Thoughts on keeping iPhone closed to third-party apps.

Limatoones

New Member
Jan 30, 2007
24
0
0
Philly, PA
#1
I read a lot of "news" about the iPhone and what people are saying about it. The most complaining I've heard is about the 3G thing (which I don't give a rats butt about), the fact that Cingular will be it's only carrier (yes, people, it's still true), and the fact that you can't put third-party apps on it.

I, for one, sighed a HUGE sigh of relief when I heard that.

So you can't put your little foo-foo game on your cell phone? Who cares! At least you will have cell phone that works beautifully with any applications that are created (by Apple) for it.

I know, from first hand experience, what it's like to download an application that I THOUGHT was safe, fun, and secure, only to have it completely ruin my computer and there was really NO undoing it.

It has taught me a valuable lesson. If it isn't sanctioned by the manufacturer, DON'T download it, as it may cause some serious problems.

In the PC world (because Windows and the hardware it runs off of is SO open to third-party apps) there is no possible way they could put their stamp of approval on HALF of the GOOD apps, much less condemn one-tenth of the bad stuff.

It's not a risk I'm willing to take and the same goes for the iPhone. I want my phone (when I DO get one) to work as well in two years as it did the day I bought it and not have to go around kicking myself in the butt for downloading that STUPID third-party game that I thought would be cool only to have it ruin my phone and my experience with it.

And let's not forget that when you download faulty third-party software, the original manufacturer (Apple in this case) is NOT held responsible for any issues it might cause with your device. In short, you are up poop creek without a paddle.

Read an excerpt from an article I found on the matter (The iPhone: Steve Ballmer is Laughing, But…)

"[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica][SIZE=-1]The third party applications issue is interesting. On the one hand, sure, we all want more toys for our gadgets. However, this is not a requirement, as the iPod shows. Still, people are used to third party applications on smartphones, so what's up with Apple not actively embracing this?

[/SIZE][/FONT] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica][SIZE=-1]In my "real" job, I support Treos and Windows Mobile phones, and I will state, without doubt or hesitation, that just as poorly written third party software can cause problems for your Mac or Wintel box, it will cause a phone to have problems as well – to the point where it cannot function as a phone. Endless reset cycles, consumption of resources, etc.[/SIZE][/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica][SIZE=-1]I have phones that I have to reboot a couple of times a day due to third party software issues. So Apple wanting to avoid that is a good thing. It would really suck to find out your phone is now a brick when you need it to get a tow out of a snowstorm."

Thank you, Thank You, THANK YOU, Steve Jobs for keeping the iPhone out of the hands of third-party app makers.
[/SIZE][/FONT]
 

Kabeyun

Member
Silver
Jan 10, 2007
665
0
16
Northeast US
#3
I disagree. If the iPhone is going to be a true productivity device, or if Apple wants a prayer at selling to the businesss market, the iPhone will have to run additional apps. We're not necessarily talking about games. We're talking about MSOffice compatibility, PDF readers, contact management apps, secure storage apps, and databases. These apps will be best developed by 3rd party entities.

Recent stories have emerged indicating that the iPhone platform will not be as restricted as originally thought. The compromise solution to the Limatoones' stability argument, and it's a good point, will probably be an Apple requirement that Apple certify the app as being "iPhone ready," perhaps even marketing it directly through the iTunes store or other download service.

But I for one will have difficulty switching over to the iPhone if my current Treo's data can't effectively be transferred and, preferrably, synchronized.

-K
 
Jan 30, 2007
24
0
0
Philly, PA
#4
I disagree. If the iPhone is going to be a true productivity device, or if Apple wants a prayer at selling to the businesss market, the iPhone will have to run additional apps. We're not necessarily talking about games. We're talking about MSOffice compatibility, PDF readers, contact management apps, secure storage apps, and databases. These apps will be best developed by 3rd party entities.

Recent stories have emerged indicating that the iPhone platform will not be as restricted as originally thought. The compromise solution to the Limatoones' stability argument, and it's a good point, will probably be an Apple requirement that Apple certify the app as being "iPhone ready," perhaps even marketing it directly through the iTunes store or other download service.

But I for one will have difficulty switching over to the iPhone if my current Treo's data can't effectively be transferred and, preferrably, synchronized.

-K
I'd be okay with third-party apps if they were administered through Apple (as you've mentioned through iTunes or something similar) because that means Apple has put their stamp of approval on the app. EA games is already in negotiations with Apple about making games for the iPhone, but the key there is that EA is working WITH Apple, not around them.
My fear stems more from exprience with COMPLETELY open systems, such as going to any old website, finding something you like, typing in your phone number and the app is sent to your phone (after paying of course).

I'm not so much worried about myself. I wouldn't do that, but my husband, on the other hand, has a reputation for downloading things he has NO idea what they do and going, "oops" after they royally mess something up. I don't want to forget my phone one day and come home to him standing there with a guilty look on his face and his welcoming sentence starting out with, "Honey, I'm sorry, but I didn't know..." lol It's never pretty.

However, isn't the iPhone already supporting PDF?
 

Kabeyun

Member
Silver
Jan 10, 2007
665
0
16
Northeast US
#5
However, isn't the iPhone already supporting PDF?
Could be, but I don't recall reading anything specific on that. Pls post a ref if you have one; I'd love to have confirmation.

It's likely that the iPhone will end up supporting PDFs given the Mac OS's stroong PDF integration. From the onboard apps we've seen, Mail may be able to display them, Safari may load them inline, or the Text app may support them.

-K
 

Kabeyun

Member
Silver
Jan 10, 2007
665
0
16
Northeast US
#7
Good deal. I wonder what app opens them. If no new ones appear prior to release, I guess it'll be Text.

-K
 

integrity

New Member
Mar 13, 2007
10
0
0
#8
I like that Apple is working WITH other developers currently. In the future when there are more iPhone users, developers may need less strictness from Apple for the businesss users as Kabeyun eluded to. But I like how it's really only Apple's work in the iPhone right now.
 

Bender

Member
Bronze
Feb 21, 2007
80
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6
Virginia
#9
I think you are missing the point. The iPhone is more of and entertainment device not a tool for the office. :cool:
 

TrippalHealicks

New Member
Gold
Mar 2, 2007
1,341
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0
#10
I think you are missing the point. The iPhone is more of and entertainment device not a tool for the office. :cool:

This is true. The iPhone was never meant to appeal to a "businesss" or "corporate" crowd. Nor do I think it ever will be. Just like MAC compared to PCs. You couldn't fill a businesss that require a lot of different 3rd party apps, with MACs. The software support and diversity just isn't there. MACs are wonderful computers, don't get me wrong, but they're not made for businesss. Nor will the iPhone.