What happens when iPhone battery can no longer hold a charge?

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up
May 6, 2007
995
0
0
United States
#2
This is an interesting question. First of all, you shouldn't worry too much about it. As far as I can tell, it will be a relatively good battery and as long as you take care of it, the battery should last a good long while. Secondly, by the time it does happen (it it does), there will likely be consumer- based things where you get a new battery or send it in and they repair it.


So, basically, it shouldn't happen and when it does, there will likely be better options than getting a whole new iPhone. Also, some insurance on it might serve you well.
 

wjp09

Zealot
Gold
Feb 25, 2007
2,559
25
48
NJ
#3
Apple will charge you for the new battery. They may (not Apple they as in general) release a kit to allow you to change the battery by yourself.
 

ColsTiger

Zealot
Gold
Mar 8, 2007
5,856
2
38
Columbus, GA
#4
Apple will charge you for the new battery. They may (not Apple they as in general) release a kit to allow you to change the battery by yourself.
That would blow to have to send your cool phone off every two years to have the battery replaced. I hope they have a better plan than that.
 

wot_fan

New Member
Silver
Mar 7, 2007
586
0
0
48
Chicagoland
web.mac.com
#6
That would blow to have to send your cool phone off every two years to have the battery replaced. I hope they have a better plan than that.
If Apple doesn't, someone else will. By the time iPhone batteries need to be replaced I would be surprised if there aren't do it yourself kits (like the ones for iPods) available. They will probably even have batteries with higher capacities than the one(s) that were originally installed.
 

ColsTiger

Zealot
Gold
Mar 8, 2007
5,856
2
38
Columbus, GA
#7
Hmm 2 year contract 2 year battery life
Now that it has come out that At&t will be offering the iPhone with pre-paid plans, I'm thinking there may not even be a contract requirement. I'm starting to think more and more than the $499 and $599 is an unsubsidized price to any Cingular user current or new. If all that's true, then I don't think it will matter whether or not you're up for renewal or upgrade.
 

Bootlessjam

Member
Bronze
Apr 15, 2007
102
0
16
#13
The battery life of the iPhone seems to be similar to the early 5th gen iPod, if it is simialr, then it should stay over 80% of the full capacity after 400 charge cycles, that over a year of you somehow go through a complete cyle a day
 

wot_fan

New Member
Silver
Mar 7, 2007
586
0
0
48
Chicagoland
web.mac.com
#15
I heard that if you wait until the charge completely dies or close to it the battery lasts longer.
That is not true of current iPod batteries. With older technologies, batteries had "memory" and it was best to completely discharge them regularly. With current batteries if you let the battery completely discharge you can damage the battery.

Wikipedia has good info if you want to know more.

* Unlike Ni-Cd batteries, lithium-ion batteries should be charged early and often. However, if they are not used for a longer time, they should be brought to a charge level of around 40%. Lithium-ion batteries should never be "deep-cycled" like Ni-Cd batteries.[6]
* Lithium-ion batteries should never be depleted to empty (0%).
* Li-ion batteries should be kept cool. Ideally they are stored in a refrigerator. Aging will take its toll much faster at high temperatures. The high temperatures found in cars cause lithium-ion batteries to degrade rapidly.
* According to one book,[10] lithium ion batteries should not be frozen (should not be stored under -40 °C), because most lithium-ion battery electrolytes freeze at approximately −40 °C (this is much colder than the lowest temperature reached by household freezers, however).
* Li-ion batteries should be bought only when needed, because the aging process begins as soon as the battery is manufactured.[6]
* When using a notebook computer running from fixed line power over extended periods, the battery can be removed and stored in a cool place so that it is not affected by the heat produced by the computer.[6]
 

BoxKrait

New Member
Bronze
May 16, 2007
144
0
0
#16
That is not true of current iPod batteries. With older technologies, batteries had "memory" and it was best to completely discharge them regularly. With current batteries if you let the battery completely discharge you can damage the battery.

Wikipedia has good info if you want to know more.
Oh, very nice.
Never knew the newer batteries were like that. I would have messed mine up for sure.

Thx.
 

wubagel

New Member
May 22, 2007
17
0
1
#18
The Apple site lists the battery life at 5 hours for video/talk/browsing and 16 hours for audio playback.

Does anyone know how long it will last just sitting in my pocket or not in use?
 

Spin This!

New Member
Silver
May 4, 2007
504
0
0
#19
On the laptops at least, Apple recommends if you're having problems with power management, you actually run the battery down until it turns off by itself, which resets the "threshold."

This article was linked from Wikipedia's battery article:

Although lithium-ion is memory-free in terms of performance deterioration, batteries with fuel gauges exhibit what engineers refer to as "digital memory". Here is the reason: Short discharges with subsequent recharges do not provide the periodic calibration needed to synchronize the fuel gauge with the battery's state-of-charge. A deliberate full discharge and recharge every 30 charges corrects this problem. Letting the battery run down to the cut-off point in the equipment will do this. If ignored, the fuel gauge will become increasingly less accurate. (Read more in 'Choosing the right battery for portable computing', Part Two.)