Will you be willing to pay for iOS 7 apps that you previously owned?

ZAT

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#22
Unlikely for expensive apps. I would tolerate a small upgrade fee, or having to repurchase some cheap apps, but anything over $5 and I'd pass.
 

Bennyboy

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#23
99. Apps yes, anything more than that no.
 

jmp316

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#24
I have "re-purchased" Tapatalk and 1Password, reluctantly, based on updates. Hope I don't have to do this often...
 

imutter

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#26
I don't know what I will do ...it's kind like did I buy a DVD after VHS and Blueray after DVD etc
This seems to be how it goes updating costs if you want new but it still stinks.
 

IllusionEntity

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#27
I think that if you have to pay for the majority of the apps you have again that it will give people a reason to try an Android device. If you have to pay for the apps again then you might as well.
 

Europa

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#29
I think that if you have to pay for the majority of the apps you have again that it will give people a reason to try an Android device. If you have to pay for the apps again then you might as well.
I Googled it yesterday since I hadn't heard of the possibility of upgrade fees until this thread was started. All the articles said the same thing: There's little doubt that the majority of iOS 7 updates to existing apps will be free...

I'm thinking if anything, a few of them will have a small upgrade fee, maybe 99¢. I seriously doubt they'd try to charge $25 again for a $25 app. I think this is going to be a non-issue.
 

patrickj

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#30
Yes. Absolutely yes. For apps that I often use and / or are important to me, I will happily pay. Great apps are one of the biggest attractions of iOS. And great apps don't grow on trees. They can take enormous amounts of developers' time to create, maintain, and support.

I want to do all I can to support the developers of great iOS apps.

And for anyone whose attitude is that they'll never pay for this sort of thing, and they'll never buy apps that cost more than $1.99 / 3.99 or whatever, I'd say be careful what you wish for. If we end up at a place where developers can't afford to make and maintain great apps then everybody loses.
 

Europa

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#31
Yes. Absolutely yes. For apps that I often use and / or are important to me, I will happily pay. Great apps are one of the biggest attractions of iOS. And great apps don't grow on trees. They can take enormous amounts of developers' time to create, maintain, and support.

I want to do all I can to support the developers of great iOS apps.

And for anyone whose attitude is that they'll never pay for this sort of thing, and they'll never buy apps that cost more than $1.99 / 3.99 or whatever, I'd say be careful what you wish for. If we end up at a place where developers can't afford to make and maintain great apps then everybody loses.
So does this mean you'd be willing to pay $25 per year, every year, for a great app that has zero feature updates and was advertised as a one-time $25 charge? If not, where do you draw the line? Updates and support are part of that initial charge. It will set a precedent if we support paying for updates now and it will give people a really good reason not to update the OS. I would pay for a new version of an app that has significant feature updates if I wanted those features, but not simply for iOS compatibility.
 

patrickj

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#32
So does this mean you'd be willing to pay $25 per year, every year, for a great app that was advertised as a one-time $25 charge? Updates and support are part of that initial charge. It will set a precedent we support paying for updates now and it will give people a really good reason not to update the OS. I would pay for an app that has significant feature updates if I wanted those features, but I do not support paying for compatibility with new versions of iOS.


I think very few developers of $25 apps are going to feel they need to create a full new app for every year's update of iOS. My understanding is that the changes in iOS 7 are just much deeper than in iOS 5 or 6 - so major app overhauls are on the cards for a high percentage of developers. (http://daringfireball.net/linked/2013/08/06/hockenberry-7) and even so, most devs are updating apps rather than creating new ones.

It's worth keeping in mind that it's down to Apple that devs even need to think like this - in terms of new app rather than paid upgrade - because Apple doesn't allow them to offer paid-for upgrades. I think Apple should allow for paid upgrades - and I would be perfectly OK with paying for those as well, for apps that are good enough and that prove they offer significant upgrades. Heck, most of us have been paying for upgrades for years with our desktop apps. Why should we expect upgrades for free, forever, from quality iOS apps? That's just a recipe for developers going bankrupt.
 

Europa

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#34
Here are a couple examples: MLB at Bat is sold as a subscription. You know what you're getting into and there are no surprises. You pay $700 for Photoshop for Mac. It will continue to work each year until your computer is obsolete. You don't have to pay for PS again because you update to Lion and then again because you update to Mountain Lion and again for each new OS update. You do, however, pay if you want to update to the newest version of PS if you want the new features, and rightfully so. Adobe put in countless hours upgrading it and adding new features. And Adobe doesn't charge you full cost for those updates, either.

How many apps did we have to pay for again when Apple changed the iPhone's screen resolution? I don't remember paying for any. The developers had to do a little bit of work there. They weren't forced to make them the new resolution and they aren't forced to make them match iOS 7, either. It behooves them to, but it's not a requirement. They just need to make them compatible with the new OS and app support is part of that initial charge.

I'm just saying I don't support paid updates for every new OS when there are no new features.
 

patrickj

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#35
Here are a couple examples: MLB at Bat is sold as a subscription. You know what you're getting into and there are no surprises. You pay $700 for Photoshop for Mac. It will continue to work each year until your computer is obsolete. You don't have to pay for PS again because you update to Lion and then again because you update to Mountain Lion and again for each new OS update. You do, however, pay if you want to update to the newest version of PS if you want the new features, and rightfully so. Adobe put in countless hours upgrading it and adding new features. And Adobe doesn't charge you full cost for those updates, either.

How many apps did we have to pay for again when Apple changed the iPhone's screen resolution? I don't remember paying for any. The developers had to do a little bit of work there. They weren't forced to make them the new resolution and they aren't forced to make them match iOS 7, either. It behooves them to, but it's not a requirement. They just need to make them compatible with the new OS and app support is part of that initial charge.

I'm just saying I don't support paid updates for every new OS when there are no new features.
Fine, but I think your example is kind of going along with what I've said above.

For starters, you're citing a $700 application. Not a $4.99 or $6.99 or even $25 app. $700 should give you an app that will last for years.

And, you've mentioned that Adobe can, quite rightfully, charge for upgrades to new versions with compelling new features. iOS developers do not have this option available to them. Apple doesn't allow it.
 

Europa

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#36
Fine, but I think your example is kind of going along with what I've said above.

For starters, you're citing a $700 application. Not a $4.99 or $6.99 or even $25 app. $700 should give you an app that will last for years.

And, you've mentioned that Adobe can, quite rightfully, charge for upgrades to new versions with compelling new features. iOS developers do not have this option available to them. Apple doesn't allow it.
I don't think that's fair and it's only going to take us off track here. PS is a powerful program. It costs hundreds more for a good reason. It takes countless more hours to develop and it is much more powerful than a $5 iOS app. You get what you pay for. Just because an app doesn't have a high initial cost, doesn't mean we should have to pay the full price over and over. Cost is dictated by the quality and features of the app/program. $5 is a drop in a bucket in comparison, but that doesn't mean that the policy and percentage should be different since it isn't a huge amount of money to start out with.

But overall, I think we're on the same thing now that you've clarified your position.
 

acosmichippo

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#37
I think one thing you need to keep in mind is when apps are updated for a new iOS, they typically add new features as a result of new APIs. So in addition to basic compatibility support, they often do add new features that were not possible before. This doesn't happen with desktop apps, at least not to the same degree.
 

Europa

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#38
I think one thing you need to keep in mind is when apps are updated for a new iOS, they typically add new features as a result of new APIs. So in addition to basic compatibility support, they often do add new features that were not possible before. This doesn't happen with desktop apps, at least not to the same degree.
We typically see a bunch of updates when the new OS versions come out, but in my experience they usually just say "iOS x capability." Updates with new features seem to be staggered throughout the year and not have any relation to the OS updates. One exception I can think of is when Apple enabled multitasking with iOS 4. Those updates did include a new feature - a feature that took them very little time to enable.
 

iPutz

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#39
My iPhone 5 and iPad 3 are not jail-broken and 95% of the apps I use are free apps from the App Store. There is only one that I would pay $$ for to hang onto and that is the "Pages" app. Everything Else I can probably find a free or low-cost alternative for if one of my current apps decides to charge for an upgrade that is only an upgrade for compatibility purposes. If the app's designer ups the ante by designing in better bells and whistles than I may consider it but only if is an app that I use frequently and I am convinced that it is a one time charge only.
 

Sanjeev

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#40
There is time and effort involved in creating applications that are iOS 7 compatible. Some apps will essentially end up being complete re-writes or completely new apps. If your favorite app now requires you repurchase, are you willing to pay for iOS 7 apps that you previously owned?
Why should we pay for an application which has already been paid for! It's the duty of the app vendors to provide its customers the after sale services. They are bound to keep their apps updated. When they sell the application there is nothing like they tell us that this application is for the current OS and you have to repay for the updated version. I am against it.


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