new features on Google maps!

Platinum

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Jun 27, 2007
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#3
Yeah, if you push the button to pinpoint your location and then do it agian once you're initially pinpointed it will zoom in even further on your location.... It goes right to my house when I do it a second time.
 

Bravo

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Nov 14, 2007
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#4
Yeah, if you push the button to pinpoint your location and then do it agian once you're initially pinpointed it will zoom in even further on your location.... It goes right to my house when I do it a second time.
it does? just tried it and no go, I am in LA so pretty sure I got the signal strength.
 

Bravo

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Nov 14, 2007
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#6
its on, but not getting solid wifi now, zoomed in and hit find button again, and said it couldnt, so looks like wifi is the key to getting extra close.

Thanks!
 

minivini

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Jul 6, 2007
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#7
Ok, THAT'S pretty tight. When you switch on wifi, it DOES make a huge difference! I was about a quarter mile off prior to trying it on wifi. now it appears to be within feet.
 

kimo

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Aug 7, 2007
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#8
its on, but not getting solid wifi now, zoomed in and hit find button again, and said it couldnt, so looks like wifi is the key to getting extra close.

Thanks!

If you can find your location on the map (knowing where you live) you can add a push pin to that point and rename it with you address. This can be used as a start location when you need directions. I tried it and the google maps used my push pin as the start location. So if you are traveling, you could put a push pin of where you are staying and then get directions to events, restaurants, etc. Add in the web site mobile.earthcomber.com (change to location you are at) and you should be able to find a lot of stuff.
 

ZodiacfreaK

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Jan 11, 2007
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#9
Seriously though, how many times do you need to know where you are when you are within distance of a WiFi network. And also how many times are you going to be lost in the desert and not be able to use this because there are no cell towers. Seems completely useless to me, but I am sure someone will come up with a use.
 

askewed

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Jun 22, 2007
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#10
Seriously though, how many times do you need to know where you are when you are within distance of a WiFi network. And also how many times are you going to be lost in the desert and not be able to use this because there are no cell towers. Seems completely useless to me, but I am sure someone will come up with a use.
It's to make getting driving directions easier...
 

ZodiacfreaK

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Jan 11, 2007
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#11
It's to make getting driving directions easier...
How? Triangulation isn't accurate enough to know what street you are on. And its not even close. With WiFi it could, but then that isn't practical for driving. Please elaborate on how it could accomplish that.
 

Bravo

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Nov 14, 2007
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#15
just moved to LA and can tell you this is a GREAT THING!

You make a wrong turn, get dropped off somewhere, meet people then bounce somewhere else, park and want to mark where you are.

VERY HAPPY with this!

Not as good as my TOM TOM but still very cool
 

JoeT

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Dec 18, 2007
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Tampa, FL
#17
actually, it is stated in the keynote that triangulation uses towers AND wifi:laugh2:

Aaaaaand it's still impossible. There is no way to correlate the location of a WiFi Access Point to a physical location. You *might* check the public IP address and determine the city and state from that, but certainly nothing close to what you can via cell triangulation. Only the ISP knows where the subscriber (and thereforee the AP) is located, and I'm sure that Apple hasn't made any type of arrangement to get at THAT data.

OK, just thought of one more way: The iPhone gets the MAC (not Mac) address of the AP and references a known list of hotspots - but that isn't going to help with your home AP, unless a whole lot of people are geomapping the entire WiFi world constantly and uploading MAC addresses with reasonable lat/longs all day long.

So if you've got a technical argument you can make for WiFI access improving Google Maps' location feature, I'm all ears, but knowing the technology and industry behind it as I do, I don't see a way that it's possible.
 

Jhors2

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Nov 11, 2007
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#19
They could be either using a whois lookup and crosschecking that with the google maps database to achieve a potential address. Or maybe a database that has been accumulated in cities where people have checked WAPs and cataloged them online. There are a number of things, but regardless WiFi enabling does make it MUCH more accurate.
 

Devori

New Member
Jun 15, 2007
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Long island NY
#20
Aaaaaand it's still impossible. There is no way to correlate the location of a WiFi Access Point to a physical location. You *might* check the public IP address and determine the city and state from that, but certainly nothing close to what you can via cell triangulation. Only the ISP knows where the subscriber (and thereforee the AP) is located, and I'm sure that Apple hasn't made any type of arrangement to get at THAT data.

OK, just thought of one more way: The iPhone gets the MAC (not Mac) address of the AP and references a known list of hotspots - but that isn't going to help with your home AP, unless a whole lot of people are geomapping the entire WiFi world constantly and uploading MAC addresses with reasonable lat/longs all day long.

So if you've got a technical argument you can make for WiFI access improving Google Maps' location feature, I'm all ears, but knowing the technology and industry behind it as I do, I don't see a way that it's possible.
there is no doubt you know what your talking about.. all i know is what i heard on the keynote.. i could care less HOW it works.. as long as it does!