The longest Non Run on sentence

iCafe

New Member
Dec 11, 2007
1,877
0
0
www.wwtdd.com
#1
The longest Sentence (That is not a Run on Sentence)

“Knowing that millions of people around the world would be watching in person and on television and expecting
great things from him — at least one more gold medal for America, if not another world record — during this, his fourth
and surely his last appearance in the World Olympics, and realizing that his legs could no longer carry him down the
runway with the same blazing speed and confidence in making a huge, eye-popping leap that they were capable of a
few years ago when he set world records in the 100-meter dash and in the 400-meter relay and won a silver medal in the
long jump, the renowned sprinter and track-and-field personality Carl Lewis, who had known pressure from fans and
media before but never, even as a professional runner, this kind of pressure, made only a few appearances in races during
the few months before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, partly because he was afraid of raising expectations
even higher and did not want to be distracted by interviews and adoring fans who would follow him into stores and
restaurants demanding autographs and photo-opportunities, but mostly because he wanted to conserve his energies and
concentrate, like a martial arts expert, on the job at hand: winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing
home another Gold Medal for the United States, the most fitting conclusion to his brilliant career in track and field.”
 

styfle

Zealot
Gold
Mar 31, 2008
3,381
7
38
#4
Who says its not a run-on sentence? lol
 

iCafe

New Member
Dec 11, 2007
1,877
0
0
www.wwtdd.com
#8
Right he is claiming that it is not a run-on sentence. According to who? lol
I read it a couple times and it seems like a run-on to me.
3. A RUN-ON SENTENCE (sometimes called a "fused sentence") has at least two parts, EACH of which can stand by
itself (in other words, two independent clauses), but the two parts have been smooshed together instead of being
properly connected. The length of a sentence really has nothing to do with whether a sentence is a run-on or not; being a
run-on is a structural flaw that can plague even a very short sentence:
EXAMPLE: The sun is high, put on some sun block.
An extremely long sentence, on the other hand, might be a "run-off-at-the-mouth" sentence, but it can be otherwise
sound, structurally.
EXAMPLE: Here's a sample of a good 239-word sentence. It's not the kind of sentence you'd want to read very
often, but it does work. Remember, this is not a run-on sentence. ONLY the underlined part acts as an independent
clause; the rest stand as prepositional phrases, participial phrases, or subordinating clauses.
“Knowing that millions of people around the world would be watching in person and on television and expecting
great things from him — at least one more gold medal for America, if not another world record — during this, his fourth
and surely his last appearance in the World Olympics, and realizing that his legs could no longer carry him down the
runway with the same blazing speed and confidence in making a huge, eye-popping leap that they were capable of a
few years ago when he set world records in the 100-meter dash and in the 400-meter relay and won a silver medal in the
long jump, the renowned sprinter and track-and-field personality Carl Lewis, who had known pressure from fans and
media before but never, even as a professional runner, this kind of pressure, made only a few appearances in races during
the few months before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, partly because he was afraid of raising expectations
even higher and did not want to be distracted by interviews and adoring fans who would follow him into stores and
restaurants demanding autographs and photo-opportunities, but mostly because he wanted to conserve his energies and
concentrate, like a martial arts expert, on the job at hand: winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing
 

iCafe

New Member
Dec 11, 2007
1,877
0
0
www.wwtdd.com
#9
When two independent clauses are connected by only a comma, they constitute a run-on sentence that is called a commasplice.
The example just above (about the sunscreen) is a comma-splice. When you use a comma to connect two
independent clauses, it must be accompanied by a little conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so).
EXAMPLE: The sun is high, so put on some sunscreen.
Run-on sentences happen typically under the following circumstances*:
a . When an independent clause gives an order or directive based on what was said in the prior independent clause:
This next chapter has a lot of difficult information in it, you should start studying right away.(We could put a period
where that comma is and start a new sentence. A semicolon might also work there.)
b. When two independent clauses are connected by a transitional expression (conjunctive adverb) such as however,
moreover, nevertheless.
Mr. Nguyen has sent his four children to ivy-league colleges, however, he has sacrificed his health working day and
night in that dusty bakery.(Again, where that first comma appears, we could have used either a period — and started
a new sentence — or a semicolon.)
c. When the second of two independent clauses contains a pronoun that connects it to the first independent clause.
This computer doesn't make sense to me, it came without a manual. (Although these two clauses are quite brief, and the
ideas are closely related, this is a run-on sentence. We need a period or a semicolon where that comma now stands.)
Most of those computers in the Learning Assistance Center are broken already, this proves my point about American
computer manufacturers. Again, two nicely related clauses, incorrectly connected — a run-on. Use a period or semicolon
to cure this sentence.
The above are all names given to compound sentences that are not punctuated correctly. The best way to avoid such
errors is to punctuate compound sentences correctly by using one or the other of these rules.
1. Join the two independent clauses with one of the coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet), and use a
comma before the connecting word.
_________________________, and _________________________.
(He enjoys walking through the country, and he often goes backpacking on his vacations.)
2. When you do not have a connecting word (or when you use a connecting word other than and, but, for, or nor, so, or yet
between the two independent clauses) use a semicolon (;).
__________________________;_____________________________.
(He often watched TV when there were only reruns; she preferred to read instead.)
or
__________________________; however,____________________.
(He often watched TV when there were only reruns; however, she preferred to read instead.)
So, run-ons and fused sentences are terms describing two independent clauses which are joined together with no
connecting word or punctuation to separate the clauses.
Incorrect: They weren't dangerous criminals they were detectives in disguise.
Correct: They weren't dangerous criminals; they were detectives in disguise.
Incorrect: I didn't know which job I wanted I was too confused to decide.
Correct: I didn't know which job I wanted because I was too confused to decide.
 

styfle

Zealot
Gold
Mar 31, 2008
3,381
7
38
#10
Why is the spacing all weird? Did you get that in an email or what?