Why "unlocking" is a disaster waiting to happen?

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Youngbinks

Zealot
Gold
Jun 4, 2007
7,617
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30
Atlanta, Georgia
#2
Are you asking why unlocking is a disaster? Or making a statement? If you don't know what you're doing then unlocking can definitely be a disaster, as many people have proven already with their bricked iPhones.
 

Chris716

New Member
Nov 29, 2007
807
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IL
#3
i agree unlocking will be a disaster if you have no clue what your doing... But on the other hand if you know what your doing its a piece of cake
 

Chris716

New Member
Nov 29, 2007
807
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#5
jailbreaking allows you to put 3rd party apps.. Unlocking lets you use on any gsm network... your title and first thread don't mention that at all you cant even tell what you want to know by the first topic...
 

Arcano

New Member
Bronze
Nov 13, 2007
95
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#6
jailbreaking allows you to put 3rd party apps.. Unlocking lets you use on any gsm network... your title and first thread don't mention that at all you cant even tell what you want to know by the first topic...
Let me explain myself better, my fear -since I own an unlocked iphone- was that the unlocking could in the future translates in some kind of problem for the device itself, something like when people mod a videogame console and other people say "hey...that could harm the motherboard in the future".
 

meiphones_brill

New Member
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Nov 16, 2007
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#7
Let me explain myself better, my fear -since I own an unlocked iphone- was that the unlocking could in the future translates in some kind of problem for the device itself, something like when people mod a videogame console and other people say "hey...that could harm the motherboard in the future".
These things are possible - so the basis for the fear is reasonable. In reality it's very rare, and would only affect the first handful of adopters. The news would spread very quickly. Permanent Hardware damage caused by software modification is rare, but not impossible by any means.

These things are all calculated risks - know the dangers, understand the risks and then make reasoned intelligent choices as a result.
 

zanDark

New Member
Dec 14, 2007
80
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Athens - Greece
#8
These things are all calculated risks - know the dangers, understand the risks and then make reasoned intelligent choices as a result.
sorry if this has already been asked by 1000 other newB's, but what are the risks of Jailbreaking your iPhone?

the impression I got by searching through the forum is that any problems encountered during Jailbreaking are solvable by restoring the iPhone...is it possible to completely mess it up? :eek:
 

Griffinaz

Zealot
Gold
Oct 5, 2007
1,046
13
38
Phoenix, Arizona
#9
sorry if this has already been asked by 1000 other newB's, but what are the risks of Jailbreaking your iPhone?

the impression I got by searching through the forum is that any problems encountered during Jailbreaking are solvable by restoring the iPhone...is it possible to completely mess it up? :eek:
Anytime you modify an operating system from the way it was distributed and "approved" to be used you run the risk of having problems. The main problem that people have with jailbreaking the phone is running software that has not been thoroughly tested and they end up with different problems ranging from slow systems all the way up to it not working any longer. Restoring the phone will fix these but just simply uninstalling the program that caused the problem works in a lot of cases as long as you can still get installer to launch. Unlocking is a bit more severe and dangerous.
 

meiphones_brill

New Member
Silver
Nov 16, 2007
797
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0
#10
sorry if this has already been asked by 1000 other newB's, but what are the risks of Jailbreaking your iPhone?

the impression I got by searching through the forum is that any problems encountered during Jailbreaking are solvable by restoring the iPhone...is it possible to completely mess it up? :eek:
Yes. Writing firmware to flash can, if it's interrupted, cause permanent hardware damage. Personally I've never seen an iPhone that wouldn't recover though.

90% of the desperate cries on this site are people who just haven't read the instructions.

The risks are more like - phone downtime because it's in hospital and you're working on it, and the potential of installing unsafe software which could steal your credit card details and pickle your cat. Your cat may be more or less worried by this, depending on its outlook on life.
 

Tinman

Evangelist
Gold
Jul 16, 2007
4,334
183
63
Aridzona
#12
Yes. Writing firmware to flash can, if it's interrupted, cause permanent hardware damage.
Technically the "firmware" on the iPhone is written to every time you sync with iTunes, add a new phone number--just about everything you do on the iPhone writes something to its flash memory.

Flash that can be problematic (bootloader and baseband) is not touched by jailbreaking.

So the risk of ending up with a truly bricked iPhone just due to jailbreaking is pretty much statistically insignificant. In fact the term "brick" is almost always misused when it comes to the iPhone.


--
Mike
 

scandalex

Member
Silver
Sep 16, 2007
771
0
16
#13
Technically the "firmware" on the iPhone is written to every time you sync with iTunes, add a new phone number--just about everything you do on the iPhone writes something to its flash memory.

Flash that can be problematic (bootloader and baseband) is not touched by jailbreaking.

So the risk of ending up with a truly bricked iPhone just due to jailbreaking is pretty much statistically insignificant. In fact the term "brick" is almost always misused when it comes to the iPhone.


--
Mike
I always thought bricked had to do with unlocking; not jailbreak.
 

Tinman

Evangelist
Gold
Jul 16, 2007
4,334
183
63
Aridzona
#14
I always thought bricked had to do with unlocking; not jailbreak.
Bricked has been used to describe most anything that happens to an iPhone, including not being able to make calls due to unlocking, updating, etc. It also has been used when something isn't working right, but the iPhone still works ("Did I just brick my iPhone?!").

But bricked traditionally means you have nothing more than a paperweight on your hands. Not something with limited functionality, or something that can be restored again to full functionality.

Heck the iPhone even has an app named iBrickr.


--
Mike
 

impaler

Member
Silver
Apr 28, 2007
522
2
18
#15
Unlocking is a HUGE mistake. It's too risky. Too many have bricked their phones, they void warranties, etc. I like trying stuff as much as the next guy, but those that unlock their phones are technically voilating the agreement they made with Apple/AT&T, and if they do so knowingly, I have no sympathy for them. They get what they deserve, while people like me that follow the rules are able to just be patient for new features.