iPhone heading down the razr's path. . .

Mar 30, 2008
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#1
The reason that Motorola’s legendary Razr eventually crashed and burned was that the company and its carrier clients have quickly discounted the device. By 2006, Americans could get the Razr for free, and it soon became the most widely held phone in the country. Very soon after that, no one wanted to own the Razr, the phone that everyone else had. Could the iPhone be heading down the same path? Possibly: AT&T and international carriers have begun to lower the iPhone’s price. Some carriers in Europe already offer the phone to their subscribers for free. AT&T has made the new iPhone available for $199 with a two-year contract. Demand for the device is sure to spike as a result. But Apple needs to make sure it doesn’t spike too much — that the iPhone doesn’t turn from a status symbol into the next Razr, and fast.
-Courtesy of businesssweek:)

Discuss
 
H

Hayesimus

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#2
Well, don't hate me, but I hope it does! The RAZR becoming oversaturated in the market only helped pave the way for better phones. Because then people will want something better. Behold iPhone. Now if iPhone becomes the RAZR, image what would steal its thunder... But you also need to consider that the crash and burn was only partly because of its widespread appearances. I think the worst thing about the RAZR was its TERRIBLE quality. I don't know of anyone on the planet that has a decent looking RAZR that is the original one they bough. Most everyone I've ever asked has said they are on their 4th or 5th one. That's horrible quality. The iPhone at least seems to be doing better in that area. :p
 

aggieman

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Jul 6, 2007
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#3
I just don't see this happening at all. The demise of the RAZR was that once everybody and their dog and their dog's puppies got ahold of one they realized that although it looked cool, it sucked ass! The iPhone is a great piece of technology and while it has a long way to go in some areas (camera, mms, file access) it is still a one of a kind. Look at all the copy cats that have popped up. None of them have been able to replicate the experience of the iPhone. I bought my fiance a Samsung Glyde the other day b/c she is on verizon. That screen is a POS. It's almost like you have to pound it to get it to recognize it has been touched. I hate the notion that it is not a cool phone anymore because everyone will have one. Come on, everyone has an iPod. The iPod still sells. It always will until the iPhone is available on every carrier then people will just get an iPhone. The Nokia N95 in Europe is free in some places and 99-199 in a lot of places. It still is a kick ass phone that sells like crazy in most places in Europe. And it sells pretty well here even with the miniscule amount of market Nokia throws out.

As long as the name Apple is in front of the word iPhone, it will sell. Steve Jobs could take a dump, wrap it in foil and sit it on shelves in the Apple stores and it would sell because the Apple fans think anything that comes from Apple is the best thing out there. I like Apple but I'm not that extreme, hence the reason I got an N95.

And if anyone buys the iPhone thinking it is a status symbol and makes them cool, they have serious issues and need to seek mental help immediately. It's a damn electronic device. it doesn't change your personality, looks, male pattern baldness, weight, lack of intelligence, and all around dorky behavior.
 

Marianne

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Jul 16, 2007
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#4
wow. remind me not to buy businesss week magazine anymore - what poor thinking/logic on their part.

the iPhone has a fantastic user interface and is multi-functioned (in a user-friendly manner), unlike the razr, which has a major impact on the iPhone's appeal and usefulness to people. i think people are more likely to be interested in buying and keeping the iPhone, whereas most people bought a razr based on its looks and size alone. also, assuming that no one will want the iPhone in the future because it will be more common as the price decreases assumes that most people select their cell phones based on the fact that others around them don't have the same cell phone, and i don't think that's true. prices of computers have gone down over time, and you don't see people buying less of them because more of their friends have them. luxury car makers are producing smaller and less expensive models in order to attract a wider range of buyers, and their sales have gone up, not down.
 

Hawk

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#5
Well, I think that the Razor's novelty was that it was so thin, with a thin keypad. There wasn't much more to it than that. They keep releasing newer versions as soon as they can incorporate the latest tech into them, but in many ways, they are simply playing catchup to the other makers.
The iPhone itself is pretty revolutionary, and as long as Apple can stay ahead of the copy-cats, there won't be a huge decline until the next level of tech comes out. I'm talking Flexible touch OLED. That tech is still years away from being a reality though.
Apple needs to step up what the current ( both released and coming in July) phones have.
Things like A2DP support, businesss card and file sharing on Bluetooth would keep them CURRENT. They need to step above that. The next gen should have the ability to do things like interact with a Car's BT system to unlock and even start a car. the WiFi needs to be B,G, and N. The memory should be 32 GIGs and there should be a file explorer as an app. Video conferencing should also be standard - with a camera that can actually work in low light situations, since more times than not, that is where people seem to be situated when they want to use the camera.
Thinner would also be nice, and maybe a faster processor/ram interface.
Things like this would always keep the iPhone on the top of the pile. But remember, there are still companies like Nokia that are still working on their version of the touchscreen phone, and with the ability to see what the current phones out there have and need, they will have a definite leg up when they are finally ready to release theirs.


Of course, that's just my opinion...
 

ColsTiger

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Mar 8, 2007
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#6
I also think the mass manufacturing of the RAZR led to it's demise. The earlier RAZRs seemed to be much higher quality than the later models.
 

connie

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Jul 11, 2007
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#7
I bought the razr when the pink ones came out and I loved it, I never had a single problem with it. Now people talk about it like it was a joke. I don't know if the iPhone will get like this but for the here and now it remains an amazing phone.
 

psylichon

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#8
Comparing these two phones at any level is like comparing oranges to hand grenades. What a pointless article...
 

Eragon

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#10
Up10ad hit the nail on the head. The Razr was the Model T for cell phones. When it came out, it combined form factor with the then-state of the art features. What killed the Razr, and then Motorola itself, was the fact that the technology was allowed to stagnate. Motorola failed to recognize the need for cell phones to keep up with what customers were wanting. Though still a good price, people were moving away from the Razr to other products.

We are seeing the same trend with WM devices. WM OS has not kept up with what customers expect today. One only has to go to Mobility Today and read up on the new HTC Touch Pro reviews.

The iPhone V1 was state of the art, and scratched our technology itches. Customers are craving for features and functionality that Apple is turning its back towards with the release of iPhone 3G.

After all, it only takes one Oh s..t to wipe out a thousand Attaboys (or girls :) ) For proof, ask Motorola.
 

Lincoln

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#11
The iPhone is made by Apple... I don't see it crashing and burning any time soon. I think we all know that iPhone > Razr.

- John
 

|3are

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Jun 13, 2008
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#12
I got a Razr in 2006 for free o.O

The iPhone isn't free. Far from it. In fact, it will cost MORE to own and operate the iPhone 3G than it cost many people to own and operate their iPhone v1. It won't lose its exclusivity this time around, or maybe for several more years.

I also agree with other people who have said that the Razr didn't really have a whole lot going for it. The screen isn't that big, the camera isn't that great. The only thing it had going for it was how it looked. That definitely wore off once many people started getting it. Even if lots of people get the iPhone 3G, I'll still love mine (I'm sure) and still want to have the internet in my pocket.
 

Staszek

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Sep 24, 2007
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#14
Up10ad hit the nail on the head. The Razr was the Model T for cell phones. When it came out, it combined form factor with the then-state of the art features. What killed the Razr, and then Motorola itself, was the fact that the technology was allowed to stagnate. Motorola failed to recognize the need for cell phones to keep up with what customers were wanting. Though still a good price, people were moving away from the Razr to other products.

We are seeing the same trend with WM devices. WM OS has not kept up with what customers expect today. One only has to go to Mobility Today and read up on the new HTC Touch Pro reviews.

The iPhone V1 was state of the art, and scratched our technology itches. Customers are craving for features and functionality that Apple is turning its back towards with the release of iPhone 3G.

After all, it only takes one Oh s..t to wipe out a thousand Attaboys (or girls :) ) For proof, ask Motorola.
I agree I had a razr it actually wasn't a bad phone at the time, I had no problems with mine, but technologically it just stayed the same. Motorola basically just came out with new colors for the last 5+ years.

You can have it in a million colors you need to advance the product.

It really sucks for Moto to because they used to be an innovator, I remember when I had a Startac it was so amazing at the time.

I also agree about the Windows Mobile OS, its awful. My friend has a blackjack II, not a bad little phone but the OS is soooooo unintuitive.

Anyway any product can go that way if the maker doesn't continue to invest in R&D and change. If 3 years from now the iPhone is the same as it is today just in different colors it will go the way of the razr eventually, but I don't think Apple will let that happen. At least I hope not.
 

kneshoba

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Jun 25, 2007
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#15
Do you remember the prices of the razr, with no commitment, especially when the black one hit ebay. It was crazy and people where paying the money for one, and people fuss about a $399 iPhone. Motorola in my opinion stopped and kept the look and same software added some updates which led to a dead end for them. Mobile Technology is changing so rapidly and the iPhone V1 and V2 are expandable to the ever changing mobile world.
 

JoeT

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Dec 18, 2007
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#16
Well, I think that the Razor's novelty was that it was so thin, with a thin keypad. There wasn't much more to it than that.
I agree. Once the novelty wore off, it was just another phone. The iPhone actually has really useful and unique features; it is a completely different circumstance. Being ubiquitous hasn't hurt the iPod much.


The next gen should have the ability to do things like interact with a Car's BT system to unlock and even start a car.

You'd need to come up with one hell of a security methodology before I would *ever* permit this on my vehicle. BT is pretty darn insecure. Further, most of the work would have to be done on the automaker's side - and what BT profile would it use?!

And hey - lets not forget that the remote control on your keyring already does this - and does it well. Remote unlock and remote start can be ordered with your car or added with an aftermarket alarm system - why put your eggs all in one basket? "Sorry boss, I can't make the meeting, my iPhone's battery is dead..."



the WiFi needs to be B,G, and N.
I think that at "N" speeds you'd see quite diminished returns due to the processor speed. However, if they can source much faster processors by the time that N is much more prevalent, that may be do-able.


Video conferencing should also be standard - with a camera that can actually work in low light situations, since more times than not, that is where people seem to be situated when they want to use the camera.
More of a technical challenge here. The lens is so small that it cannot let in very much light. So unless you find a sensor/chip that performs better in low light (Note to Steve - call Canon and license their DIGIC technology, mmmkay?), the only other recourse you have is to let more light in (larger lens) or slow your shutter speed a lot (at major risk of blurry images in still shots, slow framerate in video).


I'd rather see them spend a bit more time on the software. What I need as a businesss user is copy/paste, more app integration, and better download and attachment support.