Would you buy a 12.9-inch iPad?

Discussion in 'iPad Air' started by chris, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. chris

    chris Administrator
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    There are reports today of a 12.9-inch iPad display in production. It would feature a UHD (ultra high-definition) display. Seems to me this is a push to make people transition to a post-PC world. I'm a computer guy. It's take everything I have to give up my desktop mac and move to a laptop. I still haven't made the move and still question whether it is the right decision. For me, I cannot imaging moving to an iPad, but I'm firmly entrenched in my way of thinking. This despite knowing how productive you can be on an iPad. I'm guessing that younger people might not be so tied to computers, not so tied to Windows 8 or Mac OS X.

    Would you buy a 12.9-inch iPad? If so, would it be replacing a PC/Mac? What makes this size display so compelling and why would Apple be considering the expansion of the iPad line?
     
    #1 chris, Nov 19, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  2. RoofMonkey

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    Why? To give the other larger tablets, Surface/pro, Nexus, etc... Something else to have to top in size.
    IF they think it's to replace a laptop or whatever, it had better have less limitations than iOS does on the iPad.
    MUST have at least a micro SD slot.
    The limitations that everyone complains about in iOS, file system, customization, etc... would need to seriously change.
     
  3. chris

    chris Administrator
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    There are adapters for microSD. I think the FileSystem ship has sailed, along with customization. I'm sure there is a market for people who don't care or want either of those. They need a computing device for web surfing, typing the occasional letter or play a few games.
    Storage is always an issue, but what if this shipped with 256GB of storage? I've got a 2TB internal hard drive in my Mac Pro. For me, that wouldn't cut it. I also use Photoshop with regularity, FTP and a slew of programs. My parents on the other hand, they have an older iMac and and older iPad. I could see something like this that had the option for a cool aluminum stand for 'desktop mode' and maybe an Apple keyboard. The Logitech Ultra-thin keyboards are great, have dedicated iPad buttons and all. Imagine if Apple shipped one just like it, but aluminum and matchy-matchy.

    What about kids? There are a better selection of learning apps, books and more for iPad.

    Right now, the iPad Air and iPad mini are marketed as supplemental devices, but Apple's been very aggressive in promoting the power of these products. I don't think the vast majority of consumers and media think of them as 'desktops'. I bet a larger iPad with accessories mentioned, iWork/iCloud could be positioned as an iPad that could replace computers...for some people.*





    *not me, they'll have to take my computer from my dead, cold hands.
     
  4. bballrob

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    My initial thought is, NO. I will actually be making the decision today whether to size down to the Mini or stick with the full sized iPad Air. I just don't ever see myself with a LARGER iPad than the one I currently have.
     
  5. Europa

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    Why does a bigger screen and UHD give you the impression they are intended to replace desktops? They are far to limited in capabilities and storage space to replace a computer for most people. I'm not sure how a bigger, clearer screen would change that.
     
  6. chris

    chris Administrator
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    All of Apple's mobile offerings (laptops) start with 128GB of storage, no less than a 'Pro iPad'. Admittedly, it requires a change in thinking from a user's perspective. It's not for everyone, but I think if marketed correctly, it could help push the transition away from desktops. Windows 8 seems to force the move to 'Touch' and in some ways, maybe they are driving that shift. Someone with a 7 year old PC who browses the web, watches videos and does email might think -- both are touch and the iPad Pro is sufficient for my needs.

    Something like this doesn't have to be for everyone initially or 'most'. A $900-$1000 iPad isn't going to do big numbers. You'd also have people saying, I can just get a MacBook Air. There will however be some who are done with traditional computing, done with the hassles. Instant on, a ton of apps, plenty of which are free.

    I think it being larger than an iPad seems to lend itself to being a desktop replacement. I'm sure there are some who already have an iPad and that's it. A bigger display, with appropriate stand, becomes that futuristic post-PC desktop.

    Pitching it as a complete computing solution advances how people view iOS and also makes it an easier sell at just under $1k. That's expensive for a secondary or tertiary (laptop) device.

    I'm just thinking out loud.
     
  7. Europa

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    I just don't see this happening for many people. You can't install computer programs or even do an full restore in iTunes without a Mac or PC. They would at least need to add file system access for drag and drop and allow a Time Machine drive to be connected to it so ALL of the media can quickly and easily be backed up to another drive. iCloud doesn't quite cut it as a standalone. You still have to keep your videos and non-itunes-purchased music backed up elsewhere. You could keep it all in the cloud on DropBox if you wanted to pay for extra space, but that would get expensive.
     
  8. Santa

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    It wouldn't change that. This would not be a laptop replacement. So if it can't replace a laptop, what good would it be? I guess maybe a portable PC for someone who doesn't really need a PC. But then they probably don't need such a big screen.

    I can barely imagine carrying around an iPad mini along with my laptop. There's no way I'd carry anything bigger.
     
  9. acosmichippo

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    I'll just leave this here...



    It's clear they're not going to be merging tablets ant PC's any time soon. So that means this would essentially be just a gigantic iPad. But then again, in 2010 everyone was calling the iPad just a gigantic iPod Touch, so who knows.
     
  10. djwindsor

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    I am sure they will sell but I think the current size is the limit for me. I would find anything bigger a little unwieldy.
     
  11. Sassytallsista

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    I would purchase one. My current Ipad/iPhone has replaced my desktop/laptop already. My employer is talking about moving from laptop to Ipad as well(cloud). Basically I am a casual ..email...web...music... movie...light gamer......I don't need a "top" for those.


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  12. Al Vila

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    I would


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  13. Leo

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  14. fury

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    I would do it, given the right utility. If all they're going to do with it is change the screen size, like they did with the mini, it won't do me any good.

    While the iPad is far ahead in many ways, there is one thing that Windows tablets have that the iPad just does not: note taking. By that, I don't mean notes in the traditional computer sense of notes you type up with a keyboard. I mean good old-fashioned handwriting, something that despite all odds resists obsolescence to this day. There's no good way to enter complex STEM notes on a keyboard (equations, drawings, etc).

    I just spent a semester with an Android device with a Wacom pen, trying to make it do what I need it to do for school. The punchline to that story is "you mean I just lost 45 pages of notes because Samsung thinks I should have to hit a save button before the app crashes?" On the day of a test, no less.

    I then went on the rebound, attempting to make a Windows 8 tablet do it, and I'm disappointed by Microsoft's latest stuff. I'm left with suboptimal performance from the technologies available today, or going back in time to what worked for me in 2004-2007. I wish Apple would solve that problem for me.

    My iPad was effectively a brick while in physics class this past semester. I can read the PowerPoint documents the instructor used for lectures, I can open up Word documents she posted for homework solutions, I can even read the textbook itself, but for the life of me, I cannot annotate any of those documents, or take notes on the tablet itself with any measure of success.

    With a Wacom or similar active digitizer pen, and the right software, Windows has had this down pat for about 9 years. I used some of the first XP Tablet PCs in school back then (Windows Journal, and later OneNote), and they did so extremely well at what I used them for, I am about ready to go hunting on eBay for one of those, instead of trying to shoehorn what's out there today into what I need it to do.

    There's nothing that compares to real pen digitizers on the iPad. The styluses on the market are limited to using the capacitive touchscreen, which means accidental input from your hand while it's resting on the screen. While it's better than the old resistive touchscreens, it doesn't hold a candle to a Wacom that can pick up handwriting about as good as you can get on pen and paper.

    There's also nothing that can really match the integrated handwriting recognition & drawing features I had in Windows Journal and OneNote. I can jot down some quick key words side-by-side with a complex diagram from class, then later on search for those key words and it'll recognize it and bring it up, even if I leave it as handwriting on the page itself. Basically like googling through my notes. This single feature makes it immediately and immensely more powerful than manually sifting through page after page of dead tree, all the while keeping the same flexibility as pen & paper. I don't have to change input modes, I don't have to press buttons, it just takes my writing down and does the right thing with it after the fact. (This feature alone, in fact, made me an A in statistics class back in the day. Studying for a test was about as hard as typing the key words into the search box and then looking over the notes I took from that day in class to refresh my memory)

    The nearest analog on an iPad is the combination of Evernote and Penultimate, but they're just not even in OneNote's league, even if there was a real stylus.

    The "just works" thing is something Apple gets right quite a lot, and I hope they make a run for the education market with the iPad Pro and do pen-based note taking right. An iPad combined with the power of note taking features done right, that would be absolutely killer.

    My trial with Windows 8 did not give me hope that Microsoft would keep a lead in this area. I tried the Windows 8 store metro version of OneNote (previously known as OneNote MX), and it's an atrocity. It does not have the ability to search handwritten notes, or the recording, or the dragging and dropping, all features that made OneNote the killer app for note taking at a lecture. It's about as crippled as the OneNote app for iPad.

    The desktop version can record audio/video while you take notes, and then refer you back to that audio later when you're reviewing your notes. Or, if you're lucky and the professor posts the PowerPoint presentations before the lecture, you can just put that onto OneNote and start marking it up page by page as you go.
     
    #14 fury, Dec 31, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  15. Napoleon PhoneApart

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    tl;dr: Maybe.


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  16. fury

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    tl;dr is my middle name
     

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