Leaving Your Purchased iTunes Content to an Heir Could Be a Problem

Rafagon

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#1
If you have the entire Beatles collection on CD or the entire works of Quentin Tarantino on Blu-ray discs, it's a no-brainer that if you die, you'll probably leave it to someone.

However, if you've purchased these items on iTunes (and some other digitial distributors of content), leaving them to someone else could be problematic or downright illegal.

When you purchase a song on iTunes, technically, you don't own it. You've simply been granted a non-transferable license to use it on your own Apple devices (limited to five in the case of computers, but I don't know if there's a limit on iPhones, iPod touches, or iPads).

Makes you wonder… should you pay a little more and buy that physical CD or borrow it from a friend and import it into iTunes?

An excerpt from the linked article:
Apple and Amazon grant “nontransferable” rights to use content, so if you buy the complete works of the Beatles on iTunes, you cannot give the “White Album” to your son and “Abbey Road” to your daughter.

According to Amazon’s terms of use, “You do not acquire any ownership rights in the software or music content.” Apple limits the use of digital files to Apple devices used by the account holder.
 

Rafagon

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#3
Yeah, when I die my family's first reaction will be to fight over who gets my Nickelback digital music. Guess they're in for a big disappointment, either way.
It’s not so much about their desire to obtain your digital content after your death, but more the desire of the person facing death who’s spent $1000+ on music and movies to leave the content to someone else. If I knew I had six months to live and I owned a vast movie library on iTunes, then I’d like to know that I have the option of leaving it to someone else rather than let it go to waste. I know that after my death they’ll be mourning their assses off and they won’t be immediately concerned with getting all my digital content, but it would be my desire to be able to leave it to them.

If you had something of value and you knew you weren’t going to be around to enjoy it, wouldn’t you prefer to give it to someone else rather than toss it in the trash?
 

Ledsteplin

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#4
It’s not so much about their desire to obtain your digital content after your death, but more the desire of the person facing death who’s spent $1000+ on music and movies to leave the content to someone else. If I knew I had six months to live and I owned a vast movie library on iTunes, then I’d like to know that I have the option of leaving it to someone else rather than let it go to waste. I know that after my death they’ll be mourning their assses off and they won’t be immediately concerned with getting all my digital content, but it would be my desire to be able to leave it to them.

If you had something of value and you knew you weren’t going to be around to enjoy it, wouldn’t you prefer to give it to someone else rather than toss it in the trash?
Leave them your Apple ID and password in your will. Problem solved.
 
#5
It’s not so much about their desire to obtain your digital content after your death, but more the desire of the person facing death who’s spent $1000+ on music and movies to leave the content to someone else. If I knew I had six months to live and I owned a vast movie library on iTunes, then I’d like to know that I have the option of leaving it to someone else rather than let it go to waste. I know that after my death they’ll be mourning their assses off and they won’t be immediately concerned with getting all my digital content, but it would be my desire to be able to leave it to them.

If you had something of value and you knew you weren’t going to be around to enjoy it, wouldn’t you prefer to give it to someone else rather than toss it in the trash?
IDK, If someone in my family was interested in my music enough to actually want it after I craoked, I probably would have been sharing my library with them already. Like Ledsteplin said, I'd give them my userid and PW. And I could be trolling you a bit too. ;)