Biggest disappointment about the iPhone 5?

Mandelbrot

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For me, the biggest disappointment is not the hardware, but iOS 6. Specifically, the Maps app in OS6.
 

acosmichippo

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Resale value my butt. I don't buy every new iPhone, so I have the 32 GB iPhone 4. Not any offers on mine except spam offers on Craigslist. The only reason the iPhone 5 is on my radar is that it is faster using an A6 chip vs. the A4 in my iPhone 4.
Then you're not doin' it right. Look at ebay. I just sold my 32GB iPhone 4 there for $240. Pretty solid considering it's over two years old.
 

iP5

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2. Future proof (it looks like it's set for going USB3 when the flash storage gets fast enough)
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That's funny, you know they have adapters from standard; to mini, to micro USB.

There's just no excuse that claims to serve the customer and have a proprietary cable. It should be an industry wide standard and then apply a certified logo to differentiate supported and unsupported pairings.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2
 

acosmichippo

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You ignored his other points though. There ARE actually benefits to lightning over USB. Whether or not you think they're worth it is a different story.
 

Napoleon PhoneApart

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iP5 said:
That's funny, you know they have adapters from standard; to mini, to micro USB.

There's just no excuse that claims to serve the customer and have a proprietary cable. It should be an industry wide standard and then apply a certified logo to differentiate supported and unsupported pairings.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2
Speaking of unsupported pairings, I deleted your duplicate post. :D
 
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fury

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iP5 said:
That's funny, you know they have adapters from standard; to mini, to micro USB.

There's just no excuse that claims to serve the customer and have a proprietary cable. It should be an industry wide standard and then apply a certified logo to differentiate supported and unsupported pairings.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2
Industry wide standards are pretty hard to do well. I know from first hand experience that USB is a cluster kludge. That's one reason why Apple still supports UART traffic in lightning. Moving to micro USB would have forced every accessory maker that plans on physically talking to the device to have a USB controller in their product, and it wouldn't have worked with older accessories that use UART. Talking to iDevices over USB adds much more complexity to the product, even if they already have a USB controller. It raises the barrier to entry. Apple can expose more functionality on a Lightning connector than just USB. Keeping UART possible with the new connector was the best possible thing they could have done for accessory makers and consumers. What do you propose, add a port for every industry standard connection that comes out?

I'm sitting here looking at my Atrix and can't help but notice it has one connector for Micro USB and one connector for Micro HDMI. Do these things integrate together seamlessly? Not that I know of. They each serve the lowest common denominator as industry standards often do. There's no magic that you can do with the combination of a USB connector and an HDMI connector to make it more than the sum of its parts. The Atrix doesn't do USB audio. The Bluetooth on it doesn't do AVRCP 1.3. These standards have been there for years, but it's like hearding elephants to try to get every company on the same page about implementing them. I don't think it serves the customer better to have a bunch of ugly ports sticking out the side of their phone that each connect to a different technology, a collection of things that work but not well.

I compare this with the original iPhone announcement in 2007 when Steve Jobs described the reason for eschewing all the hardware buttons.

Steve Jobs said:
And what happens if you think of a great idea six months from now? You can't run around and add a button to these things, they're already shipped. So what do you do? It doesn't work, because the buttons and the controls can't change. They can't change for each application, and they can't change down the road if you think of another great idea you want to add to this product. Well, how do you solve this? Hmm. It turns out, we have solved it! We solved it in computers 20 years ago. We solved it with a bitmapped screen that could display anything we want. Put any user interface up.
Lightning is the electrical equivalent of the bitmapped display. Adaptive pins that can do whatever the device decides to make them do. This means updates can theoretically add functionality to the device later on down the line that it can then present to accessories.

USB was this promise of a do-anything standard (hell, universal is in its name), but its implementation fell short in enough places that Apple is smart to not rely on it as the sole link in the system. I dare any company to come up with something that so many developers can get behind and make a cohesive accessory ecosystem. I would LOVE to work on Android accessories that do the same thing as iPod accessories. Unfortunately Android Open Accessory just doesn't compare.
 
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