The fat finger question

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Michael Baturin

Evangelist
Gold
Jul 11, 2007
1,744
238
63
31
South Jersey
#3
People question everything about this thing. The people who usually ask that are the people who nothing about anything. Therefore, I respond with something along the lines of "Nope, the iPhone has a computer inside which reads the electric signal from your finger and can pinpoint it to .005mm of where the strongest charge is" Which probably isn't true (it might be haha), but it shuts em up, (and concurrently makes me look like a geek).
 

Crash Override

Member
Bronze
Aug 9, 2007
178
2
18
#5
They should ask the "fingernail" question.

My wife has long nails, and she has a problem with everything from the touch-screen on my car stereo/dvd system to the iPhone. Luckily for her, she prefers the low-tech devices and leaves the gadgets to me.
 

brojimh

New Member
Bronze
Aug 1, 2007
142
0
0
Morris, AL
#7
People question everything about this thing. The people who usually ask that are the people who nothing about anything. Therefore, I respond with something along the lines of "Nope, the iPhone has a computer inside which reads the electric signal from your finger and can pinpoint it to .005mm of where the strongest charge is" Which probably isn't true (it might be haha), but it shuts em up, (and concurrently makes me look like a geek).
haha, that is great! I will be using that from now on if it's ok. . .
 

i_poo

New Member
Aug 9, 2007
11
0
0
#9
Here's an answer I found on another forum... I don't know how accurate it is.. but it sounds pretty correct. If anyone can verify this, that would be great.

There's a grid array of nanocapacitors that sit just below the screen, each one charged with enough electricity that they'll arc through the glass if there's a ground in contact with it. So you touch the glass, the capacitors directly under your finger release their charge into your finger (but the charge is so incredibly small that you could never ever feel it), and the iPhone knows where you're touching by which capacitors are requesting more electricity.

So, that said, it only works with your fingers and other thin, conductive materials that your skin's in direct contact with. It will also work with a hot dog


One I heard today, which was simply enough:

static electricity

Here's another solution someone else is doing... Undergoing "whittling surgery" for their fat fingers: http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/organgrinder/2007/08/iPhone_fingers_too_fat.html
 

Michael Baturin

Evangelist
Gold
Jul 11, 2007
1,744
238
63
31
South Jersey
#11
Here's an answer I found on another forum... I don't know how accurate it is.. but it sounds pretty correct. If anyone can verify this, that would be great.

There's a grid array of nanocapacitors that sit just below the screen, each one charged with enough electricity that they'll arc through the glass if there's a ground in contact with it. So you touch the glass, the capacitors directly under your finger release their charge into your finger (but the charge is so incredibly small that you could never ever feel it), and the iPhone knows where you're touching by which capacitors are requesting more electricity.

So, that said, it only works with your fingers and other thin, conductive materials that your skin's in direct contact with. It will also work with a hot dog


One I heard today, which was simply enough:

static electricity

Here's another solution someone else is doing... Undergoing "whittling surgery" for their fat fingers: http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/organgrinder/2007/08/iPhone_fingers_too_fat.html
Holy crap! I was kinda right. I knew those years of Computer and Electrical engineering school counted for something haha.
 

brojimh

New Member
Bronze
Aug 1, 2007
142
0
0
Morris, AL
#12
Here's an answer I found on another forum... I don't know how accurate it is.. but it sounds pretty correct. If anyone can verify this, that would be great.

There's a grid array of nanocapacitors that sit just below the screen, each one charged with enough electricity that they'll arc through the glass if there's a ground in contact with it. So you touch the glass, the capacitors directly under your finger release their charge into your finger (but the charge is so incredibly small that you could never ever feel it), and the iPhone knows where you're touching by which capacitors are requesting more electricity.

So, that said, it only works with your fingers and other thin, conductive materials that your skin's in direct contact with. It will also work with a hot dog

One I heard today, which was simply enough:

static electricity

Here's another solution someone else is doing... Undergoing "whittling surgery" for their fat fingers: http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/organgrinder/2007/08/iPhone_fingers_too_fat.html
HAHA I've heard of people having "hot dog fingers!"