They Shoulda Called It A PocketMac! Grrrr!

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crob80227

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Apr 14, 2007
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#1
As soon as they announced the push back for Leopard because of the iPhone -- already the Microsoft lemmings started clucking their tongues and saying, "Who in their right mind would pay $500 for just a cell phone?"

I think very few Non-Mac owners actually saw the Keynote Steve gave on the iPhone and believe it's just a cell phone that has iTunes on it.

I looked up PocketPC's and the HP IPAQ PocketPC costs $500! And it doesn't do half the s**t the iPhone can do.

People spending $500 (plus!) on an HP iPAQ are as dumb as people spending $1,000 for an old Commodore 64 who then laugh at people paying $999 on a 2007 MacBook.

If people just think it's a cell phone that plays MP3's -- will they buy it?

Did Apple make a huge mistake with the name?
 

robhon

New Member
Silver
Mar 17, 2007
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#3
Apple most decidedly did NOT make a mistake with the name. It was a very shrewd strategic marketing decision.

Think of it this way. You are Apple. You make the most successful digital music player and command nearly 75% of a very lucrative market. All the competition combined doesn't look like it's going to cause much of a problem. What do you do? Do you sit and smirk and count the money? No. You look at where your position is most vulnerable. Apple has long understood that cell phones, not other digital media players, are both the greatest potential for competition and also the greatest potential for continuing growth. THAT is why Apple HAD to call this product the iPhone. They didn't even own the name! Still the name was so important to what they HAD to do, that they used it anyway and dealt with the consequences later.

From a purely strategic standpoint the iPhone could never have been called anything other than the iPhone.
 

DiGiTY

New Member
Apr 15, 2007
6
0
0
#4
I looked up PocketPC's and the HP IPAQ PocketPC costs $500! And it doesn't do half the s**t the iPhone can do.

People spending $500 (plus!) on an HP iPAQ are as dumb as people spending $1,000 for an old Commodore 64 who then laugh at people paying $999 on a 2007 MacBook.
An HP iPAQ/Windows Mobile device serves a different purpose and a different user than an iPhone will. Windows Mobile devices allows the businesss/office/serious user to conduct a considerable amount of work and be productive away from the office which is obviously very important and mission critical in our society. That $500+ investment is going to more than payoff for that user and company.

But nah, da iPhone ain't down wit that ish yo! I'mma be checkin my Yahoo! email, google map'n dem hoes in iceland while bumpin 50's new mixtape and takin pictures of my soldier (because my joint still growin' son!)...... then i've gotta text Becky, because she's my BFF and tell her - like oh my gawd!, about how Matt booted on my Pucci bag last night at Jen's party and how she was being such a betch to me because i didn't approve her friend request on MySpace and i told that ignorant slut i tried to but my iPhone don't do Flash so i couldn't even load her ugly fugly profil... hold on... my icons and stuff keep crashing on me and the battery is dead again... lemme call you from a pay phone


The iPhone does nothing that important that it requires a $500 or $600 price tag. No Pocket iWork, Pocket Office, Pocket Entourage... the stuff of value, the stuff that cost you money. Just mini iTunes, mini Safari, mini Google Maps, mini Yahoo!... all this stuff is free software, free content free technology, why are you willing to pay $500 for free leisure, non-productive software! You can get this stuff on Windows Mobile and even regular mobile phones... free!


wow, i'm not even a microsoft guy, i'm a born again Apple head... iPhone still isn't worth $500... it's just a Sidekick, but for AT&T
 

wot_fan

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Mar 7, 2007
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#5
An HP iPAQ/Windows Mobile device serves a different purpose and a different user than an iPhone will. Windows Mobile devices allows the businesss/office/serious user to conduct a considerable amount of work and be productive away from the office which is obviously very important and mission critical in our society. That $500+ investment is going to more than payoff for that user and company.

But nah, da iPhone ain't down wit that ish yo! I'mma be checkin my Yahoo! email, google map'n dem hoes in iceland while bumpin 50's new mixtape and takin pictures of my soldier (because my joint still growin' son!)...... then i've gotta text Becky, because she's my BFF and tell her - like oh my gawd!, about how Matt booted on my Pucci bag last night at Jen's party and how she was being such a betch to me because i didn't approve her friend request on MySpace and i told that ignorant slut i tried to but my iPhone don't do Flash so i couldn't even load her ugly fugly profil... hold on... my icons and stuff keep crashing on me and the battery is dead again... lemme call you from a pay phone


The iPhone does nothing that important that it requires a $500 or $600 price tag. No Pocket iWork, Pocket Office, Pocket Entourage... the stuff of value, the stuff that cost you money. Just mini iTunes, mini Safari, mini Google Maps, mini Yahoo!... all this stuff is free software, free content free technology, why are you willing to pay $500 for free leisure, non-productive software! You can get this stuff on Windows Mobile and even regular mobile phones... free!


wow, i'm not even a microsoft guy, i'm a born again Apple head... iPhone still isn't worth $500... it's just a Sidekick, but for AT&T
I am curious, have you ever used a WM based phone? The pocket versions of the Office apps are a joke. For example, when I edited a file on my WM5 that I created on my PC, I was stunned to find out that all the advanced formatting applied when it was created was stripped off by the pocket version. IMHO, at best the pocket versions are viewers.

As far as your comments about what will be included with the iPhone, at this point they are just assumptions with no bases in fact. Apple has announced some, but not all of the applications that will be installed. Until it comes out we will not know for sure what it may be lacking.

Now as far as the software on the iPhone being "mini" versions, what are you basing that on? Steve Jobs called the applications "desktop class" since they will be running on OS X. After watching the demo for iPhone's Safari and comparing it to the version of IE installed on a PPC there is little doubt which one is "mini". If you want to apply "mini" to something, Windows Mobile has plenty of places and you can start with the OS itself.

As for you comment about how much software MS includes for free, all I can do is chuckle. Soon after I bought my WM5 based phone, I found that I had to purchase literally hundreds of dollars of 3rd party apps to make the core functions usable. For example, the included PIM software is basically useless. The number of Today screen plugs shows how much work it needs. After loading a couple of hundred contacts, try finding one using the included contact software in a reasonable amount of time. Believe me I could go on and on. The UI on the iPhone appears to work well enough that it will not have to be supplemented by 3rd part apps.

Let end my rant by saying I am have been using a WM based phone and I am counting the days until the iPhone comes out. If it works as well as I expect it to, I will consider the $600 well spent.
 

itsabouttime

Member
Silver
Feb 18, 2007
654
0
16
San Antonio, Tx.
#6
An HP iPAQ/Windows Mobile device serves a different purpose and a different user than an iPhone will. Windows Mobile devices allows the businesss/office/serious user to conduct a considerable amount of work and be productive away from the office which is obviously very important and mission critical in our society. That $500+ investment is going to more than payoff for that user and company.

But nah, da iPhone ain't down wit that ish yo! I'mma be checkin my Yahoo! email, google map'n dem hoes in iceland while bumpin 50's new mixtape and takin pictures of my soldier (because my joint still growin' son!)...... then i've gotta text Becky, because she's my BFF and tell her - like oh my gawd!, about how Matt booted on my Pucci bag last night at Jen's party and how she was being such a betch to me because i didn't approve her friend request on MySpace and i told that ignorant slut i tried to but my iPhone don't do Flash so i couldn't even load her ugly fugly profil... hold on... my icons and stuff keep crashing on me and the battery is dead again... lemme call you from a pay phone


The iPhone does nothing that important that it requires a $500 or $600 price tag. No Pocket iWork, Pocket Office, Pocket Entourage... the stuff of value, the stuff that cost you money. Just mini iTunes, mini Safari, mini Google Maps, mini Yahoo!... all this stuff is free software, free content free technology, why are you willing to pay $500 for free leisure, non-productive software! You can get this stuff on Windows Mobile and even regular mobile phones... free!


wow, i'm not even a microsoft guy, i'm a born again Apple head... iPhone still isn't worth $500... it's just a Sidekick, but for AT&T

Oh geeze, here comes the bashers! When it rains it pours huh guys? :mad:
 

chris

Administrator
Administrator
Jun 10, 2006
11,810
1,775
113
Long Island, NY
#8
As soon as they announced the push back for Leopard because of the iPhone -- already the Microsoft lemmings started clucking their tongues and saying, "Who in their right mind would pay $500 for just a cell phone?"

I think very few Non-Mac owners actually saw the Keynote Steve gave on the iPhone and believe it's just a cell phone that has iTunes on it.

I looked up PocketPC's and the HP IPAQ PocketPC costs $500! And it doesn't do half the s**t the iPhone can do.

People spending $500 (plus!) on an HP iPAQ are as dumb as people spending $1,000 for an old Commodore 64 who then laugh at people paying $999 on a 2007 MacBook.

If people just think it's a cell phone that plays MP3's -- will they buy it?

Did Apple make a huge mistake with the name?
If it were purely an iPod and a phone, I still think it would be a huge hit. In my opinion, those who use smartphones have already experienced the beauty of convergence. Trading in my Handspring Visor and StarTec for a Treo 180 was nirvana. For me, it was PDA and phone. For most folks today, they carry an iPod and phone. Simply converging the two will be a reason to move to an iPhone. All the "bonus" features that come with a smartphone (and yes, I consider the iPhone to be a smartphone) will be an eye-opening experience. For me, the winning app on my smartphones is email. I own both a Moto Q and a Treo. On both, email is the main app for me.

As for the price, the iPod Photo came out around $400. Surely, the iPhone is worth $100 more. It would have been nice if the iPhone came unlocked. That would have made it a sure-fire hit, but would have been a nightmare to support.

BTW, calling it just a phone with iTunes is not reserved for just regular mac bashers. Executives at many well known smartphone manufacturers have also called it nothing more than a widescreen ipod. (See article Palm Executives Calling Out iPhone)

-Chris
 
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dblaron

New Member
Bronze
Feb 17, 2007
58
0
0
#9
ok, so we have all read the new article posted about the leoperd software engineers pulled to work on the iPhone. Well this is going to be a good thing. This means that Apple is listening to the consumers and changing things up. Ask youself this, why would Apple pull some of the best software engineers in the businesss to work on a phone? Well I think because they are planning on changing things with it. Put it this way. The phone was already pretty much operational. So this could only mean one thing. They changed some of the hardware aspects and now they need to get the OS updated and functioning right. Yet this is just my observation. What does everyone else think? I hope that it was 3G?
 

phone19

New Member
Apr 1, 2007
17
0
0
#10
iPhone making the 500$ worth it..

For right now, I believe many think that it is just a phone with i tunes. But eventually, as mentioned here in these posts, it will build up its capabilities. I believe Apple will promote the specifics way closer to the release date. People tend to have short memories and short attention spans. So, in June I think there will be tons of ads, promos, etc. which will describe and specify the iPhone details and capabilities.

I can't wait for June!:mad:
 

wjp09

Zealot
Gold
Feb 25, 2007
2,559
25
48
NJ
#11
I needs to be iPhone. I believe that people can trust the "I". Maybe some inexperienced people wouldn't but it if it were called Pocket Mac. They may not know what a mac is.
 

jswan

New Member
Mar 20, 2007
19
0
0
#12
I needs to be iPhone. I believe that people can trust the "I". Maybe some inexperienced people wouldn't but it if it were called Pocket Mac. They may not know what a mac is.
Or they might not like macs. The coolest thing about iPods is that only the most die-hard of mac-haters even pretend to dislike them.
 

DiGiTY

New Member
Apr 15, 2007
6
0
0
#13
I am curious, have you ever used a WM based phone? The pocket versions of the Office apps are a joke. For example, when I edited a file on my WM5 that I created on my PC, I was stunned to find out that all the advanced formatting applied when it was created was stripped off by the pocket version. IMHO, at best the pocket versions are viewers.

As far as your comments about what will be included with the iPhone, at this point they are just assumptions with no bases in fact. Apple has announced some, but not all of the applications that will be installed. Until it comes out we will not know for sure what it may be lacking.

Now as far as the software on the iPhone being "mini" versions, what are you basing that on? Steve Jobs called the applications "desktop class" since they will be running on OS X. After watching the demo for iPhone's Safari and comparing it to the version of IE installed on a PPC there is little doubt which one is "mini". If you want to apply "mini" to something, Windows Mobile has plenty of places and you can start with the OS itself.

As for you comment about how much software MS includes for free, all I can do is chuckle. Soon after I bought my WM5 based phone, I found that I had to purchase literally hundreds of dollars of 3rd party apps to make the core functions usable. For example, the included PIM software is basically useless. The number of Today screen plugs shows how much work it needs. After loading a couple of hundred contacts, try finding one using the included contact software in a reasonable amount of time. Believe me I could go on and on. The UI on the iPhone appears to work well enough that it will not have to be supplemented by 3rd part apps.

Let end my rant by saying I am have been using a WM based phone and I am counting the days until the iPhone comes out. If it works as well as I expect it to, I will consider the $600 well spent.

You are not listening and you're missing the point. An HP iPAQ/Windows Mobile device serves a different purpose and a different user than an iPhone will. Also, you don't seem to realize you are not really the targeted audience for a WM device nor an iPhone. From your experience it sounds like you really want a laptop or UMPC and you didn't really do your research regarding the Pocket Office features and capabilities before buying a WM device. Human error. Then to make it worst you installed all those 3rd party programs to get it to look and perform like you want it to. No matter how much you trick out ya Civic, it's still a Civic. Next time get the TSX.

I'm not a fan of WM technology nor its Pocket Office myself. I also want more from a mobile computing platform, but I do know the reality of their limitations and I know that's something I have to be content with to some degree. You should do the same or you're going be disappointed with the iPhone as you are with your WM phone.
 

wot_fan

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Mar 7, 2007
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#14
You are not listening and you're missing the point. An HP iPAQ/Windows Mobile device serves a different purpose and a different user than an iPhone will. Also, you don't seem to realize you are not really the targeted audience for a WM device nor an iPhone. From your experience it sounds like you really want a laptop or UMPC and you didn't really do your research regarding the Pocket Office features and capabilities before buying a WM device. Human error. Then to make it worst you installed all those 3rd party programs to get it to look and perform like you want it to. No matter how much you trick out ya Civic, it's still a Civic. Next time get the TSX.

I'm not a fan of WM technology nor its Pocket Office myself. I also want more from a mobile computing platform, but I do know the reality of their limitations and I know that's something I have to be content with to some degree. You should do the same or you're going be disappointed with the iPhone as you are with your WM phone.
Correct me I am wrong, but you stated that WM mobile devices let you do "a considerable amount of work and be productive away from the office." You went on to say that the software included with the iPhone was "mini." In post I pointed out that the Pocket Office software was extremely limited. I also brought up the fact that the iPhone is powered by OS X which will allow more robust software (read not "mini").

Now you say that I was attempting to use the pocket software beyond its capabilities and that a laptop is required. Is fixing a typo in a word doc really beyond Pocket Words capability? The answer is yes if you don't want the formating to be removed. How then is Pocket office helping me to be productive? Do you consider being able to view office documents being productive? I would not be surprised at all if the iPhone included that feature as well as the ability to edit the files. If it does, what different purpose does a WM based phone serve that the iPhone doesn't?

As far as the 3rd party apps I installed on my WM5, please re-read my post. I didn't add them to get laptop like functionality. I added them to get the features that were supposedly included in the phones OS like PIM to work in an acceptable manner. When I then added apps to customize it (again supposedly a feature of WM5 based phone) the device became unstable. I then learned that a lot of apps don't play well together. The end result was that I removed all 3rd party apps except those that made the phone usable. So much for the usefulness of 3rd party apps on a WM5 phone.

Finally, I am fully aware that every device has its limitations. Despite what you think, I do a considerable amount of research before I make a purchase. The problem I had was with my WM5 device is that it didn't deliver on its promises. Shame on me for trusting that the published specs were accurate and for being an early adopter. Believe me, I won't make that mistake again when it comes to MS based device. It remains to be seen if the iPhone will live up to its specs, but I have confidence that it will.
 

Dre180

Member
Bronze
Apr 16, 2007
50
4
8
New York (Soon to be Chicago)
#15
Correct me I am wrong, but you stated that WM mobile devices let you do "a considerable amount of work and be productive away from the office." You went on to say that the software included with the iPhone was "mini." In post I pointed out that the Pocket Office software was extremely limited. I also brought up the fact that the iPhone is powered by OS X which will allow more robust software (read not "mini").

Now you say that I was attempting to use the pocket software beyond its capabilities and that a laptop is required. Is fixing a typo in a word doc really beyond Pocket Words capability? The answer is yes if you don't want the formating to be removed. How then is Pocket office helping me to be productive? Do you consider being able to view office documents being productive? I would not be surprised at all if the iPhone included that feature as well as the ability to edit the files. If it does, what different purpose does a WM based phone serve that the iPhone doesn't?

As far as the 3rd party apps I installed on my WM5, please re-read my post. I didn't add them to get laptop like functionality. I added them to get the features that were supposedly included in the phones OS like PIM to work in an acceptable manner. When I then added apps to customize it (again supposedly a feature of WM5 based phone) the device became unstable. I then learned that a lot of apps don't play well together. The end result was that I removed all 3rd party apps except those that made the phone usable. So much for the usefulness of 3rd party apps on a WM5 phone.

Finally, I am fully aware that every device has its limitations. Despite what you think, I do a considerable amount of research before I make a purchase. The problem I had was with my WM5 device is that it didn't deliver on its promises. Shame on me for trusting that the published specs were accurate and for being an early adopter. Believe me, I won't make that mistake again when it comes to MS based device. It remains to be seen if the iPhone will live up to its specs, but I have confidence that it will.
the iPhone will have it's share of flaws undoubtedly, however there is NO doubt in my mind that it will be much more stable than a wm phone, or any other os that is currently being used on any cellphone. sure, you can say that's all speculation to this point, but i am pretty confident the iPhone like a mac, will be a very refined and stable product.
 

Kabeyun

Member
Silver
Jan 10, 2007
665
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16
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#16
To comment on this civil discourse, I must say that there is a building feeling (admittedly early) that iPhone is not an enterprise solution the way RIM, WM or even Palm devices are. It's a device targeted to the consumer. In this regard, DiGiTY is right. This can and will change with the addition of just a couple of important software capabilities, particularly database and document management. Right now, it's primarily the hardware that's got everying excited. Well, almost everyone, right DiGiTY?

It's also true that WM is kludge and, imo, far underdelivers in reliability and overall usability. Also, if you do want enterprise-level functionality, you've got to buy software and essentially spend the difference between the prices of the two devices in question. In this regard wot_fan is right.

In the end, we each must to assign value in our own way. If someone were perfectly happy with a candy bar phone, separate video iPod, and home computer for e-mail, the iPhone would be worth $0 to that person. If someone were to hang you upside down by your privates unless you had an iPhone in your hand, it'd be worth a fortune. :)

Peace be with you my brothers.

-K
 
Last edited by a moderator:

wot_fan

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Mar 7, 2007
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#17
I agree with your comments Kabeyun.

I disagreed with some of the comments that were made regarding WM superiority when compared to the iPhone. I attempted to express my opinion in a non-offensive way. If I stepped over the line in some way I apologize as that was not my intention. One of the reasons I like EI so much is the civil discussions regarding the pro and cons of the iPhone. I would hate to think that I was in any way responsible for change that.

Peace :).
 

wot_fan

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#19
Aw shucks, don't take it so hard, man. I was just trying to summarize. You both make good and passionate points. :)

Cheers,

-K
Sorry if I misunderstood. I thought you were telling us to calm down.

You are right that I am passionate about this particular topic. That is why I wasn't sure if I kept my emotions in check ;).