Is it bad to always have iPhone plugged in?

rob22

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Jul 25, 2007
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#1
My phone is plugged in the majority of the time. I have it on the cradle when home and plugged in every time I'm at my desk (most of the day). My phone seems to retain its charge a lot better than most describe (on weekends and evenings when not plugged in as much). Does anyone know about these batteries and what is best for them (running it down, keeping them charged, etc.)?
 

Ag-Ryan

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Jul 25, 2007
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#2
keeping them on a charger most of the time is definitely not good, your battery's life will be significantly shorter than if you only charged it when you needed to and gave it a full charge when you did
 

drahardja

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Sep 30, 2007
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#3
keeping them on a charger most of the time is definitely not good, your battery's life will be significantly shorter than if you only charged it when you needed to and gave it a full charge when you did
This is a myth. Lithium ion batteries (which the iPhone uses) does not develop "memory" due to frequent charging like the old Ni-Cads did. In fact, purposely deep discharging Li-Ions puts strain on the battery and will shorten its life.

So plug and charge whenever you like. It's perfectly fine. Read http://www.apple.com/batteries/ for more info.
 

Ag-Ryan

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Jul 25, 2007
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This is a myth. Lithium ion batteries (which the iPhone uses) does not develop "memory" due to frequent charging like the old Ni-Cads did. In fact, purposely deep discharging Li-Ions puts strain on the battery and will shorten its life.

So plug and charge whenever you like. It's perfectly fine. Read http://www.apple.com/batteries/ for more info.
i was told it was a myth too, so i kept my laptop (which has a lithium ion battery) plugged in almost all of the time, and it used to hold a 6 hour charge, now it only holds a 2 hour charge after only a year.... so ill trust my own personal experience over what Apple or anyone else says about memory loss or whatever.

and Apple even says you need to send the battery in for replacement after a year or so... so obviously it will loose its charge after the "finite" number of times it will be charged, having it sit there and keep it charged all the time is just bringing it closer to that day in time.
 

meiphones_brill

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Nov 16, 2007
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#6
The battery will have a finite lifespan virtually regardless of what you do with it. Treat it however you like and your iPhone will need a new battery in 18 months. So I'd just use it however it is most convenient and in the mean time get used to the fact that the iPhone will need replacing or a refurb.

Apple would love you to buy a new one every 18 months - you can bet this was considered in the design spec when someone asked how much they could spend on the battery. This will coincide with the new model coming out - Apple offers a trade-in, and appears all squeaky-green. The users will forget about being angry because they'll be getting new technology and don't mind splashing out on that.
 

Sleeper

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Jul 21, 2007
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#7
This is a myth. Lithium ion batteries (which the iPhone uses) does not develop "memory" due to frequent charging like the old Ni-Cads did. In fact, purposely deep discharging Li-Ions puts strain on the battery and will shorten its life.

So plug and charge whenever you like. It's perfectly fine. Read http://www.apple.com/batteries/ for more info.
Sorry but that's simply not true. I direct you to this part:

"Each time you complete a charge cycle, it diminishes battery capacity slightly"

If you leave your unit constantly on charge it will constantly accrue charge to the cycle - it's a slow process but it does happen - so your battery will lose capacity faster than it has too.
 

drahardja

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Sep 30, 2007
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#8
Sorry but that's simply not true. I direct you to this part:

"Each time you complete a charge cycle, it diminishes battery capacity slightly"

If you leave your unit constantly on charge it will constantly accrue charge to the cycle - it's a slow process but it does happen - so your battery will lose capacity faster than it has too.
OK, let me clarify what I mean: There is no difference in lifespan whether you charge frequently or infrequently. There is a finite lifespan for each battery no matter what you do. All batteries will stop holding charge after some amount of usage regardless of how often you charge it up.

As for the statement you point out, read on where it says that the number of charge cycles that the battery can support is independent of how often you charge it; and that charge cycles are cumulative, such that if you charge up a battery when it's 50% depleted, then you've used up only 50% of a charge cycle, not 100%.

Keeping your unit plugged in is actually a good way of extending your battery life, because you're more likely to not use your battery at all when the charge is full, but rather use the power supply directly.
 

neph19d

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Jul 5, 2007
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#9
the iPhone battery is different. Letting it die is bad... Keeping it plugged in is actually good. Its backwards from what we all know with batteries. Its on Apples website
 

Lincoln

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Aug 11, 2007
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#10
I charge mine every other day - remember that after about 400 charges you'll start loosing battery life.
 

adseguy

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Jul 1, 2007
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#11
i was told it was a myth too, so i kept my laptop (which has a lithium ion battery) plugged in almost all of the time, and it used to hold a 6 hour charge, now it only holds a 2 hour charge after only a year.... so ill trust my own personal experience over what Apple or anyone else says about memory loss or whatever.

That's because you didn't move the electrons every once in a while. If you understood the physics of the lithium ION battery you would understand that moving the electrons through the metal is good in keeping corrosion down within the battery. This IS the way to get the most life out of an electronically controlled Li-ION battery: Keep it plugged in for "around" 2 weeks at a time then drain the battery to around 10% left and then charge it and repeat the cycle. Of course with our phones that would be pointless to keep it plugged in all the time. Just make sure to move those electrons in and out on a regular basis. That's why when storing a Li-ION battery you want to leave it at around 50% so that the electrons have a chance to move around a little. Even then, Li-ION batteries are some of the worst are cold-storage (not using a battery). Like others said they pretty much have a finite life span.
 

OJsakila

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Jul 15, 2007
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Jupiter's sulphur mines
#13
is the same battery that's in the iPhone also in the 4th gen 30gig color iPod? If so, then keep it charged. I always kept a full charge since it stayed in my car hooked up to monster fm transmitter. I had that iPod since 2004 and it works like a champ! I never really pulled it from the much from the car until I got the iPhone on iweek... I've since sold it to a fellow golf pro and I haven't heard a peep about the battery failing. He hits balls for several hours a day and then takes it home and synchs with the computer and charges it via USB nightly. Its been months now and he loves it....
 

psylichon

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Oct 31, 2007
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Philly
#15
Is there an aftermarket for third-party, out-of-warranty ipod battery replacement? If not, there should be. And if so, there will be one for the iPhone as well...