iPhone Hackers Prosecuted

Redfor

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Jul 31, 2007
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#21
I think where it became illegal is when the kid made a profit from it ( The Car, and being payed to teach other people in the this guys company how to hack it). It's not Illegal to hack it, but it is illegal to make a profit from the hack. From what I understand. But I could deffinately wrong on this since Im no lawyer.
 

The Apple

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#22
Apple has no standing against the kid. If I choose to open up my phone and change it, then cancel my AT&T service and go with another carrier, how the f can Apple prevent me from this? It's anorher thing if I sell the Apple code and debatable if I start selling the unlocking service (note that the kid is NOT selling the service). But for modifying your own PURCHASED device to use it any which way you like, they have no standing. Heck you can buy a bmw and mod the heck out of it and stop taking it to bmw for service but take it to Joe Schmoe service station, who are they to tell you not to do that with YOUR property that you paid dearly for?
when you purchased and activated your phone, you agreed to terms and conditions set forth by Apple & AT&T. You may not have read it, but upon activation, you agreed to these conditions. I don't like being bound by these terms either, but you don't have a choice if you want the phone. That is how they can legally keep you from modifying your phone. I do mod my phone, but i have not cracked the software with the intent of using a carrier other than the one Apple contracted me with. I do understand your frustrations though.
 

Tinman

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#23
when you purchased and activated your phone, you agreed to terms and conditions set forth by Apple & AT&T. You may not have read it, but upon activation, you agreed to these conditions.
Those kinds of "agreements" are frowned upon by the courts, unenforceable in many instances, and mainly used to scare and intimidate the weak-minded. You are not weak-minded enough to fall for it, are you? :p

Also, AFAIK the kid never signed up with AT&T anyway. So what "activation" are you talking about?


And the analogy to satellite receivers is off the mark. The iPhone unlock methods discussed here do not allow an iPhone to receive free cell service. That is the only way that could be even remotely equivalent to satellite hacks, whose entire purpose is to allow free programming.


--
Mike
 

The Apple

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#24
Those kinds of "agreements" are frowned upon by the courts, unenforceable in many instances, and mainly used to scare and intimidate the weak-minded. You are not weak-minded enough to fall for it, are you? :p

Also, AFAIK the kid never signed up with AT&T anyway. So what "activation" are you talking about?


And the analogy to satellite receivers is off the mark. The iPhone unlock methods discussed here do not allow an iPhone to receive free cell service. That is the only way that could be even remotely equivalent to satellite hacks, whose entire purpose is to allow free programming.



--
Mike
It looks like I got sidetracked or something. When I posted about the satellite card it was going to lead to a point that Apple would most likely fix the programing to keep shutting down the unlock methods. Kind of similar to the satellite cards code always getting changed to thwart "my buddy".
 
Jun 29, 2007
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#25
It looks like I got sidetracked or something. When I posted about the satellite card it was going to lead to a point that Apple would most likely fix the programing to keep shutting down the unlock methods. Kind of similar to the satellite cards code always getting changed to thwart "my buddy".
You might have yet again sidetracked, hacking satellite and phones are very different in many ways. Think "SOLUTIONS".

To the OP, look-up PROSECUTED in the dictionary or simply use your widget.
 

ATT*Mark

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#26
lets see if they can unlock the jail cell....
 

Silverado

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#27
lets see if they can unlock the jail cell....
Jail cell?! :rolleyes:

That's it... I give up. Reason has no place here.

I did not know Apple was a religion, but it is obvious now.
 

ATT*Mark

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#28
don't cry. I could honestly care less if somebody wants to unlock their iPhone and use a shitty carrier like Trash mobile. But by buying the iPhone it doesn't matter if you activate it or not. if there is a clause stating that modifying hardware or software of the phone is punishable by law, then there is nothing they can do......
 

Tinman

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#29
don't cry. I could honestly care less if somebody wants to unlock their iPhone and use a shitty carrier like Trash mobile. But by buying the iPhone it doesn't matter if you activate it or not. if there is a clause stating that modifying hardware or software of the phone is punishable by law, then there is nothing they can do......
"Punishable by law?" Where do people come up with this nonsense? No wonder we are doomed...



--
Mike
 

ATT*Mark

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#31
i said "if" lets go ahead and read a little bit better next time.
 

Silverado

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#32
"Punishable by law?" Where do people come up with this nonsense? No wonder we are doomed...



--
Mike
Don't argue! Even if the contract doesn't state this or is uninforceable, by Steve they deserve an even worse fate for daring to veer from the path that (we think) pleases Him.
 

iPastor

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#33
You might have yet again sidetracked, hacking satellite and phones are very different in many ways. Think "SOLUTIONS".

To the OP, look-up PROSECUTED in the dictionary or simply use your widget.
I meant to put a ? at the end of the thread title. Sorry for the confusion.
 

iCop

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#35
The first link posted in this thread crashes my safari on my iPhone everytime. Odd.
 

dovebar27

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Jul 28, 2007
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#36
It's a losing battle on the AT&T/Apple side. I've never seen a GSM phone that cannot be unlocked. It's not like they didn't try to make it hard; the iPhone has been VERY hard to unlock and that is why it took so long. There are now at least three different ways to use another carrier's sim card. Changing the phone to thwart all of them and keeping up with new ones takes a lot of work that requires changing fundamental software/firmware in the device, which is not to be done lightly or quickly.
Hiya,

Gee...you've never seen a GSM phone that cannot be unlocked? Try the Sidekick. Back when I had a Sidekick II, it was said in various Sidekick/HipTop forums that it's possible to SIM unlock it, but T-Mobile would never give out the unlock codes. After attempting to ask T-Mobile's customer service and phone repair/unlocking places in town and getting nowhere that way, I just shrugged to myself and got myself the Blackberry Pearl eventually because it can be SIM unlocked. (And it doesn't look like an unstylish brick when you hold it up to your ear, as the Sidekicks do. Ugh....) Good thing I bought the Pearl, too...I was able to take it to the Philippines earlier this summer and use it out there. I wasn't able to bring my laptop with me, but I had my Pearl, and it was enough. I was able to keep in touch with my friends and family here in the States via email using T-Mobile's international email deal for Blackberries and all in all, I added about $7 to my normal bill because I only got charged for the time I used it (about three weeks?). Not bad.

Anyway...the idea of having a phone that cannot be unlocked, even now with laws in place that apparently guarantee us the right to get unlock codes for phones, really isn't new. If T-Mobile and the HipTop/Sidekick folks have gotten away with it all this time, then Apple+AT&T can get away with it too. And yeah, it rots, but you either take the deal as is or you walk away from the phone and find one that can be unlocked without any kind of legal threat from a carrier.
 

Tinman

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#37
Hiya,

Gee...you've never seen a GSM phone that cannot be unlocked? Try the Sidekick. Back when I had a Sidekick II, it was said in various Sidekick/HipTop forums that it's possible to SIM unlock it, but T-Mobile would never give out the unlock codes.
Just because T-Mobile didn't unlock it doesn't mean it cannot be unlocked.

I know/knew of at least 3 people with unlocked Sidekick IIs. And this guy seems to have satisfied customers, including those buying the $10.50 Sidekick II unlock software:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Unlocking-Softw...1986310QQihZ020QQcategoryZ64355QQcmdZViewItem


--
Mike
 
Jun 29, 2007
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#38
don't cry. I could honestly care less if somebody wants to unlock their iPhone and use a shitty carrier like Trash mobile. But by buying the iPhone it doesn't matter if you activate it or not. if there is a clause stating that modifying hardware or software of the phone is punishable by law, then there is nothing they can do......
It's only there for warranty issues, just like any other product serviceable. It voids the warranties but is not punishable by law. It's yours when you bought it and can use and do anything to it anyway you want. It's that simple. It's a different story if you profit, i.e. from unlocking codes.
 

The Apple

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#40
I don't understand why people think contracts are not upholdable in courts. If you have a contract with a landlord that says you have to pay the rent, and you don't pay the rent, your landlord will win a case against you in a court. If you have a contract with a car rental company and you never return their car, if they pursue you, they will win their case. If you agree to an agreement, that means that you agree......even if you never read the contract. If you press the "I accept" or the "I agree" button that is the same as signing your name to a contract. It states that in the agreements most people do not read, and just click the button to move on. I mean if you read through the agreements for most anything online, it actually states that. So why would it not be upholdable in court if someone was pursued? Just asking.