Ugh O! I'm beginning to be outnumbered!

efuseakay

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Nov 11, 2008
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#61
The s4 might have a bigger better looking screen and supposedly faster hardware, but to me, it feels like a cheap phone. I'm thinking about trying an htc one or Sony Xperia Z. I really like the waterproof aspect of the Sony. But on the other hand I kinda want to wait and see what the next iteration of iPhone is. I'm hoping Apple pulls their heads out their butts and builds something to wow us and blow these Androids out of the water. That's what I'm HOPING for. I doubt it will happen and if it doesn't, I'm moving on to something different. I mainly want a bigger screen. We were talking at work today and finally decided why Apple really called the retina display...the retina display. It's because the screen is so small that you must place your retina so close to the screen to be able to see anything lol!


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The 5S or whatever they end up calling it, won't be a huge upgrade. A whole new redesign will most likely be late next year.
 

Mthoroughbred

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Dec 16, 2008
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#62
Yet Samsung is following Apple's footsteps as seen with the Galaxy S4 and S3. The Samsung Galaxy S4 is a redefined version of the S3 not a radical design. It's more of making the experience as gimmicky as it may seem to some better.


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acosmichippo

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#63
Wow. I thought that was a thing of the past now that Samsungs have quad-cores. It's interesting how Apple nailed making it as smooth as butter back with single-cores of '07 on the iPhone 2G. There is something to be said for software-hardware integration.
This article explains it pretty well. It's due to a fundamental difference in the way UI is prioritized by the OS. Incidentally, Windows Phone 7/8 takes a similar approach to iOS, so it shouldn't have the lag either.

http://www.imore.com/android-ui-smooth-ios
 

imutter

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#64
Ok I had to test this out
I took both phones killed all apps used same site
I did have eye scroll turned on for the Samsung ( did not use it)
Safari and what ever Samsung call their Internet ( not chrome)
Now I am thinking I got a lemon iPhone 5
 

acosmichippo

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#65
My guess is the lag in Android will present itself more when there is multitasking going on. Since you killed all other apps, the UI was probably able to function smoothly without getting CPU cycles taken over by other things.
 

Ltzguy

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Jun 22, 2010
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#66
Ok I had to test this out
I took both phones killed all apps used same site
I did have eye scroll turned on for the Samsung ( did not use it)
Safari and what ever Samsung call their Internet ( not chrome)
Now I am thinking I got a lemon iPhone 5
Mine keeps going (my ip5) like the s4 in the video. The lag I was talking about is when scrolling a little slower and between pages. The s4 doesn't move or react as fast as your finger. The ip5 keeps up much better.


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dkhmwilliams

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#67
They had one. It was made by htc. Forgot the name if it as there is so many


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It was the Incredible LTE. But it was under spec'd. I was talking more of a flagship device that was around 4 inches. I haven't seen one of those lately.


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iP5

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#68
Absolutely, any lag on a top tier Android is the multitasking getting hit, likely by the OEM bloatware. Even without changing ROMs the first thing I'd do is disable apps that are of zero value.
Yes, iOS seems to dedicate 50-90% of its resources to the active app to achieve smoothness. That said I find toggling things such as Bluetooth or Wi-Fi very choppy on iOS. What's the deal with that?

Sent from my Nexus 4
 

Europa

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#69
Absolutely, any lag on a top tier Android is the multitasking getting hit, likely by the OEM bloatware. Even without changing ROMs the first thing I'd do is disable apps that are of zero value.
Yes, iOS seems to dedicate 50-90% of its resources to the active app to achieve smoothness. That said I find toggling things such as Bluetooth or Wi-Fi very choppy on iOS. What's the deal with that?
Please elaborate on that. I'm not sure what you mean by choppy toggling. I use SB Settings, Velox and Auxo for toggles and they all work fine for me. Stock toggling works fine too.
 

Mthoroughbred

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#70
Please elaborate on that. I'm not sure what you mean by choppy toggling. I use SB Settings, Velox and Auxo for toggles and they all work fine for me. Stock toggling works fine too.
I'm wondering the same thing.


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iP5

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#72
Please elaborate on that. I'm not sure what you mean by choppy toggling. I use SB Settings, Velox and Auxo for toggles and they all work fine for me. Stock toggling works fine too.
My iPods are stock.

The easiest way to demonstrate would be to tap the Wi-Fi toggle repetitively. Not so fast to be unreasonable but enough to see that there seems to be a busy point at which it becomes choppy.

Now try the same frequency with the "ask to join networks" toggle.

I find the latter without issues whatsoever and the former choppy. I'm not saying I need to be flipping Wi-Fi back and forth multiple times but that I experience the same lag in normal use.

Sent from my Nexus 4
 

Europa

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#73
My iPods are stock.

The easiest way to demonstrate would be to tap the Wi-Fi toggle repetitively. Not so fast to be unreasonable but enough to see that there seems to be a busy point at which it becomes choppy.

Now try the same frequency with the "ask to join networks" toggle.

I find the latter without issues whatsoever and the former choppy. I'm not saying I need to be flipping Wi-Fi back and forth multiple times but that I experience the same lag in normal use.
Why on Earth would you need to rapidly tap the WiFi toggle, or any toggle for that matter? May I suggest a good game with rapid gunfire features to satisfy that need? :p
 

Europa

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#75
My iPods are stock.

The easiest way to demonstrate would be to tap the Wi-Fi toggle repetitively. Not so fast to be unreasonable but enough to see that there seems to be a busy point at which it becomes choppy.

Now try the same frequency with the "ask to join networks" toggle.

I find the latter without issues whatsoever and the former choppy. I'm not saying I need to be flipping Wi-Fi back and forth multiple times but that I experience the same lag in normal use.
When you toggle WiFi on and then immediately back off, you have to kill the process of searching for networks that you just started. There is no practical reason to rapidly toggle it on and off unless you are desperately searching to find something that lags on the iPhone. Since I don't use toggles like that, I've never seen this as a problem.
 

iP5

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#76
Why on Earth would you need to rapidly tap the WiFi toggle, or any toggle for that matter? May I suggest a good game with rapid gunfire features to satisfy that need? :p
As I said, "I'm not saying I need to be flipping Wi-Fi back and forth multiple times but that I experience the same lag in normal use."

I don't rapidly tap the Wi-Fi toggle. I'm saying I experience the same lag demonstrated in my example when using the unit normally. I'll grant that about 75% it works as expected but the other quarter is choppy.

I should also admit that likely I'd have learned to avoid it altogether if iOS is my daily driver. Still the point was that I'm surprised to find this lag on the latest hardware/software.

Again, I find a similar situation with the bluetooth toggle.

Sent from my Nexus 4
 

Europa

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#77
As I said, "I'm not saying I need to be flipping Wi-Fi back and forth multiple times but that I experience the same lag in normal use."

I don't rapidly tap the Wi-Fi toggle. I'm saying I experience the same lag demonstrated in my example when using the unit normally. I'll grant that about 75% it works as expected but the other quarter is choppy.

I should also admit that likely I'd have learned to avoid it altogether if iOS is my daily driver. Still the point was that I'm surprised to find this lag on the latest hardware/software.

Again, I find a similar situation with the bluetooth toggle.
I have never experienced that. Toggles work great for me and have absolutely no lag. They worked fine back in 2008 on my first iPhone as well. You might want to try restoring.
 
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#78
I have never experienced that. Toggles work great for me and have absolutely no lag. They worked fine back in 2008 on my first iPhone as well. You might want to try restoring.
Sorry, but this reminds me of a guy on another forum who couldn't see a dead pixel on his screen unless it was in a totally dark room and the screen was under a magnifying glass. Should I return it, he asked. No. Just get out of your mom's basement and get some air.
 

ednygma

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#79
Sorry, but this reminds me of a guy on another forum who couldn't see a dead pixel on his screen unless it was in a totally dark room and the screen was under a magnifying glass. Should I return it, he asked. No. Just get out of your mom's basement and get some air.
He was probably still waiting on dinner though.
 

iP5

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#80
It's not really an issue. Likely more of a timing thing that you guys have sync'd with and I've not.

Sent from my Nexus 4