Macbook charge iPhone as quick as iPad charger?

Discussion in 'iPhone 6' started by rollinfromhell, Dec 6, 2014.

  1. rollinfromhell

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    There was a post on this a few months back, about the iPhone being able to be charged as fast as the iPad charger would charge it. I remember reading this was on Mac Pro's (newer models of laptops and desktops). I am just curious if this IS true?
     
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  2. Rafagon

    Rafagon Genius
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    I was unaware of this... Thank you for sharing. A cursory peek around the Internet says that it is, in fact, true. Both of these articles also specifically mention OS X Yosemite, implying that the version of the OS that the "newer Mac" is running is a factor.

    I'm not sure which is the cutoff year for a Mac to be considered a "newer Mac."

    http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/news/comments/iphone-6-6-plus-support-2.1a-charging-ship-with-1a-adapters
    http://9to5mac.com/2014/09/22/iphone-6-and-6-plus-faster-charging/

    Apparently you can check the amperage currently being provided by your Mac's USB port to the iPhone plugged into it simply by using System Information.

    I tested this on my late 2009 iMac. It appears my iPhone is getting 1 Amp (500mA from "current available" plus 500mA from "extra operating current"):

    USB port amperage.jpg
     
    #2 Rafagon, Dec 6, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2014
  3. rollinfromhell

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    Very interesting indeed! Wonder if it charges like that in sleep mode.
     
  4. rollinfromhell

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    I'm bumping this thread for another question.. I used my 6 with the iPad charger. While it did charge very quick, I notice my battery didn't last as long. I had about 45 minutes cut off it. Is this a bad idea to keep doing and using the iPad charger, and will this degrade and shorten the battery since it isn't charging it as slow?

    I'm asking this because I got a 6 Plus yesterday and connected it about 2 hours ago on the normal iPhone charger, and it's taking a lot longer to charge. Put it on about 2 hours ago, and it's only at 63 percent still.
     
  5. MrMike6by9

    MrMike6by9 Evangelist
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    Does not the Plus have a larger battery than the 6?
     
  6. Europa

    Europa Moderator
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    It's fine to use the iPad charging adapter.
    Yep. And it takes longer to charge as a result.
     
  7. rollinfromhell

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    Took me about 3 and half hours to charge from 3 percent to a 100. I usually let it sit about 15-20 minutes at a 100 to take it off, since I think it's still charging at that point.

    I'm just wondering if this will make my battery die quicker during the day, if I use the iPad charging method. It "seemed" to with the 6, but just curious about that.
     
  8. MrMike6by9

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    I'd always heard that the iPhone and iPad use a special charging circuitry design to control things like power flow when charging to protect the battery. Similarly, I've heard/read that one should keep the "juices flowing" for best battery life. Don't always try to maintain a 100% charge nor let it run down to 0% too often. The battery will have a longer useful life with a moderated approach.
    YMMV
     
  9. Europa

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    Nope. The charge itself is the same and should last the same length of time. It was just quicker to charge it.
     
  10. RBNetEngr

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    Unless a charger cannot deliver the amount of current (amps) needed to charge the phone, the amount of current used to charge the device is determined by the 'load' (phone), not the 'source' (charger).

    Apple designs the devices to charge at a specific rate. So as long as you have a charger that can provide a minimum of 1 amp of current, the iPhone will charge at the maximum rate it was designed to charge. Likewise, an iPad needs a charger that can provide at least 2 amps of current, in order to charge at the designed rate.

    Think about this...you have a 120VAC or 240VAC (outside the USA) electrical outlet at home that has a circuit breaker that will allow up to 15 amps of current (16 amps outside the USA). You can plug a nightlight with a 7 watt lightbulb into the outlet, or you can plug a 1200w hair dryer into the same outlet. The load determines how much current will flow from the outlet. If the kid exceeds what the outlet can provide, the breaker will trip.

    It's the same principle with a phone charger.
     

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