MMS Messaging

herdmasa

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Jul 13, 2008
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#1
Does anyone know why the iPhone, even the iPhone 3G does not support MMS Messaging? I have heard there is an application for this, but it seems a bit silly to download an application for a simple feature on all phones these days...
 

Lincoln

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Aug 11, 2007
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#2
Apple doesn't think they need to include it. They want you to use email instead, and actually, that isn't as crazy as it sounds.

- John
 
Aug 30, 2007
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#3
MMS is a 'standard' feature on many phones, but in Apple's view (and they have a good point), it is a poor standard. Email is much more powerful.
Apple's stance will result in the industry being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century. Endure the pain on behalf of evolution.
 

Lincoln

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Aug 11, 2007
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#4
MMS is a 'standard' feature on many phones, but in Apple's view (and they have a good point), it is a poor standard. Email is much more powerful.
Apple's stance will result in the industry being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century. Endure the pain on behalf of evolution.
Exactly. I'll bring this point up again. On Apple's first Macs, floppy drives were not included, and people freaked out, the same way they do now about MMS. But look now, nobody uses floppy drives, and now, even CD drives are being pushed out of the way by wireless technology. This is why I stick the hypothesis that the iPhone will never get MMS. It will use email, and everybody else will follow.

- John
 

Panache010

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Aug 19, 2007
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#5
Exactly. I'll bring this point up again. On Apple's first Macs, floppy drives were not included, and people freaked out, the same way they do now about MMS. But look now, nobody uses floppy drives, and now, even CD drives are being pushed out of the way by wireless technology. This is why I stick the hypothesis that the iPhone will never get MMS. It will use email, and everybody else will follow.

- John
For the life of me I can not understand why people are still fussing over MMS. Like its been stated in 38 different threads since iDay Part1, each ###-#### that you are trying to MMS with has a suffux on the end which makes it an email address. There ya go, instant MMS.


 

RichR

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Sep 30, 2007
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#6
Wait, let me tell the 1000+ people I know that APPLE says they don't need it cause it 'out of date' and not as powerful as email and that they need to upgrade their phones or get an iPhone!

Come on man, thats poor planning and decision making on there part! Half the world uses MMS and its VERY popular!
 

Owgasm

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Jul 12, 2008
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#7
i actually never got the opportunity to use mms.
I was planning to with this phone, now gonskies.

So, how does this mms e-mail thing work.
I'm in Australia on Optus Network.

So when i send a pic to someone... put there phonenumber and whatever the address thing is for my network? or there network, thereforee needing to know what network they are on?
Free mms :O? that would be excellent.
 

Panache010

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#8
Wait, let me tell the 1000+ people I know that APPLE says they don't need it cause it 'out of date' and not as powerful as email and that they need to upgrade their phones or get an iPhone!

Come on man, thats poor planning and decision making on there part! Half the world uses MMS and its VERY popular!
I do not think it was "poor planning"! I see it as they were doing all a big favor. Since we are paying for "unlimited data" and sending email is considered data, APPLE & AT&T wants us to get our money's worth on that data package. Also, please do not take this the wrong way...but the poor planning and decision making didn't stop you from buying the product.
 

Panache010

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#9
i actually never got the opportunity to use mms.
I was planning to with this phone, now gonskies.

So, how does this mms e-mail thing work.
I'm in Australia on Optus Network.

So when i send a pic to someone... put there phonenumber and whatever the address thing is for my network? or there network, thereforee needing to know what network they are on?
Free mms :O? that would be excellent.
EXACTLY! Use the address for THEIR network. Type is as you would any standard email address. You can not send MMS over seas for free but you can email all the live long day without being hit with international text charges.
 

Owgasm

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Jul 12, 2008
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#10
hmms so where do i get these mms addresses from, i'll save them as a note :)
This is great news. :D:D:D:D
 

Panache010

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#11

Lincoln

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Aug 11, 2007
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#12
Wait, let me tell the 1000+ people I know that APPLE says they don't need it cause it 'out of date' and not as powerful as email and that they need to upgrade their phones or get an iPhone!

Come on man, thats poor planning and decision making on there part! Half the world uses MMS and its VERY popular!
Did you read my post? This is a perfect example of how people acted my Apple left out the floppy drives.

- John
 

Jmusiq

New Member
Jun 25, 2008
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#13
I've been using mms slot from my last phone. It's just more Convinient.

I don't really mind Using email to send mms but some other peoples phone doesn't support that feature and on some phones it's a hassle just to go online.

IMO it's kinnda stupid Apple is trying to push using email for mms. Why are they trying to push something that's already working so well and so convinient.
 

Panache010

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#14
I fully understand where you are coming from Musiq. It is more convient to know someones # instead of their # are carrier. I guess MMS was never really big to me because a lot of MMS messages I did get was just some freaky fwd that I could care less to see anyways.
 
#15

Panache010

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#16
So what happens when they send back an MMS to you? Does it just arrive as an email message?

Yes, it comes in email format. When they reply, it comes to the same email address you sent it from.
 

mlass

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Jun 19, 2007
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#17
It is said that by 2004, SMS was the favorite method of businesss communication over emails, voice mail or even voice calls.

Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) is a standard for telephone messaging systems that allows sending messages that include multimedia objects (images, audio, video, rich text) and not just text as in Short Message Service (SMS).

There are some interesting challenges with MMS that do not exist with SMS:
  • Content adaptation: Multimedia content created by one brand of MMS phone may not be entirely compatible with the capabilities of the recipients' MMS phone. In the MMS architecture, the recipient MMSC is responsible for providing for content adaptation (e.g., image resizing, audio codec transcoding, etc.), if this feature is enabled by the mobile network operator. When content adaptation is supported by a network operator, its MMS subscribers enjoy compatibility with a larger network of MMS users than would otherwise be available.
  • Distribution lists: Current MMS specifications do not include distribution lists nor methods by which large numbers of recipients can be conveniently addressed, particularly by content providers, called Value Added Service Providers (VASPs) in 3GPP. Since most SMSC vendors have adopted FTP as an ad-hoc method by which large distribution lists are transferred to the SMSC prior to being used in a bulk-messaging SMS submission, it is expected that MMSC vendors will also adopt FTP.
  • Bulk messaging: The flow of peer-to-peer MMS messaging involves several over-the-air transactions that become inefficient when MMS is used to send messages to large numbers of subscribers, as is typically the case for VASPs. For example, when one MMS message is submitted to a very large number of recipients, it is possible to receive a delivery report and read-reply report for each and every recipient. Future MMS specification work is likely to optimize and reduce the transactional overhead for the bulk-messaging case.
  • Handset Configuration: Unlike SMS, MMS requires a number of handset parameters to be set. Poor handset configuration is often blamed as the first point of failure for many users. Service settings are sometimes preconfigured on the handset, but mobile operators are now looking at new device management technologies as a means of delivering the necessary settings for data services (MMS, WAP, etc.) via over-the-air programming (OTA).
  • WAP Push: Few mobile network operators offer direct connectivity to their MMSCs for content providers. This has resulted in many content providers using WAP push as the only method available to deliver 'rich content' to mobile handsets. WAP push enables 'rich content' to be delivered to a handset by specifying the URL (via binary SMS) of a pre-compiled MMS, hosted on a content provider's web server. A downside of WAP push is that from a billing perspective this content is typically billed at data rates rather than as an MMS. These charges can be significant and result in 'bill shock' for consumers.
Although the standard does not specify a maximum size for a message, 300 kB is the current recommended size used by networks due to some limitations on the WAP gateway side.
 

Panache010

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Aug 19, 2007
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#18
It is said that by 2004, SMS was the favorite method of businesss communication over emails, voice mail or even voice calls.

Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) is a standard for telephone messaging systems that allows sending messages that include multimedia objects (images, audio, video, rich text) and not just text as in Short Message Service (SMS).

There are some interesting challenges with MMS that do not exist with SMS:
  • Content adaptation: Multimedia content created by one brand of MMS phone may not be entirely compatible with the capabilities of the recipients' MMS phone. In the MMS architecture, the recipient MMSC is responsible for providing for content adaptation (e.g., image resizing, audio codec transcoding, etc.), if this feature is enabled by the mobile network operator. When content adaptation is supported by a network operator, its MMS subscribers enjoy compatibility with a larger network of MMS users than would otherwise be available.
  • Distribution lists: Current MMS specifications do not include distribution lists nor methods by which large numbers of recipients can be conveniently addressed, particularly by content providers, called Value Added Service Providers (VASPs) in 3GPP. Since most SMSC vendors have adopted FTP as an ad-hoc method by which large distribution lists are transferred to the SMSC prior to being used in a bulk-messaging SMS submission, it is expected that MMSC vendors will also adopt FTP.
  • Bulk messaging: The flow of peer-to-peer MMS messaging involves several over-the-air transactions that become inefficient when MMS is used to send messages to large numbers of subscribers, as is typically the case for VASPs. For example, when one MMS message is submitted to a very large number of recipients, it is possible to receive a delivery report and read-reply report for each and every recipient. Future MMS specification work is likely to optimize and reduce the transactional overhead for the bulk-messaging case.
  • Handset Configuration: Unlike SMS, MMS requires a number of handset parameters to be set. Poor handset configuration is often blamed as the first point of failure for many users. Service settings are sometimes preconfigured on the handset, but mobile operators are now looking at new device management technologies as a means of delivering the necessary settings for data services (MMS, WAP, etc.) via over-the-air programming (OTA).
  • WAP Push: Few mobile network operators offer direct connectivity to their MMSCs for content providers. This has resulted in many content providers using WAP push as the only method available to deliver 'rich content' to mobile handsets. WAP push enables 'rich content' to be delivered to a handset by specifying the URL (via binary SMS) of a pre-compiled MMS, hosted on a content provider's web server. A downside of WAP push is that from a billing perspective this content is typically billed at data rates rather than as an MMS. These charges can be significant and result in 'bill shock' for consumers.
Although the standard does not specify a maximum size for a message, 300 kB is the current recommended size used by networks due to some limitations on the WAP gateway side.
Interesting. THX for sharing
 

aggieman

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Jul 6, 2007
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#19
I do not think it was "poor planning"! I see it as they were doing all a big favor. Since we are paying for "unlimited data" and sending email is considered data, APPLE & AT&T wants us to get our money's worth on that data package. Also, please do not take this the wrong way...but the poor planning and decision making didn't stop you from buying the product.
While I'm in partial agreement, mms is still the standard for sending pics between phones. While I would prefer it all be done by email it's silly to not at least allow the iPhone to receive mms messages. I don't mind emailing them but most of my friends use free flip phones that don't have email capability. Also it's crap to expect everyone I know to send me a pic in a different manner than they do everyone else. And don't get me started on viewmymessage.com
 

lmac630

New Member
Jul 8, 2008
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#20
you can still text if you pay extra though right?