
Gold
Aug 6, 2007
1,656
0
0
#3
If you have followed the homebrew/hacking scene on other platforms outside the Apple spectrum, you'd see a trend in how the parent company responds. It either doesn't admit the scene exists, or it tries to stop it every month, like Sony and the PSP for example.

Conversely, Apple and Steve Jobs have already admitted that native 3rd party applications do in fact exist, and are thus far taking a neutral stance to the scene. On top of this there has also been interest in one or more applications which have been developed by homebrew coders.

We don't need a bigger sandbox for every coder who thinks we need accelerometers to change our calendar pages.