Recent article on Apple's website about iPhone...

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dblaron

New Member
Bronze
Feb 17, 2007
58
0
0
#2
that was the most honest and realistic article I have yet to read about the iPhone. I liked it because it just gave you the facts and that is how a company desides how they should approach their next product. With that you know you will see more and more faster and larger storage phones to come. the way smart phones should of been for years.
 

p9939068

New Member
Bronze
Apr 19, 2007
35
0
0
#3
"Its competitors had better hope the iPhone can’t get a dial tone – because if it does, the rest of the industry’s in for a big shakeup."

LOL!
 

Kabeyun

Member
Silver
Jan 10, 2007
665
0
16
Northeast US
#4
This article was a fun read, but I think it should be taken with a grain of salt. The stats are based on a very small sample size (3.5 millionths of the cell phone market). All projected data on phone manufacturer and carrier market shares are extrapolated from survey responses in this sample.

The graphs look good, but ignore other major issues, such as Moto or other manufacturers developing a "hip, cool" phone that may compete effectively with iPhone if in no other area than price point. As Yogi Berra said, "Prediction is hard, especially when it concerns the future." If you discount other variables, it makes it a lot easier.

Finally, there are some glaring inconsistencies in the article. First, the Interest v. Price table doesn't make sense to me: it actually suggests that far more people would buy a 4GB iPhone (53%) for <$200 than would buy an 8GB (37%) iPhone for the same price! That's a marketing impossibility (who here would get a 4GB phone if you could get an 8GB phone for the same price? Anyone? Bueller?), and calls the entire sampling, statistical treatment, or both into question. Then, in paragraph 10 Mr. Carton states, "Currently, Motorola (33%) remains the leading manufacturer among Alliance cell phone owners" and then in the next paragraph (before the compelling-looking graph) he states that Motorola's share has fallen "to just 17% currently." Well which "currently" is it, 33% or 17%?

I'm as much as an Apple fan as anyone, and I do believe the iPhone will succeed. But as a man of science I am a little disappointed when statistics and hyperbole are used to dress up hope to look like certainty. He could be right, but I can't say that this write-up showed me anything real.

-K, the party pooper
 

dblaron

New Member
Bronze
Feb 17, 2007
58
0
0
#5
This article was a fun read, but I think it should be taken with a grain of salt. The stats are based on a very small sample size (3.5 millionths of the cell phone market). All projected data on phone manufacturer and carrier market shares are extrapolated from survey responses in this sample.

The graphs look good, but ignore other major issues, such as Moto or other manufacturers developing a &quot;hip, cool&quot; phone that may compete effectively with iPhone if in no other area than price point. As Yogi Berra said, &quot;Prediction is hard, especially when it concerns the future.&quot; If you discount other variables, it makes it a lot easier.

Finally, there are some glaring inconsistencies in the article. First, the Interest v. Price table doesn't make sense to me: it actually suggests that far more people would buy a 4GB iPhone (53%) for <$200 than would buy an 8GB (37%) iPhone for the same price! That's a marketing impossibility (who here would get a 4GB phone if you could get an 8GB phone for the same price? Anyone? Bueller?), and calls the entire sampling, statistical treatment, or both into question. Then, in paragraph 10 Mr. Carton states, &quot;Currently, Motorola (33%) remains the leading manufacturer among Alliance cell phone owners&quot; and then in the next paragraph (before the compelling-looking graph) he states that Motorola's share has fallen &quot;to just 17% currently.&quot; Well which &quot;currently&quot; is it, 33% or 17%?

I'm as much as an Apple fan as anyone, and I do believe the iPhone will succeed. But as a man of science I am a little disappointed when statistics and hyperbole are used to dress up hope to look like certainty. He could be right, but I can't say that this write-up showed me anything real.

-K, the party pooper
Ok I agree with you on some points. yet being a man of science as you ''say''. You need to take into account all variables. even if it is statistics. because if you don't you might miss something that was there to begin with. As for the stats given in the article I think that they were just typos. Now for the study itself. most studies are this small the other studies are for the big dogs. the people who make the products. that is why a lot of studies done are wrong. now I am not trying to I disagree with you. I just think that out of all the articles written on the net today about the iPhone are crap. this was the first one I have seen that wasn't really for nor against the iPhone. as for the price servay, they probably did two different servays. opps on their part. the one thing you are right about is that there is nothing about future phone competition. but I think they leave that out because they really don't know what the iPhone is about. and for them to do so could cause them to lose accountability. We don't even know fully about the iPhone.
 

robhon

New Member
Silver
Mar 17, 2007
620
0
0
#6
Bravo, Kabeyun, for your skepticism! I always believe a healthy dose of skepticism keep us all on our toes. But I would have to say that I think 3489 respondents is likely a significant enough of a number for statistical purposes, depending on how they found the 3489 people. That's not to suggest that their interpretations of the data are correct though.