Why there is no 3G support yet

Jun 27, 2007
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#1
http://www.roughlydrafted.com/RD/RDM...7E617E96A.html

And the followup:

http://www.roughlydrafted.com/RD/RDM...0976FAB5E.html

"EDGE vs. EVDO

The iPhone will likely never support EVDO. I presented EVDO as an example of a mythical high end feature that would add to the cost of the iPhone. Technically, upgrading to EVDO might not in itself necessitate a much higher price tag for the iPhone, but changing Apple's strategy to include EVDO most certainly would.

That's because EVDO is not a close competitor to EDGE, but rather a different generation of a different set of radio technologies. EVDO is related to CDMA, the set of radio technologies designed by QUALCOMM and sold by services providers Verizon and Sprint in the US, among others.

In contrast, EDGE is the existing standard for GSM data networks. GSM is a direct rival to CDMA. In the US, Cingular is the largest GSM provider, so Cingular does not--and will not ever--support EVDO, just as Verizon does not support EDGE. They are rival families of mobile data technology."

"EDGE vs HSUPA
EDGE is far faster than GPRS or old dialup networks however (both are about .03 Mb/sec), so while EDGE not capable of supporting iChat style video conferencing, it is useful enough to browse web pages, receive HTML emails, and support the other web service features demonstrated on the iPhone such as Google Maps.

EDGE is also widely deployed in the US. Newer generation technologies, including HSUPA and EVDO, are not. If the iPhone supported newer networks at launch, it would offer users less data service coverage at higher service fees. HSUPA does promise a future path for faster data, and will no doubt unlock new applications for future phones."


"EDGE vs WiFi
In addition to the factors of availability and cost, another reason for Apple going with EDGE rather than a faster network is that the iPhone won't have to rely solely on mobile phone networks for data. It's designed to use WiFi wherever it’s available.

For iPhone users in a school, home, or office with existing WiFi service, automatic use of WiFi for data service will not only be far faster, but far cheaper: free in many cases."


"Why Apple Can Force WiFi Adoption
Clearly, it is not the most brilliant of analysts who are complaining that Apple isn't offering a EVDO, a rival provider's technology, or is not forcing users to use bleeding edge 3G networks that are currently under-built and overpriced, when iPhone users will be able to use much faster and cheaper WiFi service in many areas.

With the iPhone, Apple is forcing Cingular to support and subsidize a phone that will save users money. That makes the iPhone far more useful to far more people. Remember that Apple wants to sell lots of hardware, not force users into paying high prices for mobile service.

Again, that puts Apple in the position of giving its users a better product. The prospect of high iPhone hardware sales forced Cingular to court iPhone users to get their businesss."
 

Marksman

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Jun 4, 2007
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#2
Probably compared to Edge 3G uses a lot more power, which makes the spec for the device much less appeasing to those concerned about battery life.

The specs and real life testing off the iPhone battery so far is VERY impressive.

If they used 3G it would be much less so. That is all my speculation, but I suspect it had a big part in it.
 
Jun 27, 2007
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#3
Agreed, the follow up says this:

"3G Networks and Battery life
Brad Lasky writes, "I think one of the little-known reasons that Apple didn't include HSDPA/HSUPA support, aside from its lack of ubiquity within the marketplace, is actually something much simpler: battery life.

"Using my Cingular 8525 with ‘3G’ enabled eats away at the battery at an astounding rate. I'll be lucky to get a full day of usage out of minimal browsing and moderate phone use. If I'm streaming music from the HSDPA connection, I'll get about 2 hours of use before the phone calls it quits. Much to my dismay, this problem isn't actually a [software] problem, but merely the power-hungry nature of UMTS and HSDPA.

"At 11.6 mm thick, I can't imagine Apple putting in a battery significantly more powerful than the one I have, so I think that using EDGE, for now, was probably a wise move. I've heard rumors that a more efficient radio stack is out for my 8525, but battery life still remains an issue."

In a follow up email, Lasky later added, “There are quite a few articles on howardforums.com and xda-developers about the HTC 8525 / TyTn battery life and how people are using a program to force the phone into EDGE versus using UMTS /HSDPA.”

If forcing 3G phones into EDGE only mode is a common subject of interest, perhaps Apple opted out of providing 3G support for good reason: it wanted to deliver a practical product, not just a device with bullet point features."
 
Jun 27, 2007
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#5
Yes it was, but I figured with all the reviews complaining about the speed of EDGE, new people should understand why Apple chose it over 3G. :cool:

Just trying to help out....
 

kdarling

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Jun 20, 2007
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#6
Doesn't matter what the battery life is, if it can't do the job.

Also, consider that you'll spend 5 times longer surfing on EDGE than with high-speed internet. That chews up battery too!
 

TrippalHealicks

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Mar 2, 2007
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#7
Doesn't matter what the battery life is, if it can't do the job.

Also, consider that you'll spend 5 times longer surfing on EDGE than with high-speed internet. That chews up battery too!
Agreed. Blackjack had both, and you could DISABLE 3G from a simple menu selection.
 

wjp09

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Feb 25, 2007
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#8
I would rather surf longer at a slower speed then have 3 hours of fast paced browsing. *estimate
 

kdarling

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Jun 20, 2007
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#9
I would rather surf longer at a slower speed then have 3 hours of fast paced browsing. *estimate

In my 3 hours at high speed I'm going to be able to download 5x the amount of data that you can at slow speed in the same amount of time.

In other words, it'd take you about 15 hours to do what I'd do in 3.

I really don't feel like going back to dialup speeds.

And, as TrippalHealicks pointed out, most people turn off the high speed when they don't need it. So they get the best of all worlds.