The iPhone is more fiction than reality

Lips2000

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I welcome dissenting opinions

I, for one, am happy to hear a dissenting opinion re: the iPhone. Oric has have every right to express his dis-satisfaction with an iPhone he may or may not own.

To the points:

1. True but I would add a definative "It can be added"

2. False. It will stream a little site called YouTube and a wildly popular format called Quicktime.

3. Semi-False. At this time, the iPhone does not support AD2P (Stereo) but I am able to connect it to my TomTom 510 and play it over my car stereo just fine. The playback controls in my TomTom work just fine to control the iPhone. (Added bonus: all my contacts were able to be uploaded into my TomTom's built in directory; something my Palm 700w was never able to accomplish.)

4. True, but then, why would I want to when I can just point to where I want to edit? Arrow keys seem outdated now.

5. My BT headset (Jabra 150 and Jabra 350) work flawlessly...both ways. Sorry you are having trouble or heard of this trouble.

6. False. I create appointments and add contacts all the time on the iPhone and they "magically" appear in my Outlook. Not sure I need to create groups on the iPhone anyways...that is what I have already done in Outlook. If you waited until the iPhone came out to get organized, that seems to be a personal issue.

7. True and False. A widget, by nature, is informational. What widget do I need to "sync" to? The weather is the weather and the market information is...well, you get the idea. Regarding notes: I understand this will come with Leopard so, unlike some, I have the patience to wait.

8. False. Any battery operated device will expend energy and drain it's charge with use. Seems obvious, doesn't it? My question to you is: If the iPhone sucks so bad, what are you constantly using it for, ergo, draining the battery, during the course of a single day to warrant daily charging? Regarding the non-replacable battery: How do you think that the iPhone got to be so thin? A replaceable battery would require a much fatter case and hardware. Design is an element of the iPhone many people overlook and I would gladly trade an additional $79.00 (perhaps in 2 or 3 years) for the design.


Mark

P.S. - Please forgive any spelling/grammar errors. My hands often do not keep up with my thought process. ;)
 

joe

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To the last 7 posters: argue the point and not the person. If you can't, just leave this thread alone. Flames are not permitted. Thanks. I'll leave this thread open in case of further debate on the OP.

-K
Oops, thought that's what I was doing. :(
 

damstr

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If the way you compare one phone to the next is by coming up with a checklist of features, and comparing them, it's easy to convince yourself that many other phones are better than the iPhone.

But, this completely ignores the much more important fact that everything the iPhone does it does so well that it makes the other phones look like a joke. Web browsing, email reading, and basic phone features of the iPhone are all so much better than everything else out there that I don't mind the few things that it can't yet do. This is the first phone that I actually want to browse the web on, and read my email on. So although it doesn't have 3G, it's actually much better than my Nokia e61i that did (at least for me). The truth is that the Nokia felt very CPU limited, so even with 3G the rendering was very slow.

I have had spent time with several iPhone critics, and after a five minute demo every one of them has wanted to ditch their phone and buy an iPhone.

I am confident that I could be just as effective on most people that are holding off from buying it because they are waiting for something like 3G, builtin GPS, or exchange integration.
Well ofcourse after a 5 min demo people would really want one....but that's with almost EVERYTHING.Take cars for example, looking at them or taking them for a test drive they might seem nice but after owning one for a while you start to notice all the problems that you can only experience if you own that car and drive it often. Again this is with almost all things not just the iPhone.Another example is my Palm Treo...using it for the first time for 5 mins was great...ive owned one for a couple months now and hate it. Crashes all the time...My point is is that you can't use your statement of the "5 min demo and everyone wanted one" as an argument because that's with everything.
 

TrippalHealicks

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To the last 7 posters (except joe): argue the point and not the person. If you can't, just leave this thread alone. Flames are not permitted. Thanks. I'll leave this thread open in case of further debate on the OP.

-K

Understood.
Editing my post, accordingly. :)
 

Hondamaker

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May 14, 2007
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5. Blue tooth head set use to work both ways with my Treo 650, with the iPhone, it only works with out going calls not incoming. I have the Plantronics 510. Mantra; It is not a computer
Please explain this. I have the same BT ear piece, and it works with both outgoing and incoming calls.
 

bigviking

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No other phone can say this ...

Well ofcourse after a 5 min demo people would really want one....but that's with almost EVERYTHING.Take cars for example, looking at them or taking them for a test drive they might seem nice but after owning one for a while you start to notice all the problems that you can only experience if you own that car and drive it often. Again this is with almost all things not just the iPhone.Another example is my Palm Treo...using it for the first time for 5 mins was great...ive owned one for a couple months now and hate it. Crashes all the time...My point is is that you can't use your statement of the "5 min demo and everyone wanted one" as an argument because that's with everything.
There isn't a single other phone on the market that will make almost everyone with something else want to ditch it after a five minute demo. I have owned the best of the best smartphones, and was never able to impress anyone even 10% as much as I can with this. The web, email, & ipod portion are just so much better than everything else (MS exchange issues aside) that a comparison isn't even sensible.
 

TrippalHealicks

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There isn't a single other phone on the market that will make almost everyone with something else want to ditch it after a five minute demo. I have owned the best of the best smartphones, and was never able to impress anyone even 10% as much as I can with this. The web, email, & ipod portion are just so much better than everything else (MS exchange issues aside) that a comparison isn't even sensible.
That's because (like I said in another post) your average consumer values aesthetics more than functionality. They'll "oow" and "aah" over all the pretty stuff it does, we're just lucky enough to know (and experience) that it not only looks good while doing it, it does it very well, too. ;)
 

tharmsen

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There isn't a single other phone on the market that will make almost everyone with something else want to ditch it after a five minute demo. I have owned the best of the best smartphones, and was never able to impress anyone even 10% as much as I can with this. The web, email, & ipod portion are just so much better than everything else (MS exchange issues aside) that a comparison isn't even sensible.
That's so true. While I was impressed with my other PDA phones over the years, the vast majority of the people I demo'ed them to weren't all that impressed, certainly not enough to go buy one for themselves. Most people found them to be excessively complex and hard to navigate/use.

The exact opposite has been the case with my iPhone. I've had so many people on the train ask me what I was playing with, and when I showed them they were so wow'ed they were talking about going to investigate buying one for themselves. The people range from being 20-something to 40-something. This phone has BROAD appeal, far more than I thought it would before owning one.
 

bigviking

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True, because for web and email, "pretty" also means functional

That's because (like I said in another post) your average consumer values aesthetics more than functionality. They'll "oow" and "aah" over all the pretty stuff it does, we're just lucky enough to know (and experience) that it not only looks good while doing it, it does it very well, too. ;)
I agree completely. Because the web and email look "pretty", this is actually the first phone that presents things so nicely that I actually want to browse the web and read my email on it.

Now I'm not the kind of person that will send 30+ emails a day from my iPhone. Honestly, I don't even send 30 a month from my laptop. I believe that email is overly used, and is actually a fairly poor form of communication. It's really only good for distributing specific information to a wide audience, it's really not a substitute for good communication. These days it seams that for many of the professionals that I know, basically managing their email has become their job. This is an indicator of a much bigger problem, and smartphones really will never address this issue. However, the iPhone has the best email reader of any device on the market.
 

IceTrAiN

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Finally. I have figured out what I am going to do with my weekend.

I do not like, nor care for, underwater basket weaving. Therefore, I am going to go find a underwater basket weaving community forum, and I'm going to go on there and tell them everything that is wrong with their sport, just to emasculate myself and make it seem as if I have any clue what the hell I'm talking about!

Thanks for starting some crap today, Jerry Springer.

Go play with your legos. Troll.
 

snake Eyes

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Steve Jobs always walks on the dark side of life, and his introduction of the iPhone earlier in the year is just another one of those occasions. (Anyone who has read iWoz will know what I am referring to.)

What will the iPhone not do:

Before I go into the various functions that the iPhone lacks, Steve's Job's (Apple Computer's) official mantra is that iPhone is not a computer to most of one's questions.

1. It does not have the basic "cut and paste" that most PDAs have. The iPhone is actually a regression in that respect. (Mantra, This is not a computer)

2. It will not do streaming video. Mantra; It is not a computer

3. The iPod features will not play back through any blue tooth features, nor will it play back through your car stereo using the normal "monster cable" to select an fm station. Mantra; It is not a computer

4. No arrow keys to maneuver your way on text. All that is offered is a backwards moving delete key, or you can try stabbing the iPhone screen in order to reposition the cursor. Mantra; It is not a computer

5. Blue tooth head set use to work both ways with my Treo 650, with the iPhone, it only works with out going calls not incoming. I have the Plantronics 510. Mantra; It is not a computer

6. The iPhone is mostly a slave unit of the laptop computer. Most of the syncing is one way with the real work being done at the computer end, not at the iPhone end. Example, one can not create a group in the iPhone address book (contacts), it has to be done at the computer end. Mantra; It is not a computer

7. There is no sync with the home computer of the iPhone widget notes. No, it does not sync with sticky notes. It sort of hangs out there in "Job's Limbo land." Mantra; It is not a computer

8. The iPhone will not stand up to a normal daily usage without having to recharge its batteries at least once during the day. At the rate of power usage it consumes, the battery will not last long, in-spite of the Apple's mantra of it lasting longer than anything on the market. It is interesting to note that when the iPhone was released, Apple also released a formal statement where they would charge you $75.00 to replace the iPhone battery, and rent you an iPhone for $29.00. Talk about lack of confidence in your own product. How much of a no brainer would it have been to put a door on the back of your iPhone and have the user change their own battery. Mantra; It is not a computer. (Was Job's serious that he has 250 patents on this device.)

Job's needs to get some serious fixes out to the market place soon, otherwise the Asian market will eat him up when they bring out their "reversed engineered" versions of the iPhone at Christmas time.

When I questioned the Apple rep on the mantra of "it is not a computer" I told him to go back and review Steve Job's "dog and pony show performance" that he presented at the mac convention, and also review his statement that there would be a delay in the release of the Leopard operating system for the laptop and desktop, because the software engineers responsible for that, were working on the release of the iPhone system since the iPhone was to be a mini version of the Mac OS X system. I also asked about the fact that some of the iPhone's operating system's features were only one way, residing mostly in the lap top end. His reply was that they now refer to the operating system of the iPhone as the OS X, they removed the word Mac, before Mac OS X, so that consumers would not be confused. Talk about a snow job. ( or maybe instead of calling it a snow job, one would be correct in calling it a "Steve Job."

My take on this, is that the phone was not ready for prime time, and that it should have been released about a year later. However, when you can add close to a half million dollars to your profit margin within a week, greed always wins out. Thus, we have become beta testers for Apple's iPhone, and here I thought that this only occurred with Microsoft in the release of its operating systems.

When you hype your product as much as Job's has, one would expect forward stepping to what one is already accustom to, not several steps backward. Besides the lack of a "cut & paste" feature, I have noticed that I do not have the same coverage with my same Cingular account that I previously had with my Treo 650 using Cingular. The antenna on the iPhone is weak, and it drops calls more frequently than I ever encountered with my Treo 650, using the same carrier.

That is why I made the opening statement that the iPhone is more fiction than reality! If you trying to decide on whether the iPhone is for you, WAIT until Apple gets it right. Who knows maybe Job's will wake up to the bad press that is soon to follow this device, or maybe his Asian competitors' will release their product with a "step forward" type of technology.

omg someone give this man A HUG ! dammit
 

Standog

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By Christmas, the market will be flooded with iPhone look alikes, and they will not come with the same deifcits as the original.
There are hyundai's that "look like" Camrys and Vista even "looks like" OSX, but there's a real difference between the real thing and the knock off.
 

ps49556n

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Jun 21, 2007
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Steve Jobs always walks on the dark side of life, and his introduction of the iPhone earlier in the year is just another one of those occasions. (Anyone who has read iWoz will know what I am referring to.)

What will the iPhone not do:

Before I go into the various functions that the iPhone lacks, Steve's Job's (Apple Computer's) official mantra is that iPhone is not a computer to most of one's questions.

1. It does not have the basic "cut and paste" that most PDAs have. The iPhone is actually a regression in that respect. (Mantra, This is not a computer)

2. It will not do streaming video. Mantra; It is not a computer

3. The iPod features will not play back through any blue tooth features, nor will it play back through your car stereo using the normal "monster cable" to select an fm station. Mantra; It is not a computer

4. No arrow keys to maneuver your way on text. All that is offered is a backwards moving delete key, or you can try stabbing the iPhone screen in order to reposition the cursor. Mantra; It is not a computer

5. Blue tooth head set use to work both ways with my Treo 650, with the iPhone, it only works with out going calls not incoming. I have the Plantronics 510. Mantra; It is not a computer

6. The iPhone is mostly a slave unit of the laptop computer. Most of the syncing is one way with the real work being done at the computer end, not at the iPhone end. Example, one can not create a group in the iPhone address book (contacts), it has to be done at the computer end. Mantra; It is not a computer

7. There is no sync with the home computer of the iPhone widget notes. No, it does not sync with sticky notes. It sort of hangs out there in "Job's Limbo land." Mantra; It is not a computer

8. The iPhone will not stand up to a normal daily usage without having to recharge its batteries at least once during the day. At the rate of power usage it consumes, the battery will not last long, in-spite of the Apple's mantra of it lasting longer than anything on the market. It is interesting to note that when the iPhone was released, Apple also released a formal statement where they would charge you $75.00 to replace the iPhone battery, and rent you an iPhone for $29.00. Talk about lack of confidence in your own product. How much of a no brainer would it have been to put a door on the back of your iPhone and have the user change their own battery. Mantra; It is not a computer. (Was Job's serious that he has 250 patents on this device.)

Job's needs to get some serious fixes out to the market place soon, otherwise the Asian market will eat him up when they bring out their "reversed engineered" versions of the iPhone at Christmas time.

When I questioned the Apple rep on the mantra of "it is not a computer" I told him to go back and review Steve Job's "dog and pony show performance" that he presented at the mac convention, and also review his statement that there would be a delay in the release of the Leopard operating system for the laptop and desktop, because the software engineers responsible for that, were working on the release of the iPhone system since the iPhone was to be a mini version of the Mac OS X system. I also asked about the fact that some of the iPhone's operating system's features were only one way, residing mostly in the lap top end. His reply was that they now refer to the operating system of the iPhone as the OS X, they removed the word Mac, before Mac OS X, so that consumers would not be confused. Talk about a snow job. ( or maybe instead of calling it a snow job, one would be correct in calling it a "Steve Job."

My take on this, is that the phone was not ready for prime time, and that it should have been released about a year later. However, when you can add close to a half million dollars to your profit margin within a week, greed always wins out. Thus, we have become beta testers for Apple's iPhone, and here I thought that this only occurred with Microsoft in the release of its operating systems.

When you hype your product as much as Job's has, one would expect forward stepping to what one is already accustom to, not several steps backward. Besides the lack of a "cut & paste" feature, I have noticed that I do not have the same coverage with my same Cingular account that I previously had with my Treo 650 using Cingular. The antenna on the iPhone is weak, and it drops calls more frequently than I ever encountered with my Treo 650, using the same carrier.

That is why I made the opening statement that the iPhone is more fiction than reality! If you trying to decide on whether the iPhone is for you, WAIT until Apple gets it right. Who knows maybe Job's will wake up to the bad press that is soon to follow this device, or maybe his Asian competitors' will release their product with a "step forward" type of technology.

After reading your commentary or whatever the frack you want to call it I went and returned my iPhone.....are you satisfied?:p:p


*Oh, by the way, enjoy that treo of yours.......
 

ColsTiger

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Mar 8, 2007
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Columbus, GA
Steve Jobs always walks on the dark side of life, and his introduction of the iPhone earlier in the year is just another one of those occasions. (Anyone who has read iWoz will know what I am referring to.)

What will the iPhone not do:

Before I go into the various functions that the iPhone lacks, Steve's Job's (Apple Computer's) official mantra is that iPhone is not a computer to most of one's questions.

1. It does not have the basic "cut and paste" that most PDAs have. The iPhone is actually a regression in that respect. (Mantra, This is not a computer)

2. It will not do streaming video. Mantra; It is not a computer

3. The iPod features will not play back through any blue tooth features, nor will it play back through your car stereo using the normal "monster cable" to select an fm station. Mantra; It is not a computer

4. No arrow keys to maneuver your way on text. All that is offered is a backwards moving delete key, or you can try stabbing the iPhone screen in order to reposition the cursor. Mantra; It is not a computer

5. Blue tooth head set use to work both ways with my Treo 650, with the iPhone, it only works with out going calls not incoming. I have the Plantronics 510. Mantra; It is not a computer

6. The iPhone is mostly a slave unit of the laptop computer. Most of the syncing is one way with the real work being done at the computer end, not at the iPhone end. Example, one can not create a group in the iPhone address book (contacts), it has to be done at the computer end. Mantra; It is not a computer

7. There is no sync with the home computer of the iPhone widget notes. No, it does not sync with sticky notes. It sort of hangs out there in "Job's Limbo land." Mantra; It is not a computer

8. The iPhone will not stand up to a normal daily usage without having to recharge its batteries at least once during the day. At the rate of power usage it consumes, the battery will not last long, in-spite of the Apple's mantra of it lasting longer than anything on the market. It is interesting to note that when the iPhone was released, Apple also released a formal statement where they would charge you $75.00 to replace the iPhone battery, and rent you an iPhone for $29.00. Talk about lack of confidence in your own product. How much of a no brainer would it have been to put a door on the back of your iPhone and have the user change their own battery. Mantra; It is not a computer. (Was Job's serious that he has 250 patents on this device.)

Job's needs to get some serious fixes out to the market place soon, otherwise the Asian market will eat him up when they bring out their "reversed engineered" versions of the iPhone at Christmas time.

When I questioned the Apple rep on the mantra of "it is not a computer" I told him to go back and review Steve Job's "dog and pony show performance" that he presented at the mac convention, and also review his statement that there would be a delay in the release of the Leopard operating system for the laptop and desktop, because the software engineers responsible for that, were working on the release of the iPhone system since the iPhone was to be a mini version of the Mac OS X system. I also asked about the fact that some of the iPhone's operating system's features were only one way, residing mostly in the lap top end. His reply was that they now refer to the operating system of the iPhone as the OS X, they removed the word Mac, before Mac OS X, so that consumers would not be confused. Talk about a snow job. ( or maybe instead of calling it a snow job, one would be correct in calling it a "Steve Job."

My take on this, is that the phone was not ready for prime time, and that it should have been released about a year later. However, when you can add close to a half million dollars to your profit margin within a week, greed always wins out. Thus, we have become beta testers for Apple's iPhone, and here I thought that this only occurred with Microsoft in the release of its operating systems.

When you hype your product as much as Job's has, one would expect forward stepping to what one is already accustom to, not several steps backward. Besides the lack of a "cut & paste" feature, I have noticed that I do not have the same coverage with my same Cingular account that I previously had with my Treo 650 using Cingular. The antenna on the iPhone is weak, and it drops calls more frequently than I ever encountered with my Treo 650, using the same carrier.

That is why I made the opening statement that the iPhone is more fiction than reality! If you trying to decide on whether the iPhone is for you, WAIT until Apple gets it right. Who knows maybe Job's will wake up to the bad press that is soon to follow this device, or maybe his Asian competitors' will release their product with a "step forward" type of technology.
Just another hater.
 

bcaslis

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Seriously, get some therapy! You either have way too much time on your hands, way too much misdirected anger, or something else.

Do you work for Palm? Maybe Microsoft?
 

DRabbit

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Jul 2, 2007
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1. It does not have the basic "cut and paste" that most PDAs have. The iPhone is actually a regression in that respect. (Mantra, This is not a computer)
And what WILL you complain about when this is fixed - and it will be. Have you yourself ever design cut and paste to work on a touch screen? Actually THINK about it and realize it's not as easy as one would think. We will get this soon though, I have no doubts.

2. It will not do streaming video. Mantra; It is not a computer
It doesn't wash my car either.

3. The iPod features will not play back through any blue tooth features, nor will it play back through your car stereo using the normal "monster cable" to select an fm station. Mantra; It is not a computer
I'm not sure what you're talking about with the FM station thing, but it plays back through my car stereo just fine. I also expect we'll have bluetooth file transfer in the future, as soon as they can assure the record companies it will be locked down so people can't transfer music files to one another. I BELIEVE that it will, indeed, playback music through a bluetooth headset and I've read people who've done it (I myself haven't tried though).

4. No arrow keys to maneuver your way on text. All that is offered is a backwards moving delete key, or you can try stabbing the iPhone screen in order to reposition the cursor. Mantra; It is not a computer
Arrow keys are unnecessary when you have the magnifying glass feature. Learn to use it.

5. Blue tooth head set use to work both ways with my Treo 650, with the iPhone, it only works with out going calls not incoming. I have the Plantronics 510. Mantra; It is not a computer
Um... my bluetooth works on both incoming and outgoing, though compatibility issue aren't all that surprising on ANY brand spanking new device though.

6. The iPhone is mostly a slave unit of the laptop computer. Most of the syncing is one way with the real work being done at the computer end, not at the iPhone end. Example, one can not create a group in the iPhone address book (contacts), it has to be done at the computer end. Mantra; It is not a computer

7. There is no sync with the home computer of the iPhone widget notes. No, it does not sync with sticky notes. It sort of hangs out there in "Job's Limbo land." Mantra; It is not a computer
This has already been addressed by articles out there. Notes is going to Sync with it's desktop version when the latest OS X is released, and there will be lots of other features incorporated at the same time.

8. The iPhone will not stand up to a normal daily usage without having to recharge its batteries at least once during the day. At the rate of power usage it consumes, the battery will not last long, in-spite of the Apple's mantra of it lasting longer than anything on the market. It is interesting to note that when the iPhone was released, Apple also released a formal statement where they would charge you $75.00 to replace the iPhone battery, and rent you an iPhone for $29.00. Talk about lack of confidence in your own product. How much of a no brainer would it have been to put a door on the back of your iPhone and have the user change their own battery. Mantra; It is not a computer. (Was Job's serious that he has 250 patents on this device.)
I'm getting fine battery life. I was IMing/TMing like a banshee today, and browsing the web quite a bit, and there were even some phone calls tossed in there. When I stuck it on the charger at midnight it was still about 30-40% charged. Considering it does more than nearly any phone on the market I wouldn't be so quick to compare it in terms of battery life. It certainly goes much further than my laptop battery does. As for user-replaceable batteries... everyone screamed about that with the iPod too, but it didn't have any impact on the millions willing to buy one.

Job's needs to get some serious fixes out to the market place soon, otherwise the Asian market will eat him up when they bring out their "reversed engineered" versions of the iPhone at Christmas time.
You are kidding, right? The Asain market is a whole different ballgame. Their phones do things like pay tolls & train tickets, get used as a creditcard, and they have the worlds fastest wireless network. You'd be hard pressed to impress any Asain market with a device developed primarily for US consumption. Geez, the car I bought here can come equipped with in-car Kareoke over in Japan.

When I questioned the Apple rep on the mantra of "it is not a computer" I told him to go back and review Steve Job's "dog and pony show performance" that he presented at the mac convention, and also review his statement that there would be a delay in the release of the Leopard operating system for the laptop and desktop, because the software engineers responsible for that, were working on the release of the iPhone system since the iPhone was to be a mini version of the Mac OS X system. I also asked about the fact that some of the iPhone's operating system's features were only one way, residing mostly in the lap top end. His reply was that they now refer to the operating system of the iPhone as the OS X, they removed the word Mac, before Mac OS X, so that consumers would not be confused. Talk about a snow job. ( or maybe instead of calling it a snow job, one would be correct in calling it a "Steve Job."
And Apple owes you an answer why? It's pretty simple, if you don't like it, don't buy it.

My take on this, is that the phone was not ready for prime time, and that it should have been released about a year later. However, when you can add close to a half million dollars to your profit margin within a week, greed always wins out. Thus, we have become beta testers for Apple's iPhone, and here I thought that this only occurred with Microsoft in the release of its operating systems.
I don't at all feel like a beta tester. I'm a tech geek and I LOVE my iPhone. I'm using it every day and not just as a toy, and it feels "ready" to me. Honestly, I haven't even missed cut & paste yet. I've comfortable done more with this cellphone in two weeks that I did with any previous over years of use. What the iPhone does, it does extremely well, and what it doesn't do... well guess what? It will do soon enough.

When you hype your product as much as Job's has, one would expect forward stepping to what one is already accustom to, not several steps backward. Besides the lack of a "cut & paste" feature, I have noticed that I do not have the same coverage with my same Cingular account that I previously had with my Treo 650 using Cingular. The antenna on the iPhone is weak, and it drops calls more frequently than I ever encountered with my Treo 650, using the same carrier.
Haven't notice this at all. I'd swear I'm getting BETTER reception than I did with my razr.

That is why I made the opening statement that the iPhone is more fiction than reality! If you trying to decide on whether the iPhone is for you, WAIT until Apple gets it right. Who knows maybe Job's will wake up to the bad press that is soon to follow this device, or maybe his Asian competitors' will release their product with a "step forward" type of technology.
I cannot tell you how happy I am I didn't wait. Bad press soon to follow? I guess you didn't read the USA Today article that said 90% of polled iPhone owners were "extremely" or "very" happy with their purchase... or the one (from another paper that escapes me right now) that said 1 in 3 people WANT one.

I suppose you believe the Zune will overtake the market in portable music player sales too?

While some of what the iPhone is missing may bug you, you miss the whole point that it does a lot of things so much better than any other cellphone. I can impress of room full of IT guys merely by showing them Safari... and that doesn't go into any of the other features. Will there be some additions along the way? Absolutely. But that hardly makes it the instable mess that Vista was on release... or the user-unfriendly nightmare of nearly every other phone on the market.
 

tamakin

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Oric, I love my iPhone. It's the greatest phone I have ever owned. There is no phone out there that can compete with the beautiful display, quickness of applications opening up and safari on a 3 inch screen. I love it!
 

crane98

New Member
Jul 11, 2007
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And what WILL you complain about when this is fixed - and it will be.
Says who? Apple hasn't released any official statement detailing what will and will not be fixed. Opinions are different than facts, learn the difference between the two.