Save battery, for those who are not getting enough

adseguy

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Jul 1, 2007
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who ever confirmed that this worked in the first place. I'm taking this with a grain of salt until someone can prove it.

I doubt sleep mode will care if the apps are OPEN in the background much less if they even running (which they aren't)
:(
 

jptolife

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Jul 15, 2007
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who ever confirmed that this worked in the first place. I'm taking this with a grain of salt until someone can prove it.

I doubt sleep mode will care if the apps are OPEN in the background much less if they even running (which they aren't)
:(
Did you try it yet? I can confirm it works like other people here who have done it and can say it works too. So why not give it a try and see for yourself.
 

zac12345

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Jul 18, 2007
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I just did it and it worked perfect, Thanks. I closed the browser and music and a movie to. Now I was wondering is there a way to look at running applications so we can check to see what is still running?
 

DRabbit

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Jul 2, 2007
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Did you try it yet? I can confirm it works like other people here who have done it and can say it works too. So why not give it a try and see for yourself.
I personally think it's a load of crap. YES, it does indeed close the applications, but I do not for one second believe it preserves battery life.

The most reasonable way to preserve your battery is to keep WiFi and WiFi auto-connect off when you're not using it, to keep bluetooth off when you're not using it, and to turn your screen brightness down. I'm getting 2 days without charging typically, and have gone as long as 3 days.

And I NEVER use the "hold home" button thingy. It's dumb. LOL

:p
 

jptolife

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I personally think it's a load of crap. YES, it does indeed close the applications, but I do not for one second believe it preserves battery life.

The most reasonable way to preserve your battery is to keep WiFi and WiFi auto-connect off when you're not using it, to keep bluetooth off when you're not using it, and to turn your screen brightness down. I'm getting 2 days without charging typically, and have gone as long as 3 days.

And I NEVER use the "hold home" button thingy. It's dumb. LOL

:p
No, actually you are dumb. It makes total sense. It is just like in a computer. When a program is open it still uses memory even if you are not acively using it. The same happens with the iPhone.:p
 

emx620

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Jul 13, 2007
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Also, people probably know this, but turning Wi-Fi off unless you are using it is a BIG battery saver.
 

DRabbit

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No, actually you are dumb. It makes total sense. It is just like in a computer. When a program is open it still uses memory even if you are not acively using it. The same happens with the iPhone.:p
Funny, I never called YOU dumb, just this method to "save battery life".

Go and start loading a webpage (do a busy one with lots to load, like CNN.com) and then, while it's still loading, go back to the home screen (the normal way). When you open Safari back up, you'll notice it didn't load the page in the background at all... it stopped running when you went back home. It picks back up when you go back into Safari. It's most noticeable when you use EDGE (since WiFi is so fast you might not realize it).

Just because you think it's "open" doesn't mean it's using significant enough resources to eat up battery life. I personally don't think it's using enough resources to impact battery life in any substantial way.

The proof is in the pudding honestly. Like I said, I NEVER use the "hold to close" method suggested here, and I'm going 2 and 3 days without charging.
 

jptolife

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I'm not even gonna bother anymore in talking to you... some people are just stuck and I'm not gonna be the one struggling with you. I'm happy that some people got it to work and believe it does, that's enough for me. Thanks
 

DRabbit

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I'm not even gonna bother anymore in talking to you... some people are just stuck and I'm not gonna be the one struggling with you. I'm happy that some people got it to work and believe it does, that's enough for me. Thanks
LOL, okay.
 

zac12345

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Jul 18, 2007
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OK I know I said I did it and it worked but now I'm back to being unsure again. So more testing is needed. BUT I still would like to know if on our iPhones is there a way to see what programs are running like you can do on other phones.
 

Spin This!

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May 4, 2007
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When a program is open it still uses memory even if you are not ac[t]ively using it.
Not entirely. Using memory and wasting processor cycles are two separate issues. [Mac] OS X uses a scheme called Virtual Memory. Any memory it can't map to physical memory, it dumps off into a swap file on the hard drive (or in the iPhone's case, the Flash memory). So when you switch applications it just reloads the memory from the hard drive's cache, letting you bounce back to where you were before.

afaik, ram and the iPhone's flash-based memory use the same amount of power whether something is being stored or not. If this force-quitting theory was true, you'd get worse and worse battery life as the drive was being more filled with files. That obviously can't be true in practice. On a hard drive based model, this is somewhat true, as you have to physically move to more parts of the drive to access the files that are stored on the outer ring of the drive. But I'd wager it's negligible.

Quitting and relaunching an application is a pretty cpu intensive process because it also has to potentially load in any shared libraries as well.

On the iPhone, it also looks like the applications relaunch themselves after being force quit, because they immediately activate to being launched. This fits the device's paradigm of "you don't quit and launch applications, you just switch to them."
 

jptolife

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Not entirely. Using memory and wasting processor cycles are two separate issues. [Mac] OS X uses a scheme called Virtual Memory. Any memory it can't map to physical memory, it dumps off into a swap file on the hard drive (or in the iPhone's case, the Flash memory). So when you switch applications it just reloads the memory from the hard drive's cache, letting you bounce back to where you were before.

afaik, ram and the iPhone's flash-based memory use the same amount of power whether something is being stored or not. If this force-quitting theory was true, you'd get worse and worse battery life as the drive was being more filled with files. That obviously can't be true in practice. On a hard drive based model, this is somewhat true, as you have to physically move to more parts of the drive to access the files that are stored on the outer ring of the drive. But I'd wager it's negligible.

Quitting and relaunching an application is a pretty cpu intensive process because it also has to potentially load in any shared libraries as well.

On the iPhone, it also looks like the applications relaunch themselves after being force quit, because they immediately activate to being launched. This fits the device's paradigm of "you don't quit and launch applications, you just switch to them."
You are not supposed to "force quit it" every time you are gonna close it, just when you are not going to use it for a while.
 

DRabbit

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You are not supposed to "force quit it" every time you are gonna close it, just when you are not going to use it for a while.
Still think it's ridiculous, but I know you're not going to waste your time arguing with me about it - LOL - "force quit" is for when an application freezes. There is no reason to force quit when you're not going to use that application for a while... the power it would be consuming is negligible.

If your theory were true, as Spin This agrees, you'd get worse and worse performance as time wore on... which isn't the case at all.
 

DRabbit

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I wondered about this issue as well. Anyone know what the manual says about it?
I don't know what the manual says, but Apple's site refers to "force quitting" (by holding the home button for more than 5 seconds) when an application freezes.
 

jptolife

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If you wanna use it, you use it. If it doesn't work for you then too bad. I know I have almost doubled my battery life. I used to need to charge it every day (Heavy user) and after using this the last time I charged was yesterday morning and I still have little less than half left. I just thought I'd let people know about it but even people who think "It's ridiculous" are here... I guess wasting their time since they don't think it works.

That's it for me folks. Peace:)
 

HarleyS

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Jul 14, 2007
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Well up until today (when i started trying this) I was using about 80% of my battery by the time I went to bed at night. I have been trying this all day and still have a full bar. By now i would have atleast gone through 50% or more.
 

direktor

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Jun 26, 2007
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Force quitting apps all the time will eventually create corrupt preference files. When an app closes normally (or in the case of the iPhone, the app is switched to the background), it would write info back to it's caches and preference files. If you force quit it every time, it would never have a chance to do this, and eventually the state of the caches/preferences will not match the actual state of the app and you will get crashes.

Doing this constantly is a recipe for an unstable phone.