Was Apple breaking mods deliberate?

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SpongebObiWan

Member
Bronze
Aug 25, 2007
218
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16
#1
IMHO, the act of Apple breaking the ability to jailbreak and modify one's iPhone, or even to unlock one's iPhone, was a deliberate act. I am not suggesting it was a malicious act, designed merely to antagonize those that have done this. But I am pretty sure that to many modders and unlockers, it will appear as a malicious act.

It is my opinion that this was predominantly about revenue and revenue possibilities. If you consider all the applications that third party developers have already come up with (but are now rendered useless by Apple), you can begin to see just how beneficial having control over these apps could benefit a company such as Apple or even AT&T.

For example, one application that was recently introduced, though not fully developed yet, was a GPS locating program. Other carriers are charging anywhere's from one minute's worth of talk time for each locating episode, to $40/month premium for this service. Just think of the revenue possibilities of only this one application. Now, multiply that by some unknown number that would represent other of the hundreds of applications already developed by third party developers that people would be willing to pay for. Now multiply this number by future applications that might be developed (though it is unclear yet whether third party developers will ever have this chance now).

From Apple's perspective (and I might add, from every other profit driven company in existence) this is possible money out of their cash drawer. And I'm quite certain this is precisely how Apple viewed this and why they included this mod breaking software in their update.

I can't imagine that Apple did not know that this would happen and that this was merely some "fluke" caused inadvertently by the few upgrades they did make to the iPhone. Apple personnel surely monitor sites such as this one and many others, and they are well aware of all the unlocking techniques and jailbreaking and modifying techniques. And quite frankly, I would be surprised to find out that they did not actually unlock and jailbreak test phones in the development of these current upgrades to the iPhone, and are well aware of the consequences to unlocked and modded phone.

That was precisely their reasoning behind the warning put out by Apple just days before the upgrade. That was merely a CYA (cover your behind) maneuver on Apple's part, to protect them (they hoped) from the backlash they were about to receive as a result of the upgrade. Now, they could always come back with the "we warned everybody in advance" response. And I expect today and in the next few days to come, you will see this from Apple.

I can almost visualize in my mind, as Apple's software developer leaders are sitting around discussing the possible ramifications after seeing the results in their own test phones. Most likely, Steve Jobs was present. And somebody likely said "We're going to receive a lot of flack about this, you know?" And then somebody else, maybe even Jobs himself, responded with "Well, let's just issue a warning a few days before the upgrade is released. That will cover us. But this is a step we must take if we hope to cash in on these program possibilities in the future".
 
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ciaran00

New Member
Bronze
Jul 21, 2007
242
0
0
#2
It's good that the company spends man hours on c---blocking hacked apps. Multiple SMS, or multi-email delete, or even cut and paste would be nice, but instead we have:
* encryption that now makes jailbreaking tough, if not impossible
* inability to download (which tells me Apple isn't confident about their own iPhone... ie... they think people would choose hacked apps over two-home-button or wifi buy-our-stuff-store)

Malicious? Sure in a way...
Within Apple's rights to do so? Totally.
 

durkadurka

New Member
Bronze
Sep 26, 2007
135
0
0
#4
Apple's in it just for the money.

I have a feeling they are trying to block third party apps as they will start offering them for sale on iTunes.
 

Velodog2

Member
Silver
Jul 19, 2007
562
0
16
#5
I vote for deliberate. Waaaay to thorough a job to be accidental. Oops! How did that encryption get in there? Hmmmm. You should make this into a poll.

My feelings are along the lines of Ciaran00's. Much time spent at Apple obsessing over locking, little time over bug fixes and new (missing) feature additions.
 

SpongebObiWan

Member
Bronze
Aug 25, 2007
218
0
16
#6
Posted elsewhere (by me), but applicable here:

In my lifetime, it's become pretty clear that money, even moreso large amounts of it, seem to frequently if not almost always, steer people away from their previously held so-called high ideals. But hey! That's businesss, right? I seem to recall words to that effect in what I think was the movie The Godfather, or some such similar movie "Hey! It's just businesss"
 

tdefriez

New Member
Bronze
Jul 2, 2007
139
0
0
#7
I think its simpler

HACKERS - (Out loud) We think we've unlocked the iPhone
ATT - iPhone must be locked and remain locked
APPLE - OK
HACKERS - We broke it and here's how to do it
ATT - What are you going to do to fix this free unlock (we never unlock phones but our competition does but)
APPLE - We can fix it
HACKERS - We'll break it again
ATT - (Waving contract at Apple) Make it stick
APPLE - We may have a way but PR will be bad
ATT - Do it
APPLE - How can we protect our butts from the PR fall out (remember the price drop PR mess)? I know issue a warning (buyer beware) and point out they broke warranty

Later at Apple - developers we could do this without breaking any eggs. Money men no it will take too long and they've broken their warranty anyway plus ATT may not like that - we'll have no problem when they cry foul due to the warning - Second thought maybe we can make some more money out of this?
 

piloting

New Member
Bronze
Sep 25, 2007
32
0
0
#8
Is that consider as monopoly? I think the government should have an antitrust law suit over Apple. They cannot block other developers to develop the 3rd party application developed for iPhone, and they try to take over that. This is not fair for other competitions. :p
 

burniksapwet

Member
Silver
Jul 5, 2007
553
0
16
#9
Was Apple breaking mods deliberate?
HELL YEAH!

Why can't they leave third party application developers alone?!? How much money to they want before they are fully satisfied? Next thing you know Apple will be charging us by by the number of taps we make on our iPhone. Hehehehehehe.
 

tdefriez

New Member
Bronze
Jul 2, 2007
139
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0
#10
All networks are monopolies

Is that consider as monopoly? I think the government should have an antitrust law suit over Apple. They cannot block other developers to develop the 3rd party application developed for iPhone, and they try to take over that. This is not fair for other competitions. :p
Why? Lock phones prove it - monopolies mean you can't use something were you choose - Supplied phones prove it monopolies are sole sellers of a product (iPhone AT&T, Sidekick T-Mobile etc.) ... Need I continue?
 

burniksapwet

Member
Silver
Jul 5, 2007
553
0
16
#11
Why? Lock phones prove it - monopolies mean you can't use something were you choose - Supplied phones prove it monopolies are sole sellers of a product (iPhone AT&T, Sidekick T-Mobile etc.) ... Need I continue?
He may be talking about the applications for the iPhone.
 
Sep 15, 2007
28
0
6
#14
HELL YEAH!

Why can they leave third party application developers alone?!? How much money to they want before they are fully satisfied? Next thing you know Apple will be charging us by by the number of taps we make on our iPhone. Hehehehehehe.
i read that Apple was always neutral with 3rd party apps. i think it was just to prevent unlocking. i don't think modding.
 

jerrettpaul

New Member
Bronze
Sep 10, 2007
110
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0
Denton, TX
#16
what is frustrating to me about the whole situation is this. we BOUGHT the phone, we GAVE them their 600/500/400 dollars, and all of their firmware updates are free (i.e. they are making NO money off of it). why is it that we cannot do what we want with our phones?

my girl has a macbook. she has COUNTLESS numbers of widgits and random things downloaded to her computer. Apple does nothing about this, because she bought it and its hers. why should it be any different with the phones. i bought it and its mine.

also, the fact that third party applications void your warranty is ridiculous. same story, when you buy a computer and download something on it and it crashes, you get it repaired (if you have a warranty). i bought an extended warranty for my phone (an extra thirty or so bucks), so why do these third party apps void my warranty?

im not tech savvy, nor am i computer savvy, but i am a consumer, and i do think this is ridiculous. :mad:
 

B-MAC

New Member
Sep 15, 2007
22
0
0
27
Ohio
#18
so wait, we cant mod phones anymore? i was just starting to look into apptap to get some games, and different prgorams...is Apple going to do this for us then?
 

piloting

New Member
Bronze
Sep 25, 2007
32
0
0
#20
i talked to Applecare about this, and it isn't true. it most definitely voids your warranty.
I think the Apple can make more money when we buy the new Apple to replace the brick one. If you use ATT, you locked to their 2 yr contract. I guess you need a phone a continue the contract, isn't it?