Is the iPhone GSM?

chris

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I read Cingular has it till 2009 and it's on the Cingular web site NOW.
Could that mean it will be in before June ?
No, I just think they are collecting email addresses in advance of the release. It still needs to get FCC approval.

-Chris
 
Jan 14, 2007
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Who knows when the iPhone comes out in canada please someone tell me i really cant find out when it comes out and if u can can u plaese give me the price thank u
 

iPhoneTopsites

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Jan 14, 2007
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Who knows when the iPhone comes out in canada please someone tell me i really cant find out when it comes out and if u can can u plaese give me the price thank u
I don't know who this guy is, but for what it's worth:

From http://www.mytelus.com/money/news/article.do?pageID=ex_businesss/home&articleID=2512647:"There's no confirmed reports that Apple will launch iPhone in Canada," he said in an interview.
 

Kabeyun

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What application chan run on iPhone ?
Is it java or j2me or other compatible?
:cool:
Right now, I don't think the public knows. The iPhone is apparently a closed platform (for now) which means that the only apps on it are ones put there by Apple before you buy it.

Little outside Cupertino is also known about the OS it's running, and that includes system extenders like Java, Flash, & Quicktime. It's probably a somewhat stripped down version of the Mac OS, but anything's possible. (My system folder is 1.85 GB, and that's on a fully loaded MacBook Pro. Even at 1 GB a system folder could fit onto an iPhone albeit with a severe storage penalty, particularly for those getting the 4 GB version.)

It's fun to speculate, though!

-K

EDIT: Sorry, I didn't realize I was replying to a post back on page 1. Drr.
 

iPhoney

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Jan 11, 2007
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Removable battery

Hi, Chris. Can you confirm that the iPhone does not have a removable battery? Seems like a risky choice for a phone.
 

chris

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Hi, Chris. Can you confirm that the iPhone does not have a removable battery? Seems like a risky choice for a phone.
They got it right with the iPod.;) I think in order for Apple to create a stunning design, they needed to go with an internal battery. The battery will be a critical piece to the success of the iPhone.
 

chris

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What does GSM mean?
GSM is the wireless technology used by Cingular and T-Mobile in the US. It is also the predominant technology in Europe. According to Google definitions, [SIZE=-1]GSM: Global System for Mobile communication. A European digital standard for mobile or cellular telephony

[/SIZE]
[SIZE=-1]If it has a SIM Card, then it is a GSM phone. GSM is nice because you can remove the SIM card when traveling (if the phone is unlocked). In the case of the iPhone, it will be locked to the Cingular Wireless network. You'll be able to use the iPhone in other countries that support GSM, but will pay Cingular international rates. Whereas if it were unlocked, you could purchase a SIM card and swap them while traveling.

-Chris


[/SIZE]
 

rbaron

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Thanks much.....

I am curious as to what Cingular will charge for their service. I mean with the iPhone costing $499 and $599 I would hope that Cingular cuts a break with the cost for web browsing, text messaging and email.

Any speculation on the cost? I have Verizon now and will switch when the iPhones are available. I just hope they don't sock us like $100 a month for all the services.
 

chris

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Thanks much.....

I am curious as to what Cingular will charge for their service. I mean with the iPhone costing $499 and $599 I would hope that Cingular cuts a break with the cost for web browsing, text messaging and email.

Any speculation on the cost? I have Verizon now and will switch when the iPhones are available. I just hope they don't sock us like $100 a month for all the services.
My guess is that you should plan on $80+ with a standard plan along with unlimited data.

-Chris
 

rbaron

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My guess is that you should plan on $80+ with a standard plan along with unlimited data.

-Chris
Well I wasn't that far off. I said $100 and you guestamated $80+. The price we pay for technology.
 

billyatkins57

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Jan 29, 2007
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voicemail?

How does Apples voicemail work? From what I have seen on their website it looks like you can see your voicemails and choose which ones to listen to. Does the "visual" voicemail as they call it, also show you the voicemail as a text? This is something that I have been needing for a long time...
 

Limatoones

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Jan 30, 2007
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I'm more concerned about the "operation" of the iPhone.
There is that little "on/off" button on the top or a "hold" button or whatever they called it. When you press that does it literally "turn off" the phone so that it can't receive phone calls or does it just put it to "sleep" to conserve energy but can be "awaken" for incoming media (such as phone calls, emails, instant messages, and the like).

Also, if you are going to put it in your pocket, do you have to hit that little button? I'm confused. If you don't want random input on your phone you need to be able to "disable" it in some way before you put it away. The only way I saw to do that was to push the little button on the top, and when it rings do you still have to push the button, slide the slider, to get into the phone in order to answer a call? That seems like a lot of work.

I wish there were a LOT more demos out there.
 

Kabeyun

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Does the "visual" voicemail as they call it, also show you the voicemail as a text?
If you're asking if a voice message will be transated into a text message, I'd bet the farm the answer is no. This requires voice recognition software which is most certainly not ready for primetime, particularly over a wireless connection. The innovation of the iPhone's voicemail treatment is that you can select any message to hear withoug going through all of them in order (a parallel vs serial algorithm).

When you press that does it literally "turn off" the phone so that it can't receive phone calls or does it just put it to "sleep" to conserve energy but can be "awaken" for incoming media (such as phone calls, emails, instant messages, and the like).
There's still a lot we don't know. I think there's more that we don't know than that which we do. That being said, I think a few speculations are safe. One safe one is that turning off the phone will not disable it. There's no point in having a mobile phone if, when "off," it can't passively listen for incoming calls, messages, or push mail. The On/Off button will turn off the screen and save power. The wireless radio will still be on. It's possible that there'll be a way to further save power by actually turning off the wireless radio, possibly by holding down the On/Off button (the way, say, a Treo works).

Also, if you are going to put it in your pocket, do you have to hit that little button? I'm confused. If you don't want random input on your phone you need to be able to "disable" it in some way before you put it away. The only way I saw to do that was to push the little button on the top, and when it rings do you still have to push the button, slide the slider, to get into the phone in order to answer a call? That seems like a lot of work.
This has already been demoed. You need to slide your finger left-to-right to activate the iPhone after turning it on. This eliminates accidental input. One thing it wouldn't do, however, is prevent your pocket from accidentally turning on the iPhone, draining the battery while it waits for you to slide your finger across the screen. This may be addressed with an auto-timeout feature or a lock button like an iPod has. (One might argue what's the point of the finger slide if you first neex to do a button slide. Good point.) I think to answer an incoming call the finger slide is necessary (so your pocket doesn't answer it) but the On/Off button is bypassed.

I wish there were a LOT more demos out there.
So do we! The upcoming edition of Macworld has a cover story on the iPhone. We'll see if they've scooped anything new.

-K
 

billyatkins57

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Jan 29, 2007
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The feature of receiving calls while the phone is "off" could be a life saver as it will probably extend the battery life fairly long. Does anyone know what the expected battery life on the iPhone will be? This is one of the major downfalls of my current phone. As to what has been posted about the iPhone voicemail, it would seem logical for Apple to provide this. I believe that there are actually a few companies already converting voicemail into text. I appreciate the response.
 

Seattle18

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Jan 27, 2007
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Many of these questions can be answered by watching the Keynote Address. In it, Steve describes the Proximity Sensor which is in the earpiece. It senses when the iPhone is close to an object, and then automatically turns off the screen for two reasons - to conserve battery life, and to prevent you from pressing any touch keys while up to your cheek. Obviously, it will also turn off automatically when inserted into a case, much like a BlackBerry, but without the magnet being needed, so it's better in my opinion. So you will not have to press any buttons when putting it in a case or pocket, and it will not turn on while in your pocket or a case unless the top button is pressed. The button on top does put it to "sleep," just as when the proximity sensor senses an object close to it, in case you want to use that feature when out of the case but not in use. For instance, if sitting it on a table after use, press the top button to turn off the screen to conserve battery life.

I hope they add similar BlackBerry features such as profile settings for when in the case as opposed to when out of the case, but we'll wait and see on that one. Further, there is the ability to actually turn off the wireless radio, presumably through the Settings icon on the home screen, which is the same as Flight mode - called so for use on airplanes so as to not interfere with the electronics aboard an aircraft.
 

Limatoones

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The feature of receiving calls while the phone is "off" could be a life saver as it will probably extend the battery life fairly long. Does anyone know what the expected battery life on the iPhone will be? This is one of the major downfalls of my current phone. As to what has been posted about the iPhone voicemail, it would seem logical for Apple to provide this. I believe that there are actually a few companies already converting voicemail into text. I appreciate the response.
From Apple's website for Battery life...

Up to 5 hours Talk/Video/Browsing
Up to 16 hours audio playback