Those who have had their 3G warranty replaced by Apple...

Jun 16, 2008
1,177
12
38
Tinley Park, IL
#1
just check your AT&T bill when it comes. I got charged an "upgrade" fee of 18 bucks every time I had my phone replaced (twice thus far). AT&T took the charges off and I'm sure its been brought up before, but I figured it should be thrown out here again so AT&T isn't stealing other people's money too.

The AT&T guy "claims" that when one gets a phone replace in an AT&T store under warranty (not necessarily the iPhone), the AT&T sales assoc voids that charge right away when they activate the new one, but the Apple store cannot do that, so we get charged.... First, I don't believe it, and second, if its true, then why the HELL doesn't AT&T do something about it?
 
Jul 16, 2008
1,592
1
38
Colorado
#2
That's interesting. I had my 3G replaced the first week I got it and only one $18 upgrade or activation fee was charged. I'm going to keep an eye on it now but it really should have appeared on my first statement since it was all in the same billing cycle.
 
Jun 16, 2008
1,177
12
38
Tinley Park, IL
#3
you would think. But, I've never had much enduring luck with AT&T. I actually left them, Cingular at the time, for another company because of the issues I was having. I came back a few years ago for rollover minutes, but had to deal with these little issues again.
 

ravman

Zealot
Gold
Oct 4, 2007
1,197
0
36
Mean Streets of LA.
#4
It's a pain, but I've always found AT&T very good, when it comes to taking off erroneous charges on your bill.

I had a friend who was calling his wife overseas like every second of the day using those 1-800 calling cards. His bill came in and it was like $750 ish. He called AT&T and literally cried down the phone. They eventually knocked his bill down to like $250 ish.

I personally don't see why AT&T should be charging $18 for an upgrade fee anyway. I guess they define it as admin charges or something. It's still a rip off though!
 
Jul 16, 2008
1,592
1
38
Colorado
#6
Are you kidding? They even charge for texting, and that's just wrong! :mad:
Do other carriers actually give you free text messaging? I've been with AT&T long before the switch to Cingular and am not aware of other carriers package deals. I'd bet if they give you free SMS you're probably paying for it elsewhere.
 

kisstine

Zealot
Gold
Jul 12, 2007
1,332
1
38
50
Northern California
#8
It's a pain, but I've always found AT&T very good, when it comes to taking off erroneous charges on your bill.
I've always found this to be the case as well. It is kind of a pain in the butt, but worth it to have the charges corrected. The thing that irks me about it is that they are making a TON of money on erroneous charges that people don't call to complain about. My daughter does not have a data plan on her phone, but has a button that cannot be changed from its default setting to connect to the internet. Every month we have a small charge (usually less than a dollar - when it's more than that, I call, but my time is worth SOMETHING) for times she accidentally hits the button. I've been around and around with them over this and there just doesn't seem to be any way around it.

I personally don't see why AT&T should be charging $18 for an upgrade fee anyway. I guess they define it as admin charges or something. It's still a rip off though!
I was not charged the upgrade fee when I switched from the v1 to the 3G. Nor did I trigger the charge when I had my 3G replaced at the Apple store. (I originally bought at AT&T.) Just lucky?

Thanks for the heads-up, gotza. I'm about to attempt another replacement for weird scratches under the screen that seem to be getting larger, so I'll definitely keep my eye open for extra charges on my bill.
 

rmfnla

Member
Bronze
#10
... and there should be unlimited calling minutes, unlimited internet - all for FREE dammit! :laugh2:

Well, no.

Texting utilizes about 10% of the network resources that a call requires so one would think that the carriers would prefer customers to text rather than call.

However, since texting has been so embraced by younger consumers, it has been marketed as a premium service to take advantage of the Starbucks generation's inability to discerne actual value versus the fad of the moment.